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Muscle Capillarization and mitochondrial enzymes

xristos

Well-Known Member
Sep 5, 2013
102
29
68
Greece
Does increased muscle capillarization and mitochondrial enzymes hinder freediving performance? It is adaptations that runners cyclists etc have.
 
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SDS

Member
Feb 16, 2018
21
19
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34
Belgium
I don't see that many problems with increased capillarization. In fact, improved endothelial function (I know, not the same as capillary content you were referring to) through aerobic training may potentially improve the vasoconstriction component of the mammalian dive reflex.
Greater mitochondrial content, enzyme concentrations, and enzymatic activity on the other hand...
 
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xristos

xristos

Well-Known Member
Sep 5, 2013
102
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68
Greece
Don't leave me hanging like that, you think mitochondrial content, enzyme concentrations and enzymatic activity hinder freediving performance? How does this happen in your view ? Thanks SDS :bookworm:
 

SDS

Member
Feb 16, 2018
21
19
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34
Belgium
Haha, sorry about that :)
I do believe that a solid aerobic base is required for (i) a longer period of peak performance in your periodisation and (ii) to better recover from streneous high-intensity interval sessions.
High metabolic activity in the muscle at rest (during static and you could say to some extent during free immersion) would not be expected to improve performance, would it (higher O2 consumption at rest is not what you want as a freediver)?
That being sad, note that high-intensity interval training also increases muscle capillarization and mitochondrial content - but it is reasonable to postulate that it superiorly increases your pH-handling capacity as well as the capacity to yield ATP in hypoxic conditions ('anaerobic' glycolysis) as compared to moderate-intensity endurance training.
A logical suggestion would be to work on a good aerobic base in the beginning of the season and then start training at high intensities (either or not whilst holding your breath). But there are other more experienced people who might give you a better answer to your question...
Cheers
 
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xristos

xristos

Well-Known Member
Sep 5, 2013
102
29
68
Greece
Real wealth of knowledge thanks lots for sharing mate. Now need to process and study.
Haha, sorry about that :)
I do believe that a solid aerobic base is required for (i) a longer period of peak performance in your periodisation and (ii) to better recover from streneous high-intensity interval sessions.
High metabolic activity in the muscle at rest (during static and you could say to some extent during free immersion) would not be expected to improve performance, would it (higher O2 consumption at rest is not what you want as a freediver)?
That being sad, note that high-intensity interval training also increases muscle capillarization and mitochondrial content - but it is reasonable to postulate that it superiorly increases your pH-handling capacity as well as the capacity to yield ATP in hypoxic conditions ('anaerobic' glycolysis) as compared to moderate-intensity endurance training.
A logical suggestion would be to work on a good aerobic base in the beginning of the season and then start training at high intensities (either or not whilst holding your breath). But there are other more experienced people who might give you a better answer to your question...
Cheers
That's a wealth of knowledge now I need to process and study :bookworm:
Thanks a lot SDS
:shame:
 
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Nathan Vinski

Well-Known Member
Apr 19, 2015
247
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Canada
Does increased muscle capillarization and mitochondrial enzymes hinder freediving performance? It is adaptations that runners cyclists etc have.

I think the answer is in the question..

Forget about (muscle capillarization and mitochondrial enzymes) and just think specifically about the demands of the sports.

running and cycling (assuming long distance here) requires MAXIMUM blood flow to the muscles & MAXIMUM O2 consumption in the muscles to sustain the effort for a long period of time.

Freediving (maximal efforts) requires the opposite.. MINIMUM blood flow to the muscles & MINIMUM 02 consumption in the muscles to sustain brain function during periods of low arterial saO2 and ppO2.

We know that sport-fitness = Specific Adaptation To Imposed demand.. The imposed demand of long distance running/cycling is very, very different than the demand of a deep/long freedive.

--

I do agree however, that a minimum level of aerobic fitness is necessary for the reasons that @SDS mentioned. But there's an 'Enough-is-Enough' factor here.. Having a decent 5k time will probably help your freediving.. But being able to do a <3hr Marathon probably isn't going to help your freediving all that much.

But the same can be said about anaerobic fitness.. A minimum level of strength is required to freedive effectively. Lets make up numbers trying to be relatively accurate.. Having a 1.5x body-weight squat will help your freediving a lot.. Will training to Squat 350kg?? Probably not.

If you want to be "needle moving" focus on the strength/anaerobic work, and maintain a healthy level of aerobic fitness..
 
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