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sequence for wishbones

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
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Bill

Baron of Breathold
Oct 17, 2001
1,805
332
188
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If you can handle one more, I have a dumb question. On a 150 cm 'Addict' gun (trigger 35 cm from the back) am I supposed to load the front rubber first or last? Why?
Aloha
Bill
 

icarus pacific

Human-in-training
Nov 7, 2001
2,880
212
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the messiah asking the masses...

You're asking me?? ;)

I had a discussion about this the other day, (really!) and my take on it has always been to load the rearmost band to the rearmost notch, tab whathaveyou, first and the front band to the front tab... last. It keeps the jumble of rubber clear of that tab that always seems to be just a bit more of a bear. What I've taken to doing the last few dozen years is to make the bands length to accomodate their positions on the gun, theoretically making all things equal. That said, I've got a real hard time believing that it's making a difference anyways...

You going to go back to packing a gun and showing 'em all how to do it? :martial


sven
 
Last edited:

andrsn

Just visiting...
Aug 26, 2001
1,213
75
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Bill,

I think it depends on the number of bands. On a big wood gun, I'll load the closest band first to the first notch and finish at the rear notch. I find it difficult to work the wishbone down onto a tab if other bands are bunched up around the tab you're trying to get to. This is definitely the case if you have 4 or more bands.

On a double banded euro config, I'll load the farthest band over the closer band to the last notch/tab in the shaft and then grab the closest band and pull it up under the cocked band. This helps keep the gun from getting away from you and also helps seat the wishbone.

Cheers,
Anderson
 

icarus pacific

Human-in-training
Nov 7, 2001
2,880
212
0
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More than 4 bands?! Whatya doing, impersonating IYA? :D

I should have made mention that doing the rear band/rear tab thing is easiest when using metal 'bones, but also let's you grunt the longest stretch on the initial band and after that they get progressively easier. An important technique to get used to is grabbing the ends of the band and giving them a little twist with your wrists as you pull- this'll help keep the wishbone line against the shaft allowing it to dive behind the tab and letting you release the death grip a bit easier. :crutch Otherwise, yes, Andy's method of pulling the bands successively over or around eachother will work, but that last band is a mutha you wish you got done with first...(see 4- 3/4 x 26" bands...)

I'm not a big fan of rest tabs, but I can see their worth, especially if you use it to choke the bands for those close-in shots.


sven
 

Iyadiver

Mr. Long Post
Apr 22, 2002
998
72
0
I load the easy way. Closest band to closest tab, so the most forward tab get the most backward rubber. Yep the pull maybe 5-10% unequal but it doesn't seems to mess with accuracy. This way I save at least 30 seconds when loading 4 bands. With 5/8 bands this is how I do it, save me energy. With 9/16 is easy easy to choose at will what goes where.
 

SpearSlinger1

New Member
Dec 20, 2002
147
18
0
58
With three bands and a shaft with two rear tabs and a helper tab I load the rear band to the rear tab. The second band to the foreward tab and the third band to the rear tab. The helper tab I use with the rear band for shooting under rocks and coral heads. At times I only need two bands. Then I load the rear band to the rear tab and the second band to the foreward tab with the third band on the helper tab just to keep it from flapping around. I don't think it matters to the fish which band is on which tab.:)
 

Bill

Baron of Breathold
Oct 17, 2001
1,805
332
188
82
Thanks

Good to hear the ideas bounce around. Feel like I'm behind the curve with the soft wishbones and tabs on the shaft and all. Eyeballs, arteries and the fourth wishbone are the only things that get harder as you get older. I was taught to cut the rubbers different lengths and I just developed a technique of pulling with three fingers and steering with the pinkies. I put #4 sling in the short slot, repositioned the gun and moved the wishbone to the back. Same technique for #3. 2 and 1 have a lot shorter pull and became easy after I solved the guiding problem.
I shall try to reduce the Ono population slightly.
Thanks again for the help
Bill
 

icarus pacific

Human-in-training
Nov 7, 2001
2,880
212
0
62
this has quotes written all over it

That fourth bone keeps getting harder, we'll be asking you for the hints! rofl

The line 'bones were something that I distrusted as well, Bill. I had metal bones snap occasionally and didn't see a Dacron or nylon string lasting for any length (!) of time. The big thing is to ease the notches of the shaft with a fine file to make the corners smooth and increase the life of the line, as well as really getting after the whipping that secures the band to the bone.

I gotta go take a cold shower now...


sven
 
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