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Tom Sietas – Changing the Norm?

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donmoore

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Besides the no warm-up approach of Tom Sietas, there are some other things he does in statics that are rather unorthodox, at least to current thought. The fact that he is slashing previous records though, is enough to make me rethink a few things!

I have only been able to see his demonstration static on the 2004 Worlds DVD and the clip of his 8:56 in the Rhein-Main Cup in Germany http://www.glennvenghaus.com/freedi....php?Location=2 , but one thing I noticed is he likes to hang on to the side of the pool. At the PFD clinic they taught letting the arms and shoulders go relax and falling down by the sides. This is also how it seems almost everyone else does their statics. At the 2004 Worlds Tom had both hands and arms on the poolside. At the Rhein-Main Cup he had one hand. Am I seeing this correct? Did he do this the whole statics?

One thing I dislike, especially when the spotter wants to stay out of the water, is how they don’t hold me straight and the proper distance for easily grabbing the poolside. It’s a big mental task, after being in the trans for a minutes, to have to figure out where I am in the pool and how, with the least effort possible, come to an upright position facing the pool edge. Its also an unwanted distraction to feel myself drifting away from what I think is the proper position, during the static. If holding on to the poolside the whole static doesn’t burn more O2 and hurt the time, than I think I will try it.

I did a simple test with spirometer. I compared how much air I could get in my lungs in the normal final breath position of arms down to having my arms above my head as if hanging on to the pool. Not that I want to take my last breath with my arms above my head, but I figured if the position restricted my lung capacity, than the position would create more pressure and thus increase hr and O2 consumption in a static. In the first few attempts my lung size was less, but by the third attempt I apparently became used to the position and the lung capacity was just as much.

What do you think?
don
 

smellsfishy

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Don,

I've done statics with my arm up on the side of the pool. (My buddy was out of the pool) I found it more difficult to relax certain muscles. At the same time my PB was done this way. I honestly don't think the arm position is a big factor though.
 
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O'Boy

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All my competition statics were done in the position with arms on the pool side (since I do Statics without suit). I like it that way and I was always able to performe good static (compared to my Dry PB done in sitting position).
 

naiad

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Originally posted by donmoore
One thing I dislike, especially when the spotter wants to stay out of the water, is how they don’t hold me straight and the proper distance for easily grabbing the poolside. It’s a big mental task, after being in the trans for a minutes, to have to figure out where I am in the pool and how, with the least effort possible, come to an upright position facing the pool edge. Its also an unwanted distraction to feel myself drifting away from what I think is the proper position, during the static.
I always hold onto the side of the pool when I do statics, for the reasons that Don mentions. I always come up by holding onto the side of the pool, but none of the people I train with does this. The main reason is that I find it very difficult to stand up without falling over, because it is difficult to grip the slippery tiles. I always give up early, sometimes even less than a minute, if I try not to hold onto anything, because all I can think about is how to get to the surface.

This makes me more determined to stick to my way.

I'm glad to know that it's possible to do a good time with this method! ;)

Lucia
 

laminar

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Hi,

I was the spotter for Tom Sietas' 9'24" in Vancouver. He only grabbed the pool edge at the end of the static, maybe with a minute or minute and a half left.

Holding on to the pool edge for the whole static is an incredible waste of energy (for me). Although Tom does eventually hold the edge of the pool, what you don't see unless you are close up to him (within arms length) is just how incredibly limp and relaxed he is as soon as he starts the breath hold (arms by his sides). That I believe is part of the formula for his success. The other part is his training and the incredible hypoxic tolerance and I think a really, really slow drop in Oxygen saturation over the length of his breath hold.

We are not talking about a simple trick, it's deeper than that.

Many static apnea practitioners grad the pool edge near the end of the static so as to have a stable recovery.

Pete Scott
Vancouver, BC
 

Kars

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indeed Pete, by resting the arms on the edge one can lift the head only to recover.
It's better to wait with it until the last 30 sec. When the hands lay, on should take care one does not get tension in the shoulders, chest, back etc, a common mistake!
Focus repeat the comming up proceture one more time in your head before comming up, ensuring you do it right :)

Have a nice training,

Carlos
 

Freediver81

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Erez Beatus, the former World Record holder in Unassisted freediving, did 7'50 dry static 3 days ago!

Well done Erez! I'm sure he could have done more in wet static!

Tom watch out!
 

naiad

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I usually rest my hand on the ladder in the corner of the pool. This doesn't use any extra O2 because only the weight of my hand is keeping it there.

Does anyone else do this?

Lucia
 

xsaul

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Fear not, Lucia! I hold myself down on the ladder. WaterRat is your company. Are there any other takers? Of late, since that lying-on-back-in-the-hot tub wet 7 last December 13, I've felt too weird about static to do much with it. OH--I do it. Just not very well. It's a head trip, I know. ALL MY FRIENDS AND FAMILY ARE TERRIFIED OF THIS. The Fear-Vibes have poisoned it for me.
And then I go and start this by saying, "Fear not, Lucia!" I don't want anyone else's stuff ruined by people's fears. It will take time to recover. I have not given myself mental permission since December 13 to do a long one. I FEEL AS IF I AM DISSING THOSE I LOVE. They don't want me to drown--for good reason. I HAVE NO BUDDY. :(
WaterRat
[email protected]
 
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