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Empty Lung Diving

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
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Brian Hamilton

Subsea Sniper
Jun 15, 2003
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I just watched a programme on Discovery Channel where this guy did various activities involving pressure, such as G-force training and freediving.

He got instructed in order to carry out a 31m sled dive. During his warm up routine the guy dived to 6 metres, emptied his lungs and hung around for a little while before surfacing. His trainer said that this helped the mammalian diving reflex kick in a lot quicker.

Have any of you tried this in your everyday diving, whether going for new pb's or not?

Could this technique be use to help the dive reflex kick in quicker?

More importantly is the technique safe enough to be used in everyday recreational diving?

Any thoughts?

Brian
 

Beaky

New Member
Jan 17, 2003
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For a while I have been trying the technique described by Eric Young here to "warm up" before diving. It includes dives like you describe and I think it is pretty effective (but I haven't used it very long, so not entirely conclusive).

I don't think the negative dives are dangerous as long as you are careful and don't push it. You get a very distinct feling in your chest when it happens. If you really empty your lungs all you can, it will come quickly at only a few meters depth, but if you leave a little air, it will come much more gradually and deeper (I usually end up around 6-7 meters). This way you can easily find a comfortable, yet effective depth!

// Johnny
 

cdavis

Well-Known Member
Jan 21, 2003
4,012
782
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Hi Brian

I've very recently added negative preasure dives, 1--15 breaths through my snorkel with the mask off and a very slow relaxed breathup to my routine. It is supposed to kick in the diving reflex. Whatever, it makes a huge difference in dynamic and constant balast. I got the system form a Performance Freediving Clinic. Very good stuff!
 

fpernett

Well-Known Member
Nov 7, 2001
832
102
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Hi Brian,
Empty lung dives before a CW are very useful.
As the other members have said, it makes that diving reflex get sooner and stronger. I use it every time, mainly because I train in cold lakes, and time is gold.
On the other hand, you have to be very carefull with it. As an example, my brother on his training to Cyprus made a lot of empty lung dives to 25-30 mts, with some hanging. He get a very bad lung squeeze that disqualified him to compete in CW.
Try with half lung dives initially, until you feel comfortable, you shouldn't feel pain, if you feel it, stop. When you feel comfortable try to increase the depht. I usually don't go deeper than 15 mts.
I use this techinque too, in the pool but with reverse packing, in a pool of just two meters is incredible the pressure you can simulate.
Always do this with a partner because the higher risk of a BO, specially if you make hangings with it.
 
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