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hood-squeeze..

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
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Pekka

neoprene dreamer
Aug 22, 2001
790
60
118
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I was diving couple of weeks ago and dove to -25m and my ears started to hurt as the hood pressed so hard from outside... like I should have equalized my ears from outside as well..
My friend dove there as well and he let water in his hood to ease the pain.. I don't like that idea, as waters in which I dive most of the times is so cold that.. Well I just don't like the idea..
Any suggestions how to fix that..
Punch a little hole into my suit to let water flow in little bit?? I don't like that idea..
?? I can¡¦t afford to buy new suit.. So help..:confused:
Dive safe
 

derelictp

Freediver
Oct 16, 2001
397
63
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Hello!

I had the same problem when I tried an open-cell inside suit!

Some people makes a hole through the suit as you said.

I don't have the problem with my gold coating inside or lycra inside.

I belive the only way is:

1. Let water enter the outer ear, I suggest you try fill it up with warm water before you enter the cold water.

2. Make a hole!

I don't like the idea either......

Maybe some open cell users have some good advice?
 
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Jon

Dairyland diver
Supporter
Apr 7, 2001
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I let the water into my hood to help me equalize- even when ice diving!

My ice cap, that I wear under my regular wetsuit hood in the winter time, has small slits cut into the side of it where your ears go.

Jon
 
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unirdna

tropical wuss
Sep 16, 2002
1,016
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I'm feelin' ya Pekka

I get the same thing happening to me all the time. Unforturnately, the only remedy I've found is to do the afore mentioned; let the water in. I don't like hoods in general. They are one more equalization blocker to deal with, and I think that the pressure imbalance hoods can cause has a greater effect on me (use BTV) than Jon (uses Frenzel). I relish the warm months when I don't have to wear one (unless I'm venturing below the thermocline).

Suck it up buttercup, it's the only way :D.

Ted
 
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basco

New Member
Dec 7, 2001
74
1
0
I have also had the problem with the suit squeezing on my ears and I didn't want to let in any cold water. I have now solved the problem though. What I did was that I took two pieces of nylon that I ripped from some neoprene-samples from eliossub(any textile would probably work though). Then I glued it with neoprene-glue to the inside of my hood. The two pieces were about as large as my ears and reached to about 1 cm from the end of the hood towards the face.

This makes the water travel to my ears in the nylon, and some air can flow in the nylon too. At the time the water reaches my ears, it's warm. Another advantage is that when I surface, the water frows out from my ears, and I can hear perfectly.

Vacuum in between the suit and the ears can cause quite nasty problems, so I recommend you fix the problem.
 

Adrian

Deeper Blue Beachcomber
Supporter
Nov 23, 2002
2,691
533
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I let water into the hood, but the coldest I have been diving in is 12 C. Nothing compared to you guys. The water does warm up very quickly though and I would have thought that it'd happen even with colder water. No dice huh?:hmm

Adrian
 
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Pekka

neoprene dreamer
Aug 22, 2001
790
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Thanks...
Well I thought about glueing some material inside my hood.. I guess I gotta do that...
Thanks for advice! Good carma to you all:cool:
 

basco

New Member
Dec 7, 2001
74
1
0
the problem with cold water in your ears it that with time, you will build up cartilage in your ears, lowering your hearing
 

OceanSwimmer

Well-Known Member
Nov 3, 2002
482
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...cold water in the ears....

..okay, being the perpetual nurse, I saw the note here that mentions the connection between cold water exposure and ear-problems. It isn't cartiladge build-up. it's bone! The medical term is exostosis. The cure, when it gets to the point of affecting your hearing, is to go in and have it drilled out. Yes, it's true. The doc uses a high-speed drill and reams out the extra boney layer, thus widening the ear canal, returning it to it's normal diameter.
I think the post-op requirement for dryness is about 3-4 weeks (someone here in DB has probably had this done, should know...)
--The best advice is to avoid it if you can, get the ears fixed when you need it and don't wait until you're deaf....

Dive safe!
 

basco

New Member
Dec 7, 2001
74
1
0
ah, of course it's bone. Otherwise the archaeologists couldn't have noted it on the sculls of the ancient divers of our world.. thanks doc
 

OceanSwimmer

Well-Known Member
Nov 3, 2002
482
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ancient skulls....!

....I didn't know this about the findings on the skulls; it makes perfect sense! Where did you read about this, basco? I'm interested....I realize it's off topic, so PM me if you like. Thanks!
OS
 

basco

New Member
Dec 7, 2001
74
1
0
I once saw a documentary on swedish television about people living in the mountains. I don't really remember where they lived, but I think it was South America or something. They tought that the people made dives as deep as 30 meters in the cold water coming down from the mountains. Without any suit or anything. And their proof of this was the bone build-up in their ears.
Maybe run a search on the net? I'll get back to you if I remember any more of it.
 

A Brownsword

Well-Known Member
Mar 25, 2002
102
3
108
Kirk Krack suggested using a little cotton in each ear. This lets the ear still flood but tends to hold the same water in place allowing it to warm up. This helps prevent cold water bone growth and is more comfortable when you punch holes in your hood (or whatever other method you use). We dive in 6o C (@surface) water in the winter so it is an issue for us.
 

Jon

Dairyland diver
Supporter
Apr 7, 2001
4,080
473
188
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Don't the Pro Plug's by Doc's work the same way as the cotton?

I thought that they worked by letting the water in and allowing it to warm up and stay there.

Jon
 

icarus pacific

Human-in-training
Nov 7, 2001
2,880
212
0
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otis extrena...

Here's the deal- take a nail, a 16d as in the kind you build a house with, not your fingernail. (Unless your a hottie in which case PM me... ;) ) and heat the thing up over a flame. I've found using pliers whilst doing this helps the stubbys. :blackeye

Poke a hole in the top-most portion of your hood. The hole isn't big enough (2-3mm) to let a raging torrent in and what does get in stays trapped and warms up soon enough. This also lets the air that you let out of the mask skirt with clearing, squinting and mask pumping :inlove that sits up in that zone making you look like a conehead, out. Think of it as a poor-man's purge vent. Done deal.

Ear bones, or surfer's ear or otis externa is a major pain to develop and will make you want to just ask for the attending physician to develop a quick method of hiding your body if you have to have serious work done there. Think catheter without being out, lubed or interested in the Nurse. Yeah... pain.


sven
 
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