• Welcome to the DeeperBlue.com Forums, the largest online community dedicated to Freediving, Scuba Diving and Spearfishing. To gain full access to the DeeperBlue.com Forums you must register for a free account. As a registered member you will be able to:

    • Join over 44,280+ fellow diving enthusiasts from around the world on this forum
    • Participate in and browse from over 516,210+ posts.
    • Communicate privately with other divers from around the world.
    • Post your own photos or view from 7,441+ user submitted images.
    • All this and much more...

    You can gain access to all this absolutely free when you register for an account, so sign up today!

Best fin size for Skindiving

annc

annc

Member
Apr 11, 2022
23
9
8
60
Hi guys, I'm an avid snorkeler who has tried to get a bit better at freediving to get down deeper and also set up shots with my gopro.

Initially, I had a pair of Cressi Paluas which are short fins but did the job while I got my legs and ankles back into shape. I then bought a pair of proper freediving fins which I practiced in the local pool with to get stronger, which I did. They really power but are a little awkward on the boat which I can deal with but...

The problem is while I can get down faster, I'm also much longer and feel uncomfortable getting too close to coral. I'm tending to shy away from using them and wondering if I should just invest in a set of normal length dive fins. Any thoughts? I don't want to spend a heap of $$$ as I already feel stupid wanting a third pair, I'm not into wanton consumerism.

What is everyone else using for skindiving fins?

Thanks! Ann
 
M

musubi

Active Member
Feb 9, 2017
120
59
43
39
Hi guys, I'm an avid snorkeler who has tried to get a bit better at freediving to get down deeper and also set up shots with my gopro.

Initially, I had a pair of Cressi Paluas which are short fins but did the job while I got my legs and ankles back into shape. I then bought a pair of proper freediving fins which I practiced in the local pool with to get stronger, which I did. They really power but are a little awkward on the boat which I can deal with but...

The problem is while I can get down faster, I'm also much longer and feel uncomfortable getting too close to coral. I'm tending to shy away from using them and wondering if I should just invest in a set of normal length dive fins. Any thoughts? I don't want to spend a heap of $$$ as I already feel stupid wanting a third pair, I'm not into wanton consumerism.

What is everyone else using for skindiving fins?

Thanks! Ann
Why is it that you feel uncomfortable getting too close to coral with these fins compared to the former ones? Is it because of risk of scratching the blades?
If you want something shorter, you can look into the Leaderfins brand and find the short bi-fins to see if those would work for you.

Typically for freediving, I see the use of longer blades (compared to the shorter rubber/plastic one-piece ones like the Palau's) to help with efficiency of kicking. Which freediving fins did you buy? I think the Cressi Gara's are a decent pair. They're longer freediving-like blades, but with plastic blades, so they're more affordable and less worrisome on scratches.

FWIW, I use long bladed carbon fins for spearfishing on and off the reef. They are less maneuverable and I stopped caring about scratches to my blades a long time ago. For the depths I go, shorter fins wouldn't work.
 
  • Like
Reactions: annc
annc

annc

Member
Apr 11, 2022
23
9
8
60
Thank you for the reply. My fins are Omer Eaglerays and I'm happy with them and not afraid of scratching, fins can be replaced :)

I'm worried about damaging coral. I used to work as a dive instructor and prided myself on good neutral buoyancy and not touching coral. I've seen first hand what fin pressure does to coral in areas where there is a lot of snorkeling/diving. I just don't think my pleasure or getting a few great photos is worth crunching coral on the Great Barrier Reef and it literally makes me uncomfortable and wrecks my serenity now time.

Ann
 
M

musubi

Active Member
Feb 9, 2017
120
59
43
39
Thank you for the reply. My fins are Omer Eaglerays and I'm happy with them and not afraid of scratching, fins can be replaced :)

I'm worried about damaging coral. I used to work as a dive instructor and prided myself on good neutral buoyancy and not touching coral. I've seen first hand what fin pressure does to coral in areas where there is a lot of snorkeling/diving. I just don't think my pleasure or getting a few great photos is worth crunching coral on the Great Barrier Reef and it literally makes me uncomfortable and wrecks my serenity now time.

Ann
Ahh I see. Awesome to hear you are reef conscious when you're out diving. It's hard to come across people caring.
It looks like those Eaglerays come with the "plastic" type blades. From my limited experience with that type, they can still be quite hard on the ankle, but more efficient than the shorter type blades. I can see how they would be harder on the reef as they're more rigid and less giving compared to the other composite counterparts. Especially if people push off the bottom with their blades (not saying you do).

I would think carbon or fiberglass blades would be less impactful, as long as the tips of the blades didn't jam into the reef somehow. The surface of the carbon/fiberglass blades are typically very smooth and I imagine they slip over any coral they come in contact with.

Longer blades are just a different animal compared to short ones. Is it possible to practice keeping the knees bent a little while you're at the bottom (or hovering) to prevent the fins from touching or harming the reef? The carbon/fiberglass blades typically do flex more in a kick compared to plastic ones. Do you think this would be helpful in your application?

IF you do plan on trying out the composite fin route, I would recommend at least feeling the blades in person, but hopefully being able to try them out. Not many shops offer that, but that's the best. It took me a long time to settle on the blades I have. One company's "Firm" is another company's "soft", so it can be really confusing out there.

Man, I'd love to dive the Great Barrier Reef someday. Definitely a bucket list item for me.
 
M

Michael-AT

Member
Sep 28, 2020
15
6
18
41
Maybe a medium length blade would be an ideal compromise for you. They are in between typical snorkeling fins like Palaus and full length freedive fins. I've recently bought Omer Stingray short and they are really nice. Maybe the Stingray short blades fit your Eagleray pocket? You'd need to check with Omer. Leaderfins have a medium sized blade length as well.

In the freedive equipment I have a thread going on about medium length fins.

+1 cool to hear you are reef concious. That attitude should be reinforced in any freedive training!
 
  • Like
Reactions: annc
annc

annc

Member
Apr 11, 2022
23
9
8
60
Ahh I see. Awesome to hear you are reef conscious when you're out diving. It's hard to come across people caring.
It looks like those Eaglerays come with the "plastic" type blades. From my limited experience with that type, they can still be quite hard on the ankle, but more efficient than the shorter type blades. I can see how they would be harder on the reef as they're more rigid and less giving compared to the other composite counterparts. Especially if people push off the bottom with their blades (not saying you do).

I would think carbon or fiberglass blades would be less impactful, as long as the tips of the blades didn't jam into the reef somehow. The surface of the carbon/fiberglass blades are typically very smooth and I imagine they slip over any coral they come in contact with.

Longer blades are just a different animal compared to short ones. Is it possible to practice keeping the knees bent a little while you're at the bottom (or hovering) to prevent the fins from touching or harming the reef? The carbon/fiberglass blades typically do flex more in a kick compared to plastic ones. Do you think this would be helpful in your application?

IF you do plan on trying out the composite fin route, I would recommend at least feeling the blades in person, but hopefully being able to try them out. Not many shops offer that, but that's the best. It took me a long time to settle on the blades I have. One company's "Firm" is another company's "soft", so it can be really confusing out there.

Man, I'd love to dive the Great Barrier Reef someday. Definitely a bucket list item for me.
Thanks Musubi, I think I would get more comfortable with them and could get a bit better. While softer blades are an option there are a lot of gullies I like to get into and just don't want to touch, at all.

You'll get here eventually :) If you go, check out some of the fishing and spearfishing groups on FB. I see lots of people popping into Cairns scoring reef trips with guys that have room on their boats for a share of fuel and a hand washing up. I imagine other areas along the southern end of the reef are the same.

Ann
 
annc

annc

Member
Apr 11, 2022
23
9
8
60
Maybe a medium length blade would be an ideal compromise for you. They are in between typical snorkeling fins like Palaus and full length freedive fins. I've recently bought Omer Stingray short and they are really nice. Maybe the Stingray short blades fit your Eagleray pocket? You'd need to check with Omer. Leaderfins have a medium sized blade length as well.

In the freedive equipment I have a thread going on about medium length fins.

+1 cool to hear you are reef concious. That attitude should be reinforced in any freedive training!
Thanks Michael, I will check out your thread. Medium blades in my Eaglerays would be excellent, I'll see if they are available. I was checking out Cressi Ara blades but can only see them available in soft in my area. I thought the harder medium length blades might be a nice compromise that would still give me decent power. We generally do overnight fishing/snorkeling trips where I get to snorkel when the tide is slack and fish aren't biting. I'm not out there for more than an a couple of hours in a day so it's not like I'm spearfishing and kicking around the full day.

Yes,

Ann
 
DeeperBlue.com - The Worlds Largest Community Dedicated To Freediving, Scuba Diving and Spearfishing

ABOUT US

ISSN 1469-865X | Copyright © 1996 - 2022 deeperblue.net limited.

DeeperBlue.com is the World's Largest Community dedicated to Freediving, Scuba Diving, Spearfishing and Diving Travel.

We've been dedicated to bringing you the freshest news, features and discussions from around the underwater world since 1996.

ADVERT