• Welcome to the DeeperBlue.com Forums, the largest online community dedicated to Freediving, Scuba Diving and Spearfishing. To gain full access to the DeeperBlue.com Forums you must register for a free account. As a registered member you will be able to:

    • Join over 44,280+ fellow diving enthusiasts from around the world on this forum
    • Participate in and browse from over 516,210+ posts.
    • Communicate privately with other divers from around the world.
    • Post your own photos or view from 7,441+ user submitted images.
    • All this and much more...

    You can gain access to all this absolutely free when you register for an account, so sign up today!

Wood gun Recommendations

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
It can take a long time to get an up-to-date response or contact with relevant users.
Andrew the fish

Andrew the fish

Well-Known Member
Oct 17, 2010
544
145
83
I'm not too informed on these matters but I have heard people say it is because of the "vacuum" I find it hard to believe because in most cases the shaft is already smaller than the ET and has room for water to fill the track. Same goes for the friction, it's really only touching the bottom of the track exactly how an open track would be, but maybe if you had a tighter ET it could be a problem.
Of course the water get get in, but how fast? Try imagining the water as thick as molasses, this is perhaps a better mental picture. At fast velocities everything has its effect, track, channel, wishbone, shooting line and whether bands have taper or not. It is hard to argue since we do not operate with real numbers from pool tests to demonstrate the difference.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mr. X
Tbo

Tbo

Member
Nov 23, 2017
33
7
23
20
Of course the water get get in, but how fast? Try imagining the water as thick as molasses, this is perhaps a better mental picture. At fast velocities everything has its effect, track, channel, wishbone, shooting line and whether bands have taper or not. It is hard to argue since we do not operate with real numbers from pool tests to demonstrate the difference.
Right but what I'm saying is I think the difference is minimal because a deep open track would just have the same issues compared to a loose enclosed track.
 
Mr. X

Mr. X

Forum Mentor
Staff member
Forum Mentor
Jul 14, 2005
8,230
1,680
418
Of course the water get get in, but how fast? Try imagining the water as thick as molasses, this is perhaps a better mental picture. At fast velocities everything has its effect, track, channel, wishbone, shooting line and whether bands have taper or not. It is hard to argue since we do not operate with real numbers from pool tests to demonstrate the difference.
Good points. I think sharkfins must also slow down a spear - and I would think all ET spearguns require sharkfinned spears.

Sharkfins probably hit the fish harder though and cause more damage. The jury is still out on whether they are really stronger than notched spears (see discussion of Cressi spears breaking at the sharkfin welds :( ).
 
Diving Gecko

Diving Gecko

shooter & shooter
Jun 24, 2008
1,698
458
188
Good points. I think sharkfins must also slow down a spear - and I would think all ET spearguns require sharkfinned spears.

Sharkfins probably hit the fish harder though and cause more damage. The jury is still out on whether they are really stronger than notched spears (see discussion of Cressi spears breaking at the sharkfin welds :( ).

If they break at the sharkfins it’s likely because the weld itself changed the temper/hardening of the shaft. I am fairly sure that’s why Salvi has experimented with what I assume is a less intrusive weld method on their new Capture shafts where they use robotic laser welding. The bead is much smaller but seems perfectly placed.
I’ve only had one of these shafts and it’s not a big data set but still, I’m recommending it widely, haha.
The sharkfins on those shafts are also as small as they can be (3mm tall) and they are finished well, too. It’s the only shaft I’ve had that didn’t need deburring.

Now, 3mm may not be tall enough for enclosed tracks but then again, I don’t need ETs and trust the experience and tests done by Majd showing their performance loss.
Look for his Pathos Sniper test on his SpearQ8 YouTube channel where he ends up grinding the ET off of a brand new gun:)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Bill McIntyre

Bill McIntyre

San Clemente, CA
Staff member
Forum Mentor
Jan 27, 2005
3,490
1,227
368
83
I don’t understand mention of shafts breaking at shark fins. I’ve never experienced it or heard of it. What forces could be exerted on the shaft at a shark fin? My shafts have the line attached to a hole in the front fin or in a mini loading fin. Are you perhaps talking about shafts with the line attachment in the rear end?
 
Mr. X

Mr. X

Forum Mentor
Staff member
Forum Mentor
Jul 14, 2005
8,230
1,680
418
Possibly. Recent posts from a forum member in north America. Possibly California or possibly Canada I forget. Had 2 Cressi spears break, at fin. I think he was using a Cressi Geronimo. Included images showing the break. And he had to buy the second spear ,and presumably a third one: no warranty replacement!
 
Bill McIntyre

Bill McIntyre

San Clemente, CA
Staff member
Forum Mentor
Jan 27, 2005
3,490
1,227
368
83
Possibly. Recent posts from a forum member in north America. Possibly California or possibly Canada I forget. Had 2 Cressi spears break, at fin. I think he was using a Cressi Geronimo. Included images showing the break. And he had to buy the second spear ,and presumably a third one: no warranty replacement!
If it was a Cressi then I guess the line hole was at the rear end. I’ve never used a gun like that. All mine have had the line attached at a fin.
 
DeeperBlue.com - The Worlds Largest Community Dedicated To Freediving, Scuba Diving and Spearfishing

ABOUT US

ISSN 1469-865X | Copyright © 1996 - 2022 deeperblue.net limited.

DeeperBlue.com is the World's Largest Community dedicated to Freediving, Scuba Diving, Spearfishing and Diving Travel.

We've been dedicated to bringing you the freshest news, features and discussions from around the underwater world since 1996.

ADVERT