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Freediving fins for scuba?

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
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sian

New Member
Nov 1, 2004
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something went wrong when I tried to post that.... so i'll try again.

basically I started diving last summer both free and scuba and im looking to buy a pair of fins. I want to get Cressi's GARA 3000 as I hear that they are good for scuba when youre diving with a current, more power/less energy wasted etc? is there anyone out there who does this/anyone who can recommend a scuba fin that is good for recreational freediving?

cheers :cool:
 

cdavis

Well-Known Member
Jan 21, 2003
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Hi sian

Freediving fins work great for some types of scuba, although I haven't worn gara 3000's and can't advise on them specificly. If your diving involves much distance swimming (or current), the power and efficiency of longfins is wonderful. However, they are much less manuverable, bulky and hard to handle in tight places, not very suitable for inside caves or wreaks, hi silt, etc. Just depends on what you do. I used to scuba spearfish, covering a lot of ground. Switching from jetfins to rondine gara's (one of the early longfins) was fabulous.

Gara 2000hf's are commonly used by scuba divers in this area.

Connor
 

ash

New Member
Nov 5, 2002
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Hi Sian

I used to use my Gara 2000HF fins for most of my single tank scuba diving. I bought a pair after seeing some divemasters in South Africa using them to make towing a surface marker buoy easier in strong current.

I found them to be far better than most standard scuba fins in terms of power and comfort. My air consumption also immediately drops 10-15% when I switch to them from my Cressi Frogs or my Jet fins.

As Connor mentioned, the longfins are not ideal for getting inside a wreck or for high silt environments.

Cheers

Ash
 

John A

Well-Known Member
Sep 15, 2004
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I would recommend a free diving fins to anyone doing recreational dives (single tanks) That is all I use for reef/wreck diving. I have experienced no problem in wrecks, but you do have to have fin contol and good bouyancy control. I dive (older) cressi gara's and have been for about 10 years.

Tech diving I would not recommend them though (although I have used them for tech in the past) jets will give you better control and more power with doubles and stages.
 

cdavis

Well-Known Member
Jan 21, 2003
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One detail that may or may not be significant. Cressi rondine garas were a couple of inches shorter than gara 2000hfs and , I think, the 3000s are even a little bit longer.

Connor
 

John A

Well-Known Member
Sep 15, 2004
118
13
108
Not to worry, my buddy dives (rec/wreck) with the 3000's and loves them, and I also dive with my H Dessaults on occassion. Unlike some arenas, couple of inches here does not make much of a difference. ;-)
 
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