Monday, September 28, 2020
  • Welcome to the DeeperBlue.com Forums, the largest online community dedicated to Freediving, Scuba Diving and Spearfishing. To gain full access to the DeeperBlue.com Forums you must register for a free account. As a registered member you will be able to:

    • Join over 43,000+ fellow diving enthusiasts from around the world on this forum
    • Participate in and browse from over 510,000+ posts.
    • Communicate privately with other divers from around the world.
    • Post your own photos or view from 7,450+ user submitted images.
    • All this and much more...

    You can gain access to all this absolutely free when you register for an account, so sign up today!

SEEKING factual statistics on % of normal population who can hold breath for longer than 2 & 3 mins

Daniel Trotter

New Member
May 16, 2018
3
0
1
42
Sydney, Australia
foundatsea.co
Hi GURU's, Dive Scientists and Dive Doctors,

This is my 1st post, so please excuse me if this has been answered elsewhere, I have searched the forums but couldn't find the answers I am looking for.

I am SEEKING factual statistics on % of the normal population who woul be capable of breath hold longer than 2 & 3 mins (respectively) after a day of professional training.

We are researching statistics for a film we are producing about fear.

If anyone has any insight on where these stats may be available, we'd really appreciate it.

Has the data from AIDA or APNEA training been collated anywhere?

Cheers

Dan
 
Mar 20, 2011
704
150
83
Los Angeles
Many of my beginning students have some dive experience (ie recreational spearfishing) so they might count as 'normal population' but the majority of students with zero dive background hold their breath for more than two minutes and a lot of them can do more than 3, all in the first day.

Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk
 
  • Like
Reactions: SubSub
OP
OP
Daniel Trotter

Daniel Trotter

New Member
May 16, 2018
3
0
1
42
Sydney, Australia
foundatsea.co
Many of my beginning students have some dive experience (ie recreational spearfishing) so they might count as 'normal population' but the majority of students with zero dive background hold their breath for more than two minutes and a lot of them can do more than 3, all in the first day.

Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk
Thanks for your insight, I've spoken to a number of Free Dive Instructors in Australia,, and the same answer comes back;

Physically almost 100% of the normal healthy population will be able to achieve a 2 minute breath-hold after a day of training. Reality is that 90 - 95% can and do, with the other 5 - 10% blocked by mental restrictions.

At 3 minutes this falls back to somewhere between 80-90% of the normal population can physically achieve - but the reality is 60% can only mentally achieve this.

Guess what I am hoping for is some hard facts or research to back up these statements. We need to be able to publish referenced fiugures.

Keen to share the finished film once it is complete,

Cheers
 
Mar 20, 2011
704
150
83
Los Angeles
That sounds about right but while I agree that maybe only 60% can mentally achieve 3 mins, I think physically that number among healthy adults is above 90%, with the physical limit being BO or samba.

Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk
 

Lauri_A

Well-Known Member
Jan 2, 2014
30
7
48
39
Helsinki, Finland
Not statistics as such but this is a seminar slide from Erika Schagatay's seminar where she had done estimates on breathhold capabilities of untrained vs trained divers.

Normal average person was calculated to be at max 3:30 static before BO.
 

Attachments

Lauri_A

Well-Known Member
Jan 2, 2014
30
7
48
39
Helsinki, Finland
I’d say 11,5min before BO is pretty much even for the experienced diver.
That's maybe a bit misleading headline - it was more about calculating the limit of what is possible within human limitations, it's surprisingly close to actual WR.

It shows quite nicely how it's built up - you need to pack 2x as much air into lungs (10-12l), have higher hemoglobin and blood volume (higher O2 content), adapt the spleen (more RBC storage), lower your O2 consumption (stronger dive reflex) and have better hypoxia tolerance (BO at 30% SAO2 vs 50% for untrained)
 

SubSub

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2015
489
185
58
43
Stockholm
Yes it is possible, but considering there is only 2 people on the planet that have made it past 11 min I'd say it takes hell of a lot more than the average "trained diver" to go there! I'd say even half that takes more than the average "trained diver". :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: J Campbell

MarcinB

Well-Known Member
Oct 26, 2012
259
63
68
Bialystok/Poland
I've tested 91 medicine students (19-20 years old, both males and females). They did dry breathold in a sitting position, no warm up or hyperventilation, moderate inhale. They had no experience in diving or breath holding. Most of them were quite stressed, so the conditions were pretty hard. You can see the results below.
 

Attachments

SubSub

Well-Known Member
Aug 26, 2015
489
185
58
43
Stockholm
I've tested 91 medicine students (19-20 years old, both males and females). They did dry breathold in a sitting position, no warm up or hyperventilation, moderate inhale. They had no experience in diving or breath holding. Most of them were quite stressed, so the conditions were pretty hard. You can see the results below.
Those results looks like what I would expect, the average looks to be about 60-100secs. But that's the average joe.

I just don't think it's linear when you continue up the scale. I don't think the average "trained diver", or even the average "world class expert diver" could hold 11.5min before BO. No way. There are a few that are up there, but they are extremes.
 
DeeperBlue.com - The Worlds Largest Community Dedicated To Freediving, Scuba Diving and Spearfishing

ABOUT US

ISSN 1469-865X | Copyright © 1996 - 2020 deeperblue.net limited.

DeeperBlue.com is the World's Largest Community dedicated to Freediving, Scuba Diving, Spearfishing and Diving Travel.

We've been dedicated to bringing you the freshest news, features and discussions from around the underwater world since 1996.

ADVERT