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Nemrod Comando Speargun Parts

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okieman1

New Member
Aug 6, 2009
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I have three (blue) Nerod Comando Spearguns that I've used since the 1960's
I have always been able to fix / repair them, but now I'm needing the piston seals.(two per piston) (small boot seal) I've been told they're obsolete but surely someone has some still. If you know of a source please advise. I just hate not being able to use these guns anymore, they're my favorite and have taken untold numbers of fish

Thanks
 
popgun pete

popgun pete

Well-Known Member
Jul 30, 2008
4,538
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Even if you could find some unused spare pistons the rubber in the multi-ribbed seals will have aged by now unless it was protected in some way. Oxygen attacks rubber over time and it reverts, losing its mechanical strength. The Nemrod "Silver series" piston (the "Comando" was the smallest model in the range) is a composite unit made up of various small metal parts clamped together on a central steel spine. To take the piston apart you have to machine or file the rear end off (it is peened over) in order to unscrew the mushroom head shaped tail section and then pull the blue anodised aluminium cup sections off the steel spine to remove the two rubber seals. As far as I know these rubber seals were never sold as spare parts, the idea was you replaced the entire piston, so disassembling the piston was not much use beyond helping to confirm what the seals actually looked like after being removed from the piston.

Your other option is to have the pistons rebuilt using "O" rings which will mean making entirely new parts for the piston centre section or using the pistons from some other brand of pneumatic that will fit the gun. That is easier said than done as not only is the piston diameter critical the tail shape has to hook safely on the Nemrod gun's sear lever. Most of these old guns have been retired due to lack of spare parts. My first small pneumatic speargun was a "Comando" and the piston seals eventually went soft and made the gun very sluggish to shoot, even though they still held compressed air. I found a new old stock piston for it, but the ribbed rubber seals were already degraded after decades of sitting forgotten in a parts box at the dive shop.
 
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okieman1

New Member
Aug 6, 2009
10
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Thanks for the feed back Popgun Pete, you are correct concerning the shelf life of rubber seals. That is if they haven't been sealed and stored properly. However I've purchased and replaced these ribbed seals many times over the last 41 years. I found some about 5 years ago but now need more. Our local dive shop carried these ribbed seals and had a supplier source up to about 15 years ago. I have three of these guns and just thought I'd try and keep one breathing a little longer. So if anyone knows of someone that has some rat holed please let me know.
I've tried o-rings with mixed results, not really the best fix unless the piston re-designed.

Thanks
 
popgun pete

popgun pete

Well-Known Member
Jul 30, 2008
4,538
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Interesting to learn that you were able to source the piston rubber seals separately over such a long period of time. Maybe you could try and find out who actually manufactured those seals (a sub-contractor?) as Nemrod may not have been the only user of them. Nemrod were eventually acquired by Metzler, then the Nemrod brand virtually disappeared from the dive scene.
 
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okieman1

New Member
Aug 6, 2009
10
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Pop gun Pete, I believe they were just left over inventory that my local shop had. This gun was very popular in the 60's thru 80's in my area. I had bought up several sets of seals and kept them sealed up stored in a cool, dry & dark area. I spent some time today working with one of my guns and I believe I've got one going again. It hasn't leaked off all day and if it doesn't overnight I do believe I've resurected it once more. However I believe its time to start shopping for a new one. Any suggestions on a good pneumatic gun in the same size as the Nemrod Commando. I noticed most newer gun have the handle / trigger at the far end, bummer :rcard. That was what I liked about the Nemrod its handle was in the middle and very well ballanced. Anyway any suggestion will be appreciated.:)

Thanks
 
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popgun pete

popgun pete

Well-Known Member
Jul 30, 2008
4,538
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Mid-handle pneumatic spearguns have virtually disappeared in the West in deference to rear handle pneumatics based on the Italian "Sten" as they are all virtually clones of that gun's design. They are cheaper to make as they require less component parts than a mid-handle pneumatic speargun, plus they float like corks without the spear due to the use of plastic bulkheads at either end of the much longer pressure chamber. If you still want a mid-handle pneumatic speargun then the only "new" gun available today is the Russian "Seabear" (now called the "Orion"), but they are very heavy guns for their size as they are virtually all metal construction. A guy in the US sells them on-line as well as the inferior mid-handle "Prism", but I would not recommend one of the latter.

Unless you want to fish in tight places and really need a non-floating gun I recommend one of the shorter Stens (or one of the many clones available from other brands). The Mares "Cyrano 550" is about the same length as the Mares "Ministen", but does not float due to its elongated "Cyrano De Bergerac" nose cone doing away with some of the forward buoyancy. It is very accurate for its size. These short guns can be easily loaded off your thigh, same as the "Comando", and will do much the same job, but they are slightly shorter than the "Comando" in terms of their inner barrel length and shoot thinner spears, hence have less punch. The "Comando" was called the "mighty midget" when it first came out. Such guns would be too expensive to produce today, at least in the Western economies.
 
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okieman1

New Member
Aug 6, 2009
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My Nermrod held pressure overnight and seems to be working again. I'll find out this coming week at the lake. What's the opion on the Cressi-Sub SL line of guns. Are they worth the investment or should I go with another brand? I've conceded in buying another gun w/ rear handle in the 32" length size for a back up just in case my nemrod die's again.
I like the shorter guns because I hunt in rocks and tight places for large Flat Head Catfish. These dudes get big so I need a gun with some punch.

Thanks again,
 
popgun pete

popgun pete

Well-Known Member
Jul 30, 2008
4,538
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The Cressi-sub SL line of guns is just one of the many clones (probably from the same sub-contractor factory!), only it has a non-concentric inner barrel located slightly higher up in the body tube. They have been around for years, undergoing a colour scheme change every now and then. Most of the other brands have an inner barrel concentric with the body tank. I have used both and there is no noticeable difference in how they shoot. I prefer the Mares "Sten" as that is the first rear handle model that I bought, in fact I preferred the old style rounded finger grip handle on the original model, but the latest model is quite acceptable (more versatile with respect to varying hand size). If you want to lose your loader then store it in the butt like they say on the Mares instructions, the cord loop on the loader will soon catch on something and whip it out when you least expect it, especially when grubbing around near the bottom.

In a short gun you do not really need the SL's power regulator, so the Cressi "Star" single power model is the one to get. Short spears are harder to bend and you can pump the gun up to your maximum loading ability as loading off your thigh gives the best body position to ram the shaft in. I really do not have to tell you this after all your years with the "Comando", plus it is a single power gun, same as the "Star", only you will have to settle for an 8 mm diameter spear instead of the Nemrod's 9 mm diameter spear.
 
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tensor

New Member
Apr 17, 2011
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Okieman1,

My father bought me a Nemrod "Commando" spear gun 45 years ago; I used it today. It is a wonderful tool. However, the darn thing needs maintenance every couple of years or so. For example, if you do not properly store the machine in a downward position with diminished pressure, you shall lose your rubber seals. After the first ten years, I no longer trusted the seals; so, I ordered a bag of five seals from Nemrod. Every ten years I replaced the seals [the "Commando" is easily disassembled] even though the seals were still perfect. I am now out of original manufacture seals.

I have a display wall of spear guns and other weapons for purposes of art. The Nemrod "Commando" is the only spear gun I actually use. If the darn company were still around, I could do a commercial endorsement.

You must re-engineer the piston seal system. Get yourself a digital caliper from Harbor Freight. That costs about $13; you will use it for everything requiring precision. Measure in English, not Metric, even though the original system design is Metric. You may need to get a Metric 6mm/1mm die or tap to fix the push rod of the air pump. Replace the failed/neglected seals with precision faucet seals from Ace Hardware.

The pressure in my 45 year old Nemrod "Commando" spear gun, stored vertically downward and [deliberately diminished pressure for storage, as per manufacturer instructions] has outperformed and outlasted its competition on my display wall.

I would make an offer for your three, but I only need one [which I have]. Let me know if I have helped you in your restoration of the seals. Also, why do you have three? Do you have three arms? You are a dealer; find a good home for these tools, my friend.

tensor
 
popgun pete

popgun pete

Well-Known Member
Jul 30, 2008
4,538
1,290
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This is an old thread, but interesting to read that you have found some suitable rubber seals for the Nemrod piston. Any chance of a photo of them? Although a minor detail, the spelling of the gun's name is actually "Comando", not the familiar word with two m's as we usually see it in English. The metalized name stickers in silver and black on the body tube were not long lived and eventually the remnants were usually pulled off when they began to curl at the edges as the adhesive progressively failed.
 
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tensor

New Member
Apr 17, 2011
7
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popgun pete,

I am sorry you think I misspelled "commando"; maybe I have. I rely on the spell checker incorporated somewhere within. However, English persons call the Nemrod model I have "Commando" and they show pictures. When I was a kid, the "Commando" looked very much as a pistol which strapped to one's ankel. Dad bought me the next size up; the "Fusil". 45 years later, I do remember the "Commando" in the Key West scuba shop; but now everyone calls the "Fusil" the "Commando". Maybe fusil is Spanish for commando. I am simply trying to communicate with the year old thread; all these guns had the same 6mm id/12mm od rings. The material used in these rings is identical to that used in grommets. Junk! Use the precision rubber faucet washers which come in 1/64 inch graduations. Use one size smaller than numerical metric, as the diameter expands under assembly compression. Incidentally, in the Ace Hardware rubber faucet packages, the metric measurement is in extremely fine print and is approximate. Use the caliper.

As I suggested, measure with a digital caliper. The rings cost 79 cents each.

You do not need a picture. Would you like a part number instead?

tensor
 
popgun pete

popgun pete

Well-Known Member
Jul 30, 2008
4,538
1,290
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The sticker on the gun said "Comando" and that is how it is spelled in the Nemrod adverts, along with the names of the other three longer models in the "Silver" series. I bought one of the first ones out here as they came in to replace the previous model, which I had actually ordered, but the "Comando" turned up instead. I was not complaining as the new gun seemed to be a big improvement.

Attached is a photo of my old piston in pieces and a new "old" one I picked up about a year ago. Note the later piston has a stainless steel nose. The rear seal on the old piston went soft and "smeared", the front seal chipped some of the ribs off. The inner one sat in oil, but the outer one may have had less lubrication as it did not go soft and developed cracks instead.
 

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  • Nemrod Silver series piston.JPG
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tensor

New Member
Apr 17, 2011
7
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popgun pete,

Trust me that 40-45 years ago Nemrod made a spear gun that strapped to the diver's part of the leg nearest the ankle. It was about half the length of the "Fusil". I did not want it. My father understood that I did not want it, as he was a surgeon. The model was called "Commando" in America. I wanted the sawed-off-shotgun called the Fusil. The "Commando" could only be used for killing [targeting] humans. I am not surprised that Nemrod had a public problem. However, the model name of your tool is scribed on the handle; disregard the distributor's post manufacture added stickers for sale. They had a sales problem. I cannot believe I am in a conversation correcting Nemrod's false promulgations. Nemrod eliminated their about 12 inch model they sold as "Commando" and called their next lengthy model, "Fusil", "Commando". Gee, are they still in business? Yes! They make weapons under a different name. Real commandos do not kill fish. Guess what they are trained to kill. Now, sell your tool.

You are enjoying Australia; you are so lucky, my friend. You probably do not have the resources available to us immediately; you do have the internet. If you are unable to purchase from Ace Hardware or its supplier from the internet, I will send you the faucet washers. Incidentally, the precision washers of which I speak were not available ten years ago. Go figure!

Let me know how radiation is affecting our friends in the great Australia.

tensor
 
popgun pete

popgun pete

Well-Known Member
Jul 30, 2008
4,538
1,290
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The gun you are referring to is the "Mini-Clipper", it came with a holster that strapped to your leg. The holster also had a sheath built into it for a dive knife. The "Comando" that we are talking about here is a mid-handle gun, there was never a version that strapped to the leg.
 

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  • Nemrod Comando pneumatic.JPG
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okieman1

New Member
Aug 6, 2009
10
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This past winter I was able to find some seals for both my comando and clipper guns. Wow what luck, anyway they're functional again and holding air. The faucet seals mentioned in an early post, yes please provide part number I'm always in the market and willing to try new ideas and seals on these old guns.
The fellow I found used to be a Nemrod distributor and still had some parts, I bought all the seals he had and was able to make repairs to several guns. Believe it or not but I have a friend that has a brand new in box Comando gun still stored away, I begged him to sell it to me with no luck.

Thanks
 
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tensor

New Member
Apr 17, 2011
7
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popgun pete,

The Nemrod spear gun that you have pictured appears to be identical to mine which was purchased for $65 in 1967 in the Florida Keys. The unit measures 60.3cm from rubber tip to plastic cap, or 23 3/4 inches. In 1967 it was marketed as the Nemrod "Fusil". It is marked as Nemrod "Fusil" on the handle. The 30cm "Commando" was also available at that time. [My spell checker still places two "m's" in commando]. Actually, it is this forum's spell checker. For some reason [usually a legal one] Nemrod dropped the 30cm model and subsequently placed a misspelled "Comando" decal on the "Fusil" model. If you can read your handle, please tell me if it says "Comando" or "Fusil". I am so curious, as people have stated that the misspelled after manufacture decal falls off the tool.

Being in Ausrtralia, you should be able to get metric faucet rubber washers at your larger hardware stores. The dimensions are 6mm id, 12mm od, and thickness as per your piston [which is identical to your hand pump]. If these seals work in your hand pump, they will work as piston seals. They are equivalent. Not too tight, but tight enough to hold 100 psi. If you can't get them, I'll send you a bunch.

tensor
 
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tensor

New Member
Apr 17, 2011
7
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okieman1,

I'll get you the Ace Hardware rubber faucet washer item numbers tomorrow, as the store is closed.

Incidentally, the reason there is a hand pump and a centered handle is so one can load the darn thing under water. If you can no longer pump the air, then that is the limit of your strength to load a spear under water. Clever? I've been there.

tensor
 
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okieman1

New Member
Aug 6, 2009
10
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Thanks, and I await the part numbers. I've used these guns since 1968 and acutually have all of them operational at the moment. However I never pass up an opportunity to purchase parts for them. It will be great if these seals work out if so I'll be buying a hand full for future use.

Thanks
 
popgun pete

popgun pete

Well-Known Member
Jul 30, 2008
4,538
1,290
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My gun has "Fusil Oleoneumatico" on the RHS of the black plastic handle and directly below that it says "Pat. Spain, USA and Other Countries". That is simply stating that it is an "oleo-pneumatic gun"; "Fusil" is Spanish for gun, so "Fusil" is not the model name of the gun. On the LHS it says "Nemrod" and "Made in Spain". All the "Silver" series guns have this same black plastic handle, the words moulded into the handle are therefore exactly the same on all of them, I know that for sure as a friend at the time had the "Corsario" which was the second longest model with the power selector knob at the rear end. Other models were the "Bucanero" which was the next size up from the "Comando", the longest model being the "Filibustero" with a power selector knob the same as the one on the "Corsario". At just over 60 cm my gun is the same length as your gun, so your gun is also a "Comando". I have never heard of a smaller "Silver" series gun, it certainly is not mentioned in the adverts or the service manual for the guns.

Thanks for the offer of the seals, but I was mainly curious as to how they fitted in the tubular aluminum cups of the piston which are designed to press the original cylindrical seals with ribbed cone outer ends onto the spine of the piston in order to prevent leaks through the centre of the piston. The original seals were compressed slightly and trapped in place on the metal spine by the two circlips seen in my photo which firmly located the smaller aluminium caps at the centre of each seal's outward face. I now have two spare pistons, the first had deteriorated in drawer storage, but the second and more recent one seems OK having been greased and wrapped up by the original owner. Although good in its day, I found the "Sten" and "Miniministen" much better guns for the conditions that I dived in and so soon put the "Comando" in storage. Many years later I tried the gun again and found it seemed very sluggish to shoot, so I dismantled it to find that the piston seals had gone even though the gun still held air pressure, the by then completely reverted rear piston seal acted like a brake instead of sliding freely in the inner barrel. I only bought the replacement pistons as and when I happened to come across them, they probably would have been thrown out otherwise. A lot of old gun spare parts were junked by subsequent owners of old dive shops who had no idea which guns they belonged to, often finding them unlabelled in the "odds and ends" box at the rear of the store. One owner said that he wanted to sell new guns, not keep ancient one's going, so he put all his miscellaneous gun parts in the trash bin.
 

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tensor

New Member
Apr 17, 2011
7
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okirman1,

I am sorry for my delay, as it has been several years since I re-engineered the seals or rings in my fusil by Nemrod; the series all incorporate the same fittings, as per this post.
l also had to care for my dog, my best friend, and shallow diving buddy.

The Ace Hardware numbers are:

4072237
STK NO 35245B
000L FLAT FAUCET WASHER
29/64 inch od
12/64 inch id
12mm

DANCO INC.
IRVING, TX 75062
MADE IN TAIWAN

That is the closest fitting I could find in the U.S. that works. Do not even try the 000 Flat Faucet Washer as it is too large. You can easily test the seal/ring with a 6mm drill bit and the rubber washer mounted on said bit in the open end of the hand pump [use appropriate oil, such as vacuum pump oil]. I have tested the seal to 300 psi. No air bubbles under water.

Keep in mind that even though the id of the washer is 3/8 inch, when inserted on a 6mm shaft the thing changes dimensions, such that the od is slightly greater than 12mm. I got my mother a snook four days ago with the re-engineered tool of four years ago.

FYI

tensor
 
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