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Did you ever have to rescue your buddy?

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
It can take a long time to get an up-to-date response or contact with relevant users.

Did you ever rescue your buddy?

  • No, never needed to

    Votes: 18 66.7%
  • Yes, from BO during static in a pool

    Votes: 1 3.7%
  • Yes, from BO during dynamic in a pool

    Votes: 2 7.4%
  • Yes from BO during CW in the sea / lake

    Votes: 6 22.2%
  • No, I was too late / couldn't reach him

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    27

jvoets

New Member
Sep 4, 2001
180
19
0
49
I'm curious to see how often freedivers had to rescue their buddy. If you ever had to, did you know how to do it properly? Waht did you do exactly?
 

crazyfrenchmen

CW = Crazy'n Wet
Oct 17, 2001
185
10
0
48
tiredness

Hi,
actually, i had to help my buddy a couple of time. But it was not from BO but rather from exertion, because of bad cardio/health. Had to pull him to shore. Another kind of rescue i had to do is save someone from his/her fear, when their eyes grow big and they start overbreathing. I did the PADI Rescue diver course and it's really something i would recommend, even for freediver (There are other rescue course specific to freediving or from other scuba organisation that would be as good). A good rescue is not when you have to do CPR, but rather when you dont need to because you recognise the situation before the trouble start .
 

Erik

Well-Known Member
Jan 21, 2001
4,731
753
218
...Absolutely Guss, no problem!
By the way, I had to "rescue" my wife Neeka after a 24 metre dive she did in the Red Sea this summer....she does not really train for freediving, and this was her deepest dive ever. She did not BO, but I could see her face and contractions as she raced the last 10 metres to the surface. She was very out of breath and had panicked. All I had to do was hold her on her back and talk firmly to her for 30 seconds until she relaxed. No worries :)
Cheers,
Erik Y.
 

Abriapnea

New Member
Jan 16, 2002
678
43
0
58
During the period when I was training for competitions my static sessions sparked some interest amongst two of my spearing buddies and they decided to test their abilities .
Unaware of what was happening I went to the pool one afternoon for my training session and found them both simultaneously doing a static at the bottom of the 3 m. pool , with weightbelts on . Seconds after arriving one of them started sambaing . His buddy rushed him to the surface , but was so close to having a samba himself that he couldn't support him and both were in danger of sinking .
Fortunately they were close to the poolside and I could grab them , holding the still spasming diver until he recovered .
 

buddha

Homo Delphinus
Aug 18, 2002
195
8
0
44
BO´s and Sambas

During the Pelizzari´s course, last week, 6 buddies has experienced Blackouts and Sambas... one at the pool, training static apnea and the others training Constant Weight at the sea...
 
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