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Apnea running?

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
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CarbonCod

New Member
Apr 28, 2003
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Since it has not been deleted i might aswell make a post of it.

What is your experience with apnea running?

I don't know if it has improved my perfomance yet, but it seemes like it could.
 
Last edited:

Levi Athan

New Member
May 2, 2003
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Taking into account that no one mentions it as a valuable method of raising endurance, muscular tolerance or anything else, for that matter, it is probably not quite as effective as other methodics.

Which still doesn't implicate that it should be avoided at all costs - I, for instance, happen to practice it for a month with no adverse effects by incorporating anaerobic elements into my daily running routine. In my personal opinion, it proved to be rather effective in one thing: developing efficient lactic acid disposal, thus effectively reducing muscle recovery time - I only had leg muscles have that strained feel during the first week or so.

While swimming utilizes leg muscles in another way, anaerobic running would still have a certain benefit, as well as improve general cardiovascular fitness and increase heart's tolerance to oxygen shortage. However, running itself is rather stressful to the body. Combined with apnea, it could result in a hazardous situation. This is why cardio\leg muscles anaerobic training is mostly practiced using treadmills or cycle machines.

- Levi.
 

ramstam

New Member
May 9, 2003
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I do

I hold my breath while I run. I'm not sure if it helps, because
I hold my breath doing many things. My best while driving is
3:48. I bet it helps.
 

Zoros

New Member
Jan 11, 2003
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Re: I do

Originally posted by ramstam
I hold my breath while I run. I'm not sure if it helps, because
I hold my breath doing many things. My best while driving is
3:48. I bet it helps.

How far/for how long can you run while holding your breath?

I train once a week on a running machine and there I can adjust the speed and my best time was 1:05 while running at 7 km/h.. Dont know how much that is in miles/h

/ Zoros
 

ramstam

New Member
May 9, 2003
227
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I do it at different points in my run. I haven't timed my running breath holds. Most of the time I use holding my breath while running to transition from an out of breath condition, to a slow
deep style of breathing.
 

keyspearfisher

New Member
Nov 9, 2002
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There was akid when I was in high scholl that would run the 400 meter dash on a single breath. I think that he ran sub 50 seconds. A full out sprint on one breath.
 

Zoros

New Member
Jan 11, 2003
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Originally posted by keyspearfisher
There was akid when I was in high scholl that would run the 400 meter dash on a single breath. I think that he ran sub 50 seconds. A full out sprint on one breath.

400 meters! That wasn't bad...
I wonder what results he would get if he had been running for 20 minutes and then would try :)

/ Zoros
 

ramstam

New Member
May 9, 2003
227
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Today I made 4:18 while stuck in traffic. Has nothing to do
with running, but I had to watch the brake lights.
 

Seal

Deepsy
Apr 29, 2003
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I aint too sharp on the running yet. But in apnea walk I do a steady 100-110 steps I almost blacked out walking the dogs with a record of 115 but that was scary.
 

zipy

New Member
Nov 19, 2002
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hi

damm 400m that is alot!!
i made it a bit over 200m and nearly passed out!

Hmmm am i bad or is he good ;)

Jure
 

Levi Athan

New Member
May 2, 2003
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I'm seriously disappointed by the fact that my limiting factor in such dynamic exercise seems to have little relation with either overall physical condition (I don't even feel remotely close to blacking out or otherwise losing control) or breath reflex suppression (I still remember I was amazed that after a while the pain increase stops and stays at the level of 'inconvenient' without getting all the way to 'totally unbearable').

NOTE: I beg your pardon if my following remarks may seem distasteful to you, but I personally treat it like the physiology it is, without considering it to be distasteful. This is not a lame attempt at toilet humor. If I will receive an answer, I expect it to be just as serious.

During the late stages of apnea exercise, I feel the involuntary relaxation of the muscles which normally keep the anus closed. It is as if all the tension from the lungs has relocated itself there. In order to keep the above mentioned muscles in their normal shut state, I have to make a serious effort (Which, as you might imagine, can be especially difficult while running), and thus it all usually ends with stopping the breath-hold and some major wind-breaking. I've never suffered from meteorism or any other gastrointestinal problems. In fact, this reaction seems to occur completely independently of how much time had passed since the last meal or bathroom visit. To which degree is this abnormal?

- Levi.
 

zipy

New Member
Nov 19, 2002
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rofl ha ha !!!
khm... Sorry for that but i have no such problem, neither did i hear of enyone having such problems... But hey everyone is an individual your body seems to react that way...
Maybe someone else can give you any better explanation.

Jure
 

Pezman

We pee deep. Ew!
Sep 24, 2002
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I know a bunch of folks who have to void after intense apnea efforts. In fact, I think that I was a post in here once to the effect that Herbert Nitsch's wr dynamic of 183 was cut short due to the fact that we was feeling a little incontinent (thus he "only" made 183m). I think that I've also seen some posts that blame the phenomenon on stimulation of the vagal nerve (that one nerve seems to get credit for anything that is otherwise hard to explain -- it seems to run the whole damn autonomic nervous system).

Power lifters also have a similar problem when squatting or deadlifting due to the high intra-abdominal pressure (cuts off blood supply to the brain and gives the intestinal tract contents a nice push). The posture (legs apart, business end of the GI tract aimed downward) helps the process along.

Are you packing when you do this or in efforts prior to the apnea walking? If so the wind may be due to swallowed air exiting all at once when your bowels relax.

A few of my dive buddies have this issue to varying degree. Luckily I've never been bothered by it. Maybe we should start a thread on wetsuit "dump valves" as a follow up to the thread on wetsuit "p-valves".

.
 

cavedave

New Member
Oct 15, 2002
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running incontinence

Cathrina MacErnine lost control of her bowels during the 1998 London Marathon live on television.
Vomiting for Marathon runners is common. Control loss less so, but it does happen when the body is under extreme physical stress.
It also happens after injuries. Soldiers commonly lose bowel control. I assume its an immune reaction. Its better to void faeces then have it internal if theres an injury that may cause it to leak internally.
On a related note I've heard Yoga heads saying westeners have "tight arses" could it be that the problem is that over control of the anus is released under apnea conditions.
Scatalogical or what?
 

Jon

Dairyland diver
Supporter
Apr 7, 2001
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On a related note I've heard Yoga heads saying westeners have "tight arses" could it be that the problem is that over control of the anus is released under apnea conditions.


Are you saying that we're anal retentive? ;) :D
 

thin_air

Alphabet
Sep 15, 2001
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i have two theories relating to this subject... one refers to running, the other to apnea

1. while running, (or generally doing anything strenous, where one has to carry his bodyweight) it has been shown that our bodies attempt to reduce our weight as much as possible, it does this in one of three ways: urinating, deficating, or vomiting. this seems to be an "animal instinct" that our predecessors left us with. this has also been noted in animals, when being chased animals have a tendency to do one of those three things.

2. while in apnea i think that the need to go deficate is related to the increase pressure in the abdominal area, (as per what Pezman said)

actually, it looks like i have another point also...
as for soldiers "commonly" losing bowel control (first off im going to have to disagree with the commonly part... i havent seen it done yet, but i will see after my infantry course this summer), as with point #1 we have to carry a heavy load (well, what do you expect, we live out of our rucksacks...) and when we need to hurry, our body tries to lower the weight we have to carry as much as possible

cheers
 

Cliff Etzel

Photographer & Visual Storyteller
Jul 7, 2000
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Originally posted by Jon
On a related note I've heard Yoga heads saying westeners have "tight arses" could it be that the problem is that over control of the anus is released under apnea conditions.


Are you saying that we're anal retentive? ;) :D
rofl
 

keyspearfisher

New Member
Nov 9, 2002
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Before track in High school, half the team would be in the head eliminating extra weight. Maybe it's like women getting on the same cycle?
 

caymandiver

give me gills!
Jun 18, 2003
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Holy cow apnea jogging is hard! I tried 5sec inhale, 5sec hold, 5 sec out. I could do 5 sets of those at the most. Usally around 4. It's like drowning while breathing.

I found that not thinking while jogging really helps. Just being "there", as opposed to thinking, seems to consume less O2. I can't remember which thread it was, static pbs?, but someone said that Pinpin did an awesome experiment. I'm not sure if I got this right but he went down under thinking about many things. Then he went down not thinking. The result? He could dive longer without thinking. This must apply to jogging too no?

In another note, do you breath from your mouth or your nose when ruuning apnea. I e-mailed Tanya Streeter about this question. I also asked her how important apnea jogging is to her. It would be intersting to read her reply. I will post it as soon as I get it.

Well guys, Good luck!
 
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