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Beginner’s reasonable expectations?

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aquatic ape

New Member
Aug 25, 2004
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5
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Beginner’s reasonable expectations

I am assuming that, freediving is a combination of natural talent, training and conditioning. If a person is in above average physical shape and trains with known good methods what kind of improvements could one expect with average talent?

My current performance is: no fins, dynamic in a pool 25 to 35 meters in 25 -35 seconds. I can repeat this about 7 times with about a 2-3 minute break in between. I haven't tried it for longer. The pool is 10 feet deep on one end and I am following the bottom of the pool. My best dry static is about 1 min 50 seconds. What range of improvements can I expect? Is it realistic to shoot for 50 meters in the next few months with a dynamic bottom time of 1 min? Finally what are some success stories from others experiences?
 

efattah

Well-Known Member
Mar 2, 2001
3,294
487
173
Many people in above average shape have reached the following in just a couple of months:
- 3'30" to 5'00" static
- 75m to 90m dynamic with fins
- 30m deep dive with fins

Of course, failure to reach those milestones doesn't mean much, some people start slow and pick it up later. Some elite athletes have reached more than 6 minutes in static on their very first day--but that is very rare.


Eric Fattah
BC, Canada
 

Ricochet

New Member
Jul 23, 2004
258
41
0
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@ Aquatic ape
Well, I call myself a very newbie to freediving.. but hey, I think thats what you asked for. :D

I started 6 weeks ago and this is where I am now:
My static personal best is at 5:45.
I just came from the swimming pool, where I made 50 meters dynamic without fins (for the first time, never tried before).
I think I made the 50m in slightly more than a minute.

All in all I pretty suck under water, when I move.
I think the dynamic apnea depends ALOT on fitness. I definetly need much more aerobic training.

You may want to try "Static Tables". That helped me alot to improve my static times.


Rico
 

derelictp

Freediver
Oct 16, 2001
397
63
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Technique

Rico,

I belive that technique training (with your fin/fins) alone will take you to 100m without more 'fitness'. This will help you swim both faster AND more relaxed.

Offcourse you will have to study good technique.

Good luck:)
 

Ricochet

New Member
Jul 23, 2004
258
41
0
41
I think my swimming style without fins is not too bad.
I need 5 strokes for the first 25 meters (with push off at the beginning), but much more for the last 25 :-/.
I saw the video of this guy that only needs 3 strokes and I tried to copy his style. Maybe I can do it in 4, if I shave my legs :D :t :D

I also noticed that I tend to tense unused muscles like the abdominal muscles and the muscles around the chest. I have no idea why I do this... ...need to be more relaxed.. I guess.

I'll probalby go to the pool again tomorrow, but next time with fins.
I don't have apnea fins, yet. Only those ordinary fins. Maybe I should try the Sporasub H.DESSAULT fins from the deeperblue shop.


Regards,
Sascha
 

aquatic ape

New Member
Aug 25, 2004
30
5
0
53
Thanks for the replies. My starting point seems to be a little bit below the bar. Rico’s 50M without much training is impressive. I have noticed that when I don’t try and just enjoy swimming and experiencing being under water I do the best. I have swam the 30 M and felt completely comfortable when not thinking about getting to the other side. I have not really begun to push myself, since I do not swim with a partner who is watching. Relaxing in a situation where it is not natural to relax, takes a lot of practice. I have recreationally trained for boxing and it is a similar situation. You need to relax when your mind is saying panic. I would run and work out to the point where I felt great, but once I stepped in the ring with someone trying to hit you everything changes.

Luke
 

Ricochet

New Member
Jul 23, 2004
258
41
0
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My experience is, that in freediving you boast new success every week. Especially in the beginning. Hell, I never expected to reach a breathhold time of 5:45.

In the first weeks I made lots of static tables. This improved my breathold time drastically. I made this programm for static tables.
Nowadays I concentrate on training my CO2 tolerance. That means I do only one breath every 75 seconds for 10 minutes.


Another thing that improves your bottom time is 'apnea walking'.
I live in the 4th floor and I always hold my breath while climbing the stairs ;). Another advantage of apnea walking is that you can do it every where at any time.

And last but not least, you need to find a breathup pattern to prepare for a dive. I'm still looking for the pattern that suits me best.

I'm pretty sure you will experience lots of successes in the next time. Your 35m in dynamic are just the beginning. (A very good beginning)



Have fun!

Sascha
 
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