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Cost of building a deep pool

glubglub

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2007
107
10
58
San Diego
#1
I wonder what's the cost of building an in-ground vertical shaft pool. Say, 12 ft diameter, 10 - 20 meters deep. I mean they built Nemo33, so it's not something new. I'm thinking about a way scaled down versions, no caves, no restaurants on the sides, no windows, no frills, just deep but clean water. Well some sparse pool lights would help.

Anyway, just curious. There must be some of us here in pool construction business, right? :)

Take care and dive safe!
 
Dec 9, 2005
6,522
751
218
F:Lyon / CZ:Prague
apnea.cz
#3
It will be certainly much more expensive than a water tower, since you need much more technology (water filtering, and circulation, water heating, illumination, tank filling compressor, cleaning equipment,...), comfort (heating, locker rooms, showers, toilets, parking, office, room for stocking the diving equipment, medical emergency room, ...), and safety.

I do not know the cost of the diving pit/tower alone, but the 20m deep diving pit here in Lyon was built within an entire aquatic center for 14,130,000 €. My rough guess is that if there was no swimming pool, sauna, gym, and external garden, and the building was much smaller, it could have been perhaps some 20-30% of that price, but I may be completely wrong. You can try contacting the company who built the auqatic center: http://www.tna.fr/projets/references-aquatiques/centre-aquatique-les-vagues-meyzieu-69-
 

Kars

Well-Known Member
Oct 24, 2003
3,443
565
203
41
The Netherlands
www.freeapnea.nl
#4
Think energy. It also depends on the kind of soil. If you got solid rock it's much more difficult then sand.

I had a similar idea, only no money. I was thinking buying 3m sewer rings, stack 'm up, and let gravity and digging let it sink into ground.
If these aren't available, making a reusable concrete casing could be my choice.
Also Buying 2nd hand farmer silo's, stacking them, tough they are likely to need reinforcements to stand the soil pressure.

I did study building engineering, but obviously there was no class for dive towers / pits.
 

efattah

Well-Known Member
Mar 2, 2001
3,294
456
173
BC, Canada
www.fluidgoggles.com
#5
Though we also floated the idea of digging a dive tank, I also had the idea of creating a heated water column. Since in Vancouver we have 200m deep water right off the shore, (but it is cold), I imagined dropping insulated rings, and then using some sort of pump/heater to circulate and heat the water. The benefit is that the rings could be weak-- no pressure differential, but the whole thing would still be complicated, and the legality dubious.

If it did work, it could be heated to any temperature, there would be no current, and with a filter the visibility could be made enormous.
 

sgnips

Apnea Academy Instructor
Aug 6, 2008
403
36
0
Italy
217.64.207.98
#6
Though we also floated the idea of digging a dive tank, I also had the idea of creating a heated water column. Since in Vancouver we have 200m deep water right off the shore, (but it is cold), I imagined dropping insulated rings, and then using some sort of pump/heater to circulate and heat the water. The benefit is that the rings could be weak-- no pressure differential, but the whole thing would still be complicated, and the legality dubious.

If it did work, it could be heated to any temperature, there would be no current, and with a filter the visibility could be made enormous.
A similar project has been presented here in Italy, near Milan
They intended to build it in a small abandoned sand mine, that has now become an artificial lake
40m deep, but it seems the project sank somewhere
 

ReefTroll

Expert Space Drummer
Apr 9, 2008
1,712
332
138
38
Sawtell, Australia
#8
On a housing show, possibly Grand Designs, there was a home built with a water tower next to it. The house was raised so their verandah (deck) was the same height as the top of the tower and it was HUGE!!!
 

x_yeti

Well-Known Member
Jan 1, 2006
267
17
58
Cape Town, South Africa
#9
The South African Navy recently built a 16m above ground submarine escape training tank for about 4.7 million Euros. No doubt it could have been cheaper and was originally spec'ed to be 26m high, but it does provide an idea of what an above ground tank would cost. Maybe halve that price for a no-frills tank.
 

sross

Well-Known Member
Aug 2, 2007
312
36
68
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
#10
Since in Vancouver we have 200m deep water right off the shore, (but it is cold), I imagined dropping insulated rings, and then using some sort of pump/heater to circulate and heat the water. The benefit is that the rings could be weak-- no pressure differential, but the whole thing would still be complicated, and the legality dubious.

If it did work, it could be heated to any temperature, there would be no current, and with a filter the visibility could be made enormous .
Years ago I was working with a very large crew of other divers (20 in all) and we created 4 water colums for a research study by planting bases on the bottom of Saaninch Inlet at 80', then we raised kevlar fabric tubes up to the surface, supported them with large float rings, and anchored the whole thing in place.

The forces on the tubes even from gentle tidal currents were enormous, requiring a network of pretty strong steel cables, and the fabric of the tubes wore out surprisingly fast from working back and forth.

You might find that you would require continual maintenance to keep a diving column intact, and in the long run, building an in-ground pool might be cheaper. Also, the seawater outside the column has a larger heat capacity than earth, no mater how wet the soil is. Also heat diffuses away through soil very slowly, wheras in the sea convection carries heat away almost instantly. No matter how well you insulated, I think your energy costs would be much higher in the sea compared to an in-ground pool. In the sea perhaps the only way to make it affordable would be to not heat the interior and everybody has to use wetsuits.
 
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SubSub

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2015
459
169
58
41
Stockholm
#12
Bạn đang có định xây dựng hồ bơi nhưng chưa biết bắt đầu từ đâu và cần chuẩn bị những gì , điều đó thật khó khăn cho những chủ đầu tư không chuyên nghiệp, do đó các bạn hãy đến với giathinhpool để được tư vấn cụ thể hơn nhé. Đến với gia thịnh pool tại đây chúng tôi chuyên tư vấn thiết kế thi công bể bơi chuyên nghiệp và uy tín
If you’re gonna spam in an old dead thread, you could at least have the decency to do it in English!