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Is there a category for deep diving records without using goggles, fins or weights etc

deepfrost

New Member
Nov 10, 2017
1
1
1
64
Australia
#1
I can't find any reference on the internet for a category of deep diving where a diver uses no external equipment whatsoever, not even ear plugs.
I reckon this would be a very interesting category for deep diving records.
An ordinary mens or womens swimming suit is of course acceptable.
But then again, maybe nudists could set up a Nude Deep Diving Competition.
 

efattah

Well-Known Member
Mar 2, 2001
3,294
456
173
BC, Canada
www.fluidgoggles.com
#4
In 2008 at the vertical blue competition I did 67m/220ft with no air (exhale), no wetsuit, no goggles, no nose clip. I did use a monofin. If you disallow all equipment the record is -81m/266ft by Sebastien Murat of Australia, done around 2005. Exhale dive, no fins, no mask, no goggles, no nose clip, no wetsuit.
 

Jellythings

Supporter
Supporter
Oct 5, 2017
44
5
28
Central FL
#5
I have always wanted to try going down with "nothing" but have felt nervous about "the unknown..." I am extremely attached to my equipment. I am going to take some baby steps with it climbing up and down the line the next time I hit the water. Well, wetsuit is staying on this time of year ;) Thanks for the motivation to knock me out of the comfort zone!
 

efattah

Well-Known Member
Mar 2, 2001
3,294
456
173
BC, Canada
www.fluidgoggles.com
#6
I have always wanted to try going down with "nothing" but have felt nervous about "the unknown..." I am extremely attached to my equipment. I am going to take some baby steps with it climbing up and down the line the next time I hit the water. Well, wetsuit is staying on this time of year ;) Thanks for the motivation to knock me out of the comfort zone!
I did 80.5m/263ft, in 3'05" in Vancouver in winter with no wetsuit, the water was 5C/41F, so cold water is no excuse to dive without a wetsuit. On the contrary, it is lovely to feel the water flowing over your skin, and getting this feeling in the middle of winter gives a great feeling of power over the elements.
 
Likes: skinnydipper

Jellythings

Supporter
Supporter
Oct 5, 2017
44
5
28
Central FL
#7
I did 80.5m/263ft, in 3'05" in Vancouver in winter with no wetsuit, the water was 5C/41F, so cold water is no excuse to dive without a wetsuit. On the contrary, it is lovely to feel the water flowing over your skin, and getting this feeling in the middle of winter gives a great feeling of power over the elements.
The middle of winter I've always known is like 20c/68f water with 27c/80f days! I will never complain of the "cold" here again. Now I gotta chart the temps at my favorite spot and take a free-freedive at the end of my sessions. How cold will it go this year? Thanks again. Fighting the boredom of routine can be tough and these ideas are great!
 

Pinniped72

Well-Known Member
May 18, 2013
390
204
58
Hampshire
#8
Doing anything in the sea with minimal equipment can sometimes be good for kerbing the old ego, to remember that the sea can eat you up and spit you out in the blink of an eye. Over confidence is as deadly as ignorance, in my opinion (y)
 
Likes: J Campbell

noa

Well-Known Member
Oct 17, 2003
438
120
133
47
Crete Greece
Visit site
#9
I did 80.5m/263ft, in 3'05" in Vancouver in winter with no wetsuit, the water was 5C/41F, so cold water is no excuse to dive without a wetsuit. On the contrary, it is lovely to feel the water flowing over your skin, and getting this feeling in the middle of winter gives a great feeling of power over the elements.
Why is it that the vast majority of freedivers rely religiously on wetsuits. Even when diving in ridiculously warm waters above 25c ?
I always found being confined in a rubber suit, shutting me off from contact with the water so contrary to "free" diving.
 
Likes: HLanger1955
May 17, 2013
80
11
23
Italy
#10
Why is it that the vast majority of freedivers rely religiously on wetsuits. Even when diving in ridiculously warm waters above 25c ?
I always found being confined in a rubber suit, shutting me off from contact with the water so contrary to "free" diving.
I agree. BTW as I'm often use the lunch break for some short dive in the sea I cannot bring along much gear...
 

J Campbell

Well-Known Member
Sep 17, 2001
406
94
133
63
Annapolis, MD, USA
#11
Unless I'm in exceptionally warm water (90 degrees) I will get cold when freediving. And for me, cold means less relaxed and shorter breath hold time. When I freedive I spend alot of time motionless; slow easy breathe-up followed by slow relaxed movements underwater - I don't generate alot of heat. So I need a wetsuit and then I need weights to counteract the wetsuit. But I agree, when ever I'm done with a dive session I like to strip down to just me, my speedo, and goggles and feel the total freedom of unrestricted movement underwater.
 

noa

Well-Known Member
Oct 17, 2003
438
120
133
47
Crete Greece
Visit site
#12
Unless I'm in exceptionally warm water (90 degrees) I will get cold when freediving. And for me, cold means less relaxed and shorter breath hold time. When I freedive I spend alot of time motionless; slow easy breathe-up followed by slow relaxed movements underwater - I don't generate alot of heat. So I need a wetsuit and then I need weights to counteract the wetsuit. But I agree, when ever I'm done with a dive session I like to strip down to just me, my speedo, and goggles and feel the total freedom of unrestricted movement underwater.
All very true. And it's all, always, a matter of personal style and preference.
My own way is to opt for fewer dives (If I really get cold), but enjoy the ones I do in the way I like to do them. As in, a swimsuit and a noseclip. That allows me the closest connection to the whole experience.
Also, it's been by now well proven and documented, that one adapts to what one gets exposed to. Both physiologicly, and even more so psychologicly.
If one always shields themselves from the elements, one will always be sensitive to them. On the other hand progressive exposure will yield to a certain degree of adaptation.
 

J Campbell

Well-Known Member
Sep 17, 2001
406
94
133
63
Annapolis, MD, USA
#13
noa --> "Also, it's been by now well proven and documented, that one adapts to what one gets exposed to. Both physiologicly, and even more so psychologicly. " I agree with this. The pool where I practice is 82 degrees. I often skip the wet suit and enjoy a half hour or so of natural diving. But after awhile I sometimes start to actually shiver. Then begrudgingly I don the wetsuit and continue. Hopefully if I continue doing natural dives I will adapt to longer and longer times before I get cold.
 

noa

Well-Known Member
Oct 17, 2003
438
120
133
47
Crete Greece
Visit site
#14
Exactly. As an open water swimmer that swims year round without wetsuit ( aka swim condom) I can attest to progressive adaptation.
When continuing frequent water exposure after the summer ends, I find myself swimming just as comfortably in the middle of winter.
Of course the waters I swim in are not cold.
They range from 27-28 celcius at the peak of summer (which is actually uncomfortably hot for swimming) to 15c at their coldest in the winter.
Same for diving. Much less heat is generated compared to swimming, but with adaptation and some technique tweaks I dive in the winter just in a swimsuit.
 
Apr 11, 2018
82
7
13
47
New York
#15
Exactly. As an open water swimmer that swims year round without wetsuit ( aka swim condom) I can attest to progressive adaptation.
When continuing frequent water exposure after the summer ends, I find myself swimming just as comfortably in the middle of winter.
Of course the waters I swim in are not cold.
They range from 27-28 celcius at the peak of summer (which is actually uncomfortably hot for swimming) to 15c at their coldest in the winter.
Same for diving. Much less heat is generated compared to swimming, but with adaptation and some technique tweaks I dive in the winter just in a swimsuit.
Such a lucky man to live in an area where you can swim year round! *Green with envy* :wacky:
 
Apr 11, 2018
82
7
13
47
New York
#16
noa --> "Also, it's been by now well proven and documented, that one adapts to what one gets exposed to. Both physiologicly, and even more so psychologicly. " I agree with this. The pool where I practice is 82 degrees. I often skip the wet suit and enjoy a half hour or so of natural diving. But after awhile I sometimes start to actually shiver. Then begrudgingly I don the wetsuit and continue. Hopefully if I continue doing natural dives I will adapt to longer and longer times before I get cold.
You can do it...my swimming season is almost over unless i join an indoor pool but in NY they are very "Gestapo" about breath-holding...
 
May 17, 2013
80
11
23
Italy
#19
I did 80.5m/263ft, in 3'05" in Vancouver in winter with no wetsuit, the water was 5C/41F, so cold water is no excuse to dive without a wetsuit. On the contrary, it is lovely to feel the water flowing over your skin, and getting this feeling in the middle of winter gives a great feeling of power over the elements.
I wonder whever you had a buddy around at these temperatures :)