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H2o2?

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
It can take a long time to get an up-to-date response or contact with relevant users.

Pezman

We pee deep. Ew!
Sep 24, 2002
591
72
118
I stumbled across some literature about the potential benefits of hydrogen peroxide. Here's link that summarizes purported benefits pretty nicely:

http://www.curezone.com/art/read.asp?ID=73&db=5&C0=1

Note that there was a ton of literature about possible hazards of H2O2 as well.

Based on what I've seen, I think that I might try some H202 guzzling experiments. Seems safe enough as long as quantities and duration are limited. Free radical production seems to be one possible hazard.

BTW, please don't let this post inspire you to rush off and drink any of the drugstore stuff -- apparently it has hazardous additives that help keep it stable.
 

efattah

Well-Known Member
Mar 2, 2001
3,294
487
173
Not surprisingly, I have done extensive experiments with H2O2.... hmmmm, come to think of it, I have done experiments with most things....! I will withold my results to avoid contaminating your experiment... Just make sure you use the food grade 35% stuff, no more than 10 drops in a glass of water, several hours after eating and an hour before eating...


Eric Fattah
BC, Canada
 

alastair

Blue Member
Aug 30, 2002
157
33
118
A few extracts from the article that you should bear in mind :

90% conecntration is used as an oxygen source for rocket fuel.

If there is food in the stomach, the reaction of H202 on any bacteria present may cause excess foaming.

H202 is required for the production of thyroid hormone and sexual hormones.

Lactobacillus found in the colon and vagina produce hydrogen peroxide.

:D

A fascinating article. I'm off to the chemist now.

Al
 

alastair

Blue Member
Aug 30, 2002
157
33
118
Some important advice

If you go to the chemist in search of Hydrogen Peroxide, try to avoid that the conversation goes like this :

[Al] Hello, I'm looking for some H2O2

[Chemist] Bleach

[Al] Er... Yes

[Chemist] You want to go blonde?

[Al] No

[Chemist] Aha! You want to disinfect something?

[Al] No, listen I need the kind you can drink

[Chemist] ...

[Al] Don't worry, you can do that

[Chemist] ...

[Al] I know someone who tried it... he can hold his breath for 7 minutes

[Chemist] Please leave or I will call the police


I chose a different approach in the other chemists I visited, but I never found "Food Grade". Did anyone else have better luck?
 

alastair

Blue Member
Aug 30, 2002
157
33
118
Oh, and Eric, what is the difference between common or garden H2O2 (which you seem quite positive about) and the super-oxygenated water (Hyper-O2) that you poo-pooed in my thread the other day?

...apart from the price...

Al
 

Pezman

We pee deep. Ew!
Sep 24, 2002
591
72
118
Can this be right?

I was doing a few calculations on the amount of oxygen that is borne in H202. Here are my calculations, and the figure is so astonishing that I am hoping someone could confirm them or expose me for the decimal-point-misplacing-bone-head I am.

Take 8 oz of 35% H202. Assuming that this figure is % by weight, we have 2.8 oz of H2O2, or 78.4 g of H2O2. Since H2O2 has a molecular weight of 34, this corresponds to 2.3 moles of H2O2. Under ideal conditions, this could be converted to 0.575 moles of O2 and 2.3 moles of H2O. Since an ideal gas occupies 11.2 liters per mole under STP conditions, this is about 2 to 2.5 deep breaths of pure O2, or about 10 breaths of regular air -- enough for at least 10 minutes if you take it easy. Someone like Jersey Jim could stretch it out for at least 15 minutes.

Things are seldom ideal, but it seems that you could extend breath-hold time significantly, even if the conversion efficiency is relatively low.

Can this be right?

I was unable to get H2O2 over the counter, but it seems to be readily available by mail-order.
 

OceanSwimmer

Well-Known Member
Nov 3, 2002
482
69
118
68
Hydrogen Peroxide....

Mike, I'd check the www.scubadoc.com site and ask some questions before drinking the stuff. The OTC brand is 3%. The label states, "avoid swallowing".....dude, I'm worried about you!
Think basic chemistry: your stomach produces hydrochloric acid to begin the digestive process.....your small intestine produces a strong base to complete it. Remember what they said in Chem 1 about mixing acids and bases? :yack
Also, consider your gut has a delicate, capillary rich lining to facilitate the movement of substances across the barrier into your blood....what you think you are ingesting might not be what actually reaches your small intestine. Not to mention, if you ingest something that accidentally burns the lining of your gut, you can get scarring, adhesions, perforation....need I say more?:blackeye Kids who accidentally drink bleach and vomit get burned twice, and often have contractures (shrinkage) of the esophagus as a result of the internal scarring (scar tissue doesn't stretch well)

Hopefully someone who has tried this will post.
 
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