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Could you dive to the titanic?

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
It can take a long time to get an up-to-date response or contact with relevant users.

naiad

Apnea Carp
Supporter
Oct 11, 2003
2,897
449
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I hadn't thought of that. rofl

Becoming more like a whale would have the same effect i.e. not having to do the above things, so I might go with that option.

Even more difficult though...

The first step of the whale transformation is to eat more, to gain insulating blubber. Bring on the food...
 
O

omega3

Guest
What are you suggesting....genetic modification???? great idea!!! I`m all for it. I see many westerners trying to emulate the whale in size, Its a start I suppose. Although the Sperm whale may be able to hold its breath for over an hour at depths of 1000m ...or more........It can`t drive to the local supermarket for a six pack and a frozen pizza and then go lounge around and watch day time tv........silly..... just what do they do down there?????? hunt squid????......pffff ...yaah right. How boring is that if its not for pleasure??
 
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jimdoe2you

freediver/spearo/comedian
Sep 26, 2005
1,091
423
173
We're not fat, ....................we just have a lot of everything here, especially food and we are, .....errr, .......big boned and stout :t .

Also, you need to respect your elders, since I was born on July 23, 1969, you should bow down to me, ...............plus I out weigh you by 150 kilos.

rofl rofl rofl
 
O

omega3

Guest
Lol....ageist!!

Anyway ..... I COULD DIVE THE TITANIC. Just give me the financial backing and I will prove it.

NB. level of financial backing will be directly related to level of proof of dive.:)
 

naiad

Apnea Carp
Supporter
Oct 11, 2003
2,897
449
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Ok I'm up for the challenge.

Give me...
A 1000m rope
Underwater contact lenses
A suit which doesn't compress
A depth gauge which is accurate and water resistant to 1000m
5l of Liquivent

And I'll post the story here!
 

jimdoe2you

freediver/spearo/comedian
Sep 26, 2005
1,091
423
173
:confused: ................I'm worried if we gave you all those things, you'd never post another thing ever again.

rofl rofl rofl rofl
 
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O

omega3

Guest
"Liquivent"....you got a patent on that??? ace!! Love to see the warning label on that one rofl

I was thinking more along the lines of £10.00 for 1 minute photoshop and I might still be in ma Speedo.

Of course for 10K .....much tidier job.

1000k and the production company goes bust in mysterious circumstances.....hmmmmmm
 
O

omega3

Guest
Wow!!! There had to be I suppose lol
Wonder if it works?
Thats it settled then....your off to the Titanic.

But I will get there first!rofl
 
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naiad

Apnea Carp
Supporter
Oct 11, 2003
2,897
449
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Now I've got to find some sponsors for my project.

Better get started as soon as possible - I wouldn't want to find myself beaten to it by Photoshop! rofl
 

sinkweight

fat flotilla
Supporter
Aug 16, 2004
1,005
287
138
45
Gimme my swimtrunks, an anchor, a disposable underwater camera, and have a curried bacon/lettuce/tomato/avacado sandy-wich ready for when I come back up!
 

Pliny

New Member
Mar 17, 2006
17
0
0
Two things.
First: Chefkoch's article was most informative and seems accurate from what I know. Second: RE:isotonic, hyperoxygenated water solution. The US Navy has used this technique on humans successfully (according to navy divers I know) but found it required somthing like an intensive unit to make the transition back to gas and was therefore impractical in the field and they stopped the work.
 

Pliny

New Member
Mar 17, 2006
17
0
0
I think the subject, although it might seem silly on the surface, brings up a very interesting topic or two. What are the practical limits of working deep? and...Is there any point in pursuing really deep diving if remotely controled vehicles can do the job without the risk?
 

Hypersquid1

Ride The Lightning
Jun 15, 2005
166
4
0
i think at that depth you would go squish. from what i have heard, the pressure is too great for a human to dive at. eardrums would probably go first. i will check with my science teacher, he is an expert on air and water pressure.
 

John A

Well-Known Member
Sep 15, 2004
118
13
108
Hypersquid1 said:
i think at that depth you would go squish. from what i have heard, the pressure is too great for a human to dive at. eardrums would probably go first. i will check with my science teacher, he is an expert on air and water pressure.


We are water, water does not compress. Just clear your ears and enjoy the ride down!
 

fogish

Ashvagosha | Bucephalus
Mar 13, 2006
166
20
0
efattah said:
Okay, so how do whales dive to 3500m+ without their bones collapsing?
I am going to assume whale bones are nearly or the same in composition as human bones, and this is all just one big shot in the dark. Human bones are filled with marrow, mostly liquid with lots of cells since this is the production center for red blood cells, including the long bones like the tibia. The long bones have a hard compact (compacta) outer surface and the ends are a softer spongy material (cancellous). Cartilage is a very soft bone tissue and contains alot more liquid than regular bone (synovial fluid). I could see a problem with the synovial membrane being damaged in the joints from extreme pressure since our body is not 100% fluid. But I doubt that we have large enough gas pockets and solid structure with no fluid in/around it in our body to have enough of a conformational change from liquid pressure to severely damage the fragile membranes in the body. If your bones happen to be mainly compacta or ossified with little to no marrow inside then I don't know what would happen. I have never tried compressing a brittle object that had liquid inside of it.

Drysuit: The increased pressure on your dry suit would compress against your skin and you may have a circulation problem in that area. So even with a nice drysuit your bodies surface temp. would decrease, unless you had a suit that does not compress at 3800 meters.

In conclusion if you were able to fill the lungs and nasal cavities with liquid descend, at a rate that you could equilize your ears, and keep warm, the bodies structure should not have a problem with it. And you are better off doing this when you are younger, so if we could take that experimental baby and just drop it down there and pull it back it would do fine (minus the temperature) since it's bones are all cartilage.
 
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