Guest viewing is limited
  • Welcome to the DeeperBlue.com Forums, the largest online community dedicated to Freediving, Scuba Diving and Spearfishing. To gain full access to the DeeperBlue.com Forums you must register for a free account. As a registered member you will be able to:

    • Join over 44,280+ fellow diving enthusiasts from around the world on this forum
    • Participate in and browse from over 516,210+ posts.
    • Communicate privately with other divers from around the world.
    • Post your own photos or view from 7,441+ user submitted images.
    • All this and much more...

    You can gain access to all this absolutely free when you register for an account, so sign up today!

  • PLEASE NOTE: There will be forum downtime today (Thursday 13th May 2021) as we migrate to a new server and do some housekeeping!

Two mainstreams in dynamic apnea

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
It can take a long time to get an up-to-date response or contact with relevant users.

Vlado

New Member
Apr 19, 2004
56
8
0
Thought came to my mind about the current trends in dynamic apnea. I think there are two mainstreams in dynamic apnea forming up at this moment.

First are led with amazing athlets like Stig and Peter Pederson. Their technique is perfect and magical to watch, they are physically very prepared, very aquatic. That all results in their very fast and efficient movement underwater.

In the second group I would put athlets like Tom Sietas and Ant Williams, who use deep concentration and inner strength to let their bodies glide through the water. They are moving at half the speed and taking twice as much time, yet they are achieveing same or even better results. They are too amazing athlets in any way, only the approach is very different.

Of course the question to ask is which approach is ultimately better? Surely there is no definite answer (as for lot of other things considering apnea, which is great!). I feel like we are discovering new criteria for the sport every day, with competitors accepting the one that appeals them the most, defining the very sport in the process. It is exciting!


Personally my approach to dynamic is the first one. I have trouble relaxing enough, specially at competitions so it comes natural for me to utilise my faster heart rate to go more powerful and faster. But I have to say that the second approach feels more 'apneish' and maybe what Tom showed the world couple of days ago is only the beginning of new era of dynamic apnea?


Vlad


"Today is a good day to dive"
 

Pezman

We pee deep. Ew!
Sep 24, 2002
591
72
118
A timed dynamic might be an interesting discipline (e.g. who can do 100M in the least amount of time). If folks raced in pairs, it might even be a really exciting spectator event. You can imagine someone way in the lead and then BO-ing because they pushed too hard.
 

Jorg

Sharkbait
Nov 15, 2001
793
96
133
100 mtr timed... it's called finswimming and it was an official finswimming discipline around 1978-80, if I remember correctly. Nowadays the longest apnea finswimming discipline is 50 meters. I think the world record is something like 14:55 seconds... :hmm
 

Vlado

New Member
Apr 19, 2004
56
8
0
Ah, the man with the funny hat himself :)

Hey Peter I am wondering when did you receive your first contraction when you were going for the 200m? Also what does your pre-dive preparation looks like?

Thanks
Vladimir
 

Peter P

New Member
Sep 4, 2003
90
16
0
48
Hi Vladimir,

My first contraction is normally about 85-90m, but in some cases on 100m.

Prediveroutine is: 30 min of streaching lungs and muscles. 1 x 50m and 1 x 80m. 5 min rest and go...

Peter P
 

Vlado

New Member
Apr 19, 2004
56
8
0
Yes that matches my assumptions. My PB is 100m and my first contraction is between 40-45m. So it is proportional. I guess roughly the same rule goes for staic apnea too. You achieve little better then the double of your first contraction (surely there are exceptions). I wonder what is the precise type of training that prolongs the time of getting the first contraction?

Anyways Peter, when do Stig and you plan to try some new record(s)?

Vlad
 

quasimoto

New Member
Oct 27, 2004
133
7
0
32
vlad

co2 tolerance apnea tables will increase the time before you get your first contraction. Do a search here and i'm sure that you will come up with a lot of information:)

rory
 

efattah

Well-Known Member
Mar 2, 2001
3,294
487
173
The world finswimming record for 100m immersion (underwater) is something like 30.8 seconds by Irchenko (sp?)
 

Walrus

Oz freediver
Oct 3, 2001
693
77
0
Yes that matches my assumptions. My PB is 100m and my first contraction is between 40-45m. So it is proportional. I guess roughly the same rule goes for staic apnea too. You achieve little better then the double of your first contraction (surely there are exceptions). I wonder what is the precise type of training that prolongs the time of getting the first contraction?

Vlad

I actually wouldn't pay any attention to when you get contractions relative to someone else. For example a few years back someone I trained with would get contractions on a dynamic at about 50m and me at 60m. So he guessed he should do a similar distance to me, - 20m.....
So I would do 125m+ and he would blackout trying to do 75m :duh
Other friend I trained with would barely take a few deep breaths on a static, and wouldn't get contractions until 5 or 6 minutes. Me I would do 10-15 big purge breaths and still get contractions at 2 minutes on a first static, and maybe 3.30 on a final. So he would hold for maybe 5-8 contractions, me about 60-100 :waterwork
Everyone has a different response to CO2, and when they get contractions. I think it's mostly genetic, it changes somewhat with training, but for me and most people I know it's only temporary. Some top level divers I know actually get contractions earlier now then they used to, but are doing longer statics.

Cheers,
Wal
 

Vlado

New Member
Apr 19, 2004
56
8
0
Hey Tobias,

I hope Peter P wouldn't mind - there is a full set of articles posted by the man himself about training for dynamic apnea including the training programm with monofin and all that spiced up with videos. You can find it at

http://www.apneamania.com/code/training_sel.asp?catID=6&tipID=7

Cheers

ps. that's a respectable results for such a young freediver! Don't forget, NEVER dive alone!


Vlad
 

commonerg

Half Man, Half Chlorine
Jun 3, 2004
168
27
0
36
Vlado said:
Of course the question to ask is which approach is ultimately better?

I believe, and I hope some of the more experienced divers on deeper blue would agree, this (and most aspects of freediving) is more a matter of finding a balance that works best for your body and experience. If your swimming technique exceeds your relaxation technique, perhaps it is best to move a little faster in water, and vise versa.

My (DNF) Dynamic Without Fin PB is currently 120m and I rely heavily on my competitive swimming background and technique rather than on deep concentration. I find that I can relax almost as well with 3 strong cycles across the pool as I can with 5 or 6 light cycles (not a tron reference).

I have noticed from watching the various Stig videos that, even at his level, he varies his technique (no fin) quite a bit sometimes incorporating a slight full body butterfly kick with his pull.

Peter, do you have any dynamic videos online? I have been a regular visitor to your website, and I love the dynamic training videos, but are there perhaps and full length dynamic videos I have overlooked?
 
  • Like
Reactions: derelictp

commonerg

Half Man, Half Chlorine
Jun 3, 2004
168
27
0
36
Great video!

Very smooth finning technique from head to toe. Sure you aren't part dolphin?

It's hard to tell because of the camera changes, but it looks like you spent around 2:03 in Apnea during the 200 meters. Almost exactly the same as Stig's 200m during the 204m attempt. Overall a quick pace, it seems you started out a bit slower and picked it up a bit on the last lap.

Thanks for the video! This will be a nice addition to my dynamic technique library.
 
DeeperBlue.com - The Worlds Largest Community Dedicated To Freediving, Scuba Diving and Spearfishing

ABOUT US

ISSN 1469-865X | Copyright © 1996 - 2021 deeperblue.net limited.

DeeperBlue.com is the World's Largest Community dedicated to Freediving, Scuba Diving, Spearfishing and Diving Travel.

We've been dedicated to bringing you the freshest news, features and discussions from around the underwater world since 1996.

ADVERT