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Wonka table progression

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
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H

hansa123

Member
Feb 26, 2021
26
1
13
28
Hi there,
when doing O2 tables, I usually go up to 4:00, which is not easy but doable. For CO2 I train with Wonka tables, so that I count the time with contractions. Between repetitions, I do 2 inhales (hold, then exhale, inhale, exhale, inhale and then hold again). Today I did a pyramid scheme so starting with 10 seconds under contractions, going up to 50 and then repeating 50 eight times, and then going back down to 10 again. Total time under contractions therefore 10 minutes. For progressing the table, what do you think is better: more repetitions (say, 10 instead of 8 with the longest time) or longer holds, so 55 or 60 instead of 50?
 
J Campbell

J Campbell

Well-Known Member
Sep 17, 2001
615
192
148
67
Instead of counting contractions, pick a breath hold time that fits you - say 1 minute. Then hold for one minute, exhale, inhale, hold another minute, exhale, inhale, hold another minute... keep doing this for
for 8 or 10 cycles. If you can't finish, then next time cut back the time, if it's too easy then add time.
 
Nathan Vinski

Nathan Vinski

Well-Known Member
Apr 19, 2015
283
182
83
26
Hi there,
when doing O2 tables, I usually go up to 4:00, which is not easy but doable. For CO2 I train with Wonka tables, so that I count the time with contractions. Between repetitions, I do 2 inhales (hold, then exhale, inhale, exhale, inhale and then hold again). Today I did a pyramid scheme so starting with 10 seconds under contractions, going up to 50 and then repeating 50 eight times, and then going back down to 10 again. Total time under contractions therefore 10 minutes. For progressing the table, what do you think is better: more repetitions (say, 10 instead of 8 with the longest time) or longer holds, so 55 or 60 instead of 50?
My honest opinion,

10 minutes of contractions, is 10 to many mins of contractions for CO2 training.

(Yes I'm suggesting no contractions for CO2 tables)

The reasoning: the point (at least what I think it should be) of CO2 training is to delay your contractions. This happens by raising CO2 to the point just before a contraction, and then maintaing the level of CO2 as close to this as possible for the duration of the table.

As you adapt,your first contraction point gets later and later.

The results:

I uses to get early contractions in every single discipline after 6 years of training.

After 2 years of doing no contractions CO2 training I've done 90m CWT without contractions, and 110m DYN without any urge to breathe.

My girlfriend has only trained this way, and does 150m DYN without any urge to breathe (to hypoxic limit)

I'm coaching (online) and athlete right now who also just did his first 100m DYNb without contractions.

I have other cases too..

So, the NO CONTRACTIONS CO2 training delays the urge to breathe & dissociates Contractions from the urge to breathe (so even if you feel the CO2, it takes longer for the contraction / tension to start.

This was actually the first video I made for my training channel..

 
H

hansa123

Member
Feb 26, 2021
26
1
13
28
Thanks a lot for your replies. As a beginner, I am just trying to make sense of the huge amount of (partially conflicting) advice and training methods and decided to start at some point So yeah, I will absolutely check out this quite different training strategy as well, thanks a lot.
 
2

2b3

Active Member
Sep 11, 2013
5
1
38
My honest opinion,

10 minutes of contractions, is 10 to many mins of contractions for CO2 training.

(Yes I'm suggesting no contractions for CO2 tables)

The reasoning: the point (at least what I think it should be) of CO2 training is to delay your contractions. This happens by raising CO2 to the point just before a contraction, and then maintaing the level of CO2 as close to this as possible for the duration of the table.

As you adapt,your first contraction point gets later and later.

The results:

I uses to get early contractions in every single discipline after 6 years of training.

After 2 years of doing no contractions CO2 training I've done 90m CWT without contractions, and 110m DYN without any urge to breathe.

My girlfriend has only trained this way, and does 150m DYN without any urge to breathe (to hypoxic limit)

I'm coaching (online) and athlete right now who also just did his first 100m DYNb without contractions.

I have other cases too..

So, the NO CONTRACTIONS CO2 training delays the urge to breathe & dissociates Contractions from the urge to breathe (so even if you feel the CO2, it takes longer for the contraction / tension to start.

This was actually the first video I made for my training channel..


Thanks for the kind and very informative share. I was approaching CO2 tolerance using Buteyko training app and exercises which recommends a v gentle approach. I find that it is a slow progression but with multiple other associated benefits: more relaxed, better focus... I will definitely try doing cO2 tables without contractions and c how i get on ....
 
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