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How do you attract fish?

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Etienne Spiteri

Member
Jan 19, 2016
61
18
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I fish in seas where fish is really difficult to bring into range...

I have noticed without a sliver of doubt, that the larger the fish, the more 'intelligent' it seems to be! I mean I have really fine tuned my duck dive & aspetto tehnique. Now I no longer scare away the small fish and a small selection of seabream & mullet seem to not mind me at the bottom...however its a different story with the larger examples...they are not attracted to me, to the contrary they seem to feel my presence and slowly swim away in the distance...

I know local spearfishers use many different techniques to try and attract them close...some of which:

- Stone throw method (Throw a stone, dive and wait for the fish close to where the stone landed)
- Scratching bottom with the knife
- Scratching bottom with gloves
- Making sounds with throat (oesopahgus?)

I am really keen into learning some of these or other techniques as spear fishers around here are very tight lipped. Well I live on an over populated rock of an island with clear crystal seas with plenty of swimmers and I have no boat. So fish are scarce. Target fish are bream, mullet, seabass, amberjack etc... in crystal clear waters in 3-12m depths. Anyone care to offer some advice?
 
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Pinniped72

Pinniped72

Well-Known Member
May 18, 2013
404
217
83
Crystal clear water, why not try spinners/flashers, it might be worth a go, search this forum, SA spearo posted some excellent stuff not that long back detailing the flashers he uses, it was really good ;)
 
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mariusshobo

Well-Known Member
Sep 22, 2013
205
66
68
Bigger fishes are more expirienced, more carefull, that's the reason they grow big!

If you can see the fish, it's pretty sure that it can see you. If you move on the bottom, then you are a possible predator; if you don't, then you are a curiosity. Make them curious by doing nothing and they will come in range to investigate. At least that's how I do it.

You've said:
to the contrary they seem to feel my presence and slowly swim away in the distance...
Check this:
- there is not enough time on the bottom in order to let the fishes to investigate you to the point that they become bold enough to come closer;
- when see the big fish, you became agitated: make suddenly moves, heart rate increase, move your head in the direction of the fish and stare at it; try not to and see if it works;
 
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Etienne Spiteri

Member
Jan 19, 2016
61
18
23
37
Bigger fishes are more expirienced, more carefull, that's the reason they grow big!

If you can see the fish, it's pretty sure that it can see you. If you move on the bottom, then you are a possible predator; if you don't, then you are a curiosity. Make them curious by doing nothing and they will come in range to investigate. At least that's how I do it.

You've said:

Check this:
- there is not enough time on the bottom in order to let the fishes to investigate you to the point that they become bold enough to come closer;
- when see the big fish, you became agitated: make suddenly moves, heart rate increase, move your head in the direction of the fish and stare at it; try not to and see if it works;

Thanks for very helpful reply :)...

Yes that is what I have figured...older & wiser!

I think that I should really work on keeping my calm. When I see a big fish it is possible that unknowingly my HR goes up and maybe my reactions becomes a little too abrupt. Am working on it.

I also fish from land as I have no boat. An experienced fisherman told me that near land, on our tiny island the fish are super careful & very afraid due to all the disturbance they face, so I shall find some reefs off land...but this is only possible with a boat.
 
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mariusshobo

Well-Known Member
Sep 22, 2013
205
66
68
You are right all the way.
I have noticed that sargos are almoust impossible to catch in areas with constant spearos; I've been also told that they learn.
This year I've been in Chalkidiki with a boat and access remote fishing areas, and it was much easier.
As for keeping calm, it's true also. I did some test dives to see the place, and I was surrounded by fishes. Got super excited, took my gun from the boat but when I've got back in the water in "killing mode", frustration.

I think that I should really work on keeping my calm.
I am kinda agitated guy and work constantly to be calm. Here is my trick; I don't concentrate to (desperatly) catch fish, I redirect my attention to safety of the dive, technique, beutiful surroundings, etc. It works preatty good. And if there are no fish at the end of the day, then at least there are nice memories!
 
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Andrew Fogarty

Andrew Fogarty

Active Member
May 17, 2016
63
40
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Dam that sounds hard to get a shot. Your best chance to get within range is to dive in an area where the fish are feeding, we call these pressure points or zones where current brings food to the bait fish (filter feeders) and the hunters are looking to cash in on distracted prey. Scavengers can be attracted by offering bait to influence behaviour and hunger is the downfall of many good fish. We use a technique where we spear a small fish at first and place it under a ledge and the hunters like grouper come out to investigate the opportunity of an easy meal. The more time you spend in the environment the more attuned you will become to the fish there. Relaxing is very important as you have already mentioned, but learning specific and unique methods of overriding the wariness of spooky fish is the real challenge in a high pressure area. Good luck.:hungry:
 
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Etienne Spiteri

Member
Jan 19, 2016
61
18
23
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That is all very interesting to read and learn...Andrew it doesn't just sound hard. It truly is.

Mariusshobo you are 100% correct on the common sea bream (sarago)! It is the one I struggle to spear the most, along with the gilthead sea bream (orata)...the 'large' (500g+) examples are super sensitive and will not come to within 8m of a loaded gun....

No amount of aspetto will bring them in. Also scraping the sea floor (say with knife) to make some noise works against you rather than in favour for them...where for example a sea bass or parrot fish comes straight at you.

Andrew as you well say, I have noted that the few ones I have managed to spear where too busy digging in the bottom or looking for prey where there is a concentration of small fish.

Also in the family, of hard to get fish must be the Salpa. The group just vanishes as long as one of them acts doubtful. The duck dive must be done at least 20m away from the group and approach them with a super slow agguato, preferably behind rocks.

I have speared a couple of small (1kg) grouper and they are easy as they tend to sit under a rock, one of them was chasing a small octopus I found in her mouth after I shot her. I almost feel sorry for small grouper as I know they grow so large, but in my 15m limit I never got to see any larger than that.
 
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mariusshobo

Well-Known Member
Sep 22, 2013
205
66
68
When it comes to fishing, nobody is 100% right. Keep us posted with your progress.
I'm stuck in the office for the next 3 weeks ... sh--t!
 
MAKO Spearguns

MAKO Spearguns

MAKO1
Mar 22, 2009
717
211
148
We offer a whole selection of flashers.

http://www.makospearguns.com/Fish-Flashers-Kits-Accessories-s/101.htm

since you are swimming off the beach, you may not want to pull a full size flasher rig. We offer this compact kit:
http://www.makospearguns.com/Self-Contained-Mini-Fish-Flasher-Kit-p/mscmffk.htm

MSCMFFK-2T.jpg


We also offer an even simpler option: throw flashers-
http://www.makospearguns.com/Throw-Flashers-p/mtf.htm
MTF-2T.jpg





 
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D

doyenofcastle

Well-Known Member
Oct 30, 2012
230
15
58
there is one thing I tried by mistake and it work very well ,forget to switch off the small cave flash light ,it attract the fish from far ,flasher will work too but flash light more bright
 
Dydimo

Dydimo

Active Member
Feb 6, 2015
28
31
28
38
Try throwing a spoon. You can experiment with bending it different ways to make it spin more and sink slower. It can be very effective on predatory fish especially, but you may be surprised at the amount of smaller fish that come to investigate too.
 
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Natural Selection

Natural Selection

Active Member
Sep 23, 2015
70
25
33
35
Throw anything out there, but shiny is best. I once drew in a big barracuda with a brick on a rope. Or you can try chumming. Doesn't work as well for ground fish, but I've had plenty of luck chumming for fish
within the water column.
 
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E

Etienne Spiteri

Member
Jan 19, 2016
61
18
23
37
there is one thing I tried by mistake and it work very well ,forget to switch off the small cave flash light ,it attract the fish from far ,flasher will work too but flash light more bright

Doesn't work over here I've tried it...fish here just dart off if they see a flashlight in their face...
 
M

manoliskamenakis

New Member
Jul 22, 2021
7
2
3
53
That is all very interesting to read and learn...Andrew it doesn't just sound hard. It truly is.

Mariusshobo you are 100% correct on the common sea bream (sarago)! It is the one I struggle to spear the most, along with the gilthead sea bream (orata)...the 'large' (500g+) examples are super sensitive and will not come to within 8m of a loaded gun....

No amount of aspetto will bring them in. Also scraping the sea floor (say with knife) to make some noise works against you rather than in favour for them...where for example a sea bass or parrot fish comes straight at you.

Andrew as you well say, I have noted that the few ones I have managed to spear where too busy digging in the bottom or looking for prey where there is a concentration of small fish.

Also in the family, of hard to get fish must be the Salpa. The group just vanishes as long as one of them acts doubtful. The duck dive must be done at least 20m away from the group and approach them with a super slow agguato, preferably behind rocks.

I have speared a couple of small (1kg) grouper and they are easy as they tend to sit under a rock, one of them was chasing a small octopus I found in her mouth after I shot her. I almost feel sorry for small grouper as I know they grow so large, but in my 15m limit I never got to see any larger than that.
I am not an experienced spearo but in order to get fish to come to you you should satisfy 2 of their needs
1. hunger (ground bait-small baitfish killed, broken sea urchins, etc - 90% success) 2 curiosity (flashers, grunting, dusting , etc---- 10% success)
 
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