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Could you dive to the titanic?

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
It can take a long time to get an up-to-date response or contact with relevant users.

Murat

Promethian
Jun 21, 2002
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may be their bone surface is as hard as sub marine glass:D


By the way, diving to the titanin in one breath is freaky cooolll

Do you get that 5m/s speed with anchor or some machine? I think there is no way to do this with fin:confused:
 

Jay Styron

New Member
Aug 31, 2001
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(Whales)-
Maybe their bones are filled w/ fluid already or are maybe they're structurally developed in a way to handle the pressure. Also I'm almost positive our bones aren't hollow either or have large quantities of gas in them.
As far as the super saturated breathing liguid-maybe. I think you're gonna run into O2 toxicity problems long b/f you see the wreck.
Jay
 

efattah

Well-Known Member
Mar 2, 2001
3,294
487
173
Jay,

You can't get O2 toxicity from liquid breathing, unless the liquid starts off in the O2 toxic range. The amount of O2 in the liquid will not change with depth, so as long as the liquid is okay to breathe at the surface, it should be fine 'down there.'


Eric Fattah
BC, Canada
 

Jay Styron

New Member
Aug 31, 2001
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Good catch Eric. I hadn't thought the whole thing through w/ respect to the O2 concentration not increasing w/ depth since it's in a liquid.
Still have to get past the pneumonia after flushing the liquid out of the lungs. As I recall thats been one of the big things if everything else went right on the dive. Well for the rats and some dogs I believe.
Jay
 

efattah

Well-Known Member
Mar 2, 2001
3,294
487
173
Yes, the recovery would be messy at best. Doing a one breath dive on a liquid mix, you would surface on the edge of running out of O2. Either you surface and then try to take some more breaths of liquid, or you cough out the liquid (and probably black out) as the paramedics do their thing! Pretty ugly. Well, we're discussing if it's possible, not if it's pretty!


Eric Fattah
BC, Canada
 

JHammer

New Member
Nov 11, 2003
5
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What about the other side of the problem- equipment failure. How deep can you go before the face piece cracks? How about the valves in the breathing system? Metal cylinders are strong, but even metal reches a point where it starts to deform. I'd hate to be strapped to a cylinder that implodes from the pressure. Not to mention the extreme cold at depth affecting the diver and the equipment. Trip of a lifetime but I think I'll let someone else go first!
 

FreeFloat

Underwater Tourist
Jun 5, 2003
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Yes, equipment failure. As any scuba diver will know paying attention to your gear usually tells you there is a problem requiring attention - mask flooding, regulator no longer delivering air, or breathing 'wet'. However, if you're already breathing a liquid, and your mask develops a leak, you wouldn't be able to tell that you are no longer breathing the special liquid as opposed to just plain water - and you can and will drown at that point. Or slowly suffocate as the mixture of liquids you breathe becomes more and more dilute and hypoxic............
 

Jay Styron

New Member
Aug 31, 2001
500
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I think this originally was talking about freediving to the Titanic not scuba so equipment failure would be minimal. Not that I would want to try.
Jay
 

mps798

New Member
Jul 15, 2005
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hi thin air . A not so smart (really) tries to answer
my dear friend liquit can not be pressurized , so , if there was that kind of liquit oxygen you discribe (might already be and used experimentally by ... let say ...... hmmmm us seals?- remember the mouse breathing in liquid oxygen in a lab ha? ) then , and taking in mind what you said perfect gas, the quantity and etc etc etc a diver could dive to that depth (all theoritical ) dont forget limbs contain liquid and liquit can not be pressurized . By the way , yes bones contain liquid , and yes there are and other places containing air (remember what happens in the toilet :) ) oooh yes and blood carrying oxygen to brain (what is this) so if all this was solved the diver probably would kill himself because of the long deco time he would had to made so , finally she or he would be dead either by killing himself or by getting old durring deco time ,hehehehehe
 

mps798

New Member
Jul 15, 2005
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ooh and dont forget
warning dont try the deco time you need from the depth of titanic at home try it at your kitchen you might get hungry you know

just joking

hope you will find your answers
 

tom yerian

New Member
Sep 26, 2004
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Erik said:
Vince, assuming that somehow all the CNS problems could be dealt with and you dived filled with liquid, you would be fine. Water is not compressible (not to a degree that is noticeable). We are made of fluids, and would not be crushed.
I thought that some chamber experiments had been done to over 3000' with the resulting tremors and loss of control, but maybe I'm mistaken. I think it was a French Comm Dive company ?
Chers,
Erik Y.
The company is Comex, it is french commercial diving company, and they blew out I believe to two thousand ft. Using a hydrogen mix, and an 02% less than .04 %... Capt. Tom:crutch :crutch :crutch :crutch
 
O

omega3

Guest
The famous landmark dives made by Comex were the "Janus" series (ended 1977)and the "Entex 9" dive of 1983 (610m)

I believe Duke University did 686m in 1981.

However the "work output" by the divers was minimal I believe. No surprise there as that is usually the case at even 10m....haha

A few of the guys I work with have done working dives at 300m. They tell me that it is like breathing "soup" and there isn`t much energy for any practical work.

Last year a chamber dive with 8 divers was conducted to see the feasabillity of carrying out a job in Norway at 360m and I think the storage was 280m.

If I remember right 1 had trouble going down and 3 had trouble coming up!!!

Some colleagues have just completed a job at 250m. I am told it wasn`t very nice!!!

So gas is out.

Now I don`t know too much about breathing liquid but it is definately denser than gas and I know of rumours/stories of rats and a Frenchman that has tried it (and supposedly died)

but I do know the lungs don`t take to kindly to liquid after birth.

I`m gonna sit in the "not possible" camp a while longer till I get better info:)

Great dream though and maybe one day
 
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naiad

Apnea Carp
Supporter
Oct 11, 2003
2,897
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Cool thread!

Not planning on trying liquid breathing any time soon, but still interesting! ;)
 

kmo

Fish killer
Oct 31, 2005
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"but I do know the lungs don`t take to kindly to liquid after birth."

Just to throw in a weird/sick-in-the-mind one:
What if a baby was never given air to breathe, only liquid or the ATP solution mentioned earlier?
Obviously not ethical, but purely in hypothetical terms.
 
O

omega3

Guest
Scary...Dr Frankenstein.
I think the first question there would be about gaseous exchange in the lungs with an O2 saturated low viscousity liquid given that the intercostal/diaphragm muscles would not be well developed and assisted breathing is a step too far already at the end of the moral gangplank.

The question would be....could enough O2 be supplied to sustain life, given those factors and understanding that no liquid exchange takes place in the foetus` lungs for the supply of O2 and I guess is there as a lubricant/residue of the environment. Hmmmmmmm ?????he asks himself ,scratching chin.

.......it only gets worse from there with the implications!!!

Now looking at the flip side and a very distant scifi future. A resounding success and eventually a community of sea dwellers who have lost the abillity to speak and communicate with whistles/clicks etc. as writing SHARK!!! behind you!!!! on a slate has proved inefective as an early warning system. Would they have neat rebreather/wetsuit systems to go visit Gt. Auntie Moreau.

Dream on...might make a great film though!!!!
 
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naiad

Apnea Carp
Supporter
Oct 11, 2003
2,897
449
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Now there's an idea... if I could become acclimatised to liquid breathing, it would solve quite a few problems! I would have the ultimate excuse for not doing things like using public transport, going to cold and unreliable sports centres, office work, etc. I would also not be feeling ill as I am now, with a perpetual chest infection caused by the above things, mostly the overcrowded public transport. I could say "Today I'm not going to work/bus travel/train travel/gym/pool, because I live in a huge tank of liquid, and getting out would mean getting used to breathing air again, which is too much hassle, so I'm staying put!" I wouldn't be able to talk, but I could write it on a slate.

I've been on the quest for the ultimate excuse for years, and I've found it! Freedom at last!

I guess this is what happens when I'm stuck indoors with no diving.

Lucia
 

jimdoe2you

freediver/spearo/comedian
Sep 26, 2005
1,091
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Dear "Soon to be the new Deeperblue.net Queen",

I dunno??? ....................in that big tank you'd still have to breathe your own pee pee :t !!!!

I don't think that's freedom. This thread should focus less on breathing liquid like a fish, and more on the evolution needed to our own internal organs to become more whale like (sperm whale can dive 1000M for over an hour).

:)
 
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