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50M dive profile, please!

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
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bevan dewar

Well-Known Member
Sep 26, 2001
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was wondering, for a typical 50m dive, what would be a typical dive time? of that, how long would/ should be spent on decent versus ascent? lastly, what depth should one be negitive at and what depth would one give ones last kick and begin to glide? an answer from someone in the know would be verry much appreciated. thanks
bevan
 

Tom Lightfoot

Well-Known Member
Aug 21, 2001
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I think for most people the descent and ascent rate is about 1m/s. I know that I descend a bit slower than 1m/s and ascend a bit faster than 1m/s. Eric Fattah has posted graphs of his deeper dives to the freedivecanada list and from what I remember, he descends faster but ascends slower. Either way, there's not a lot of difference in speed and it is usually constant through both descent and ascent.

If you're doing 50m you should weight yourself to be neutral in the 10m to 15m depth range. I usually cut engines at the 20 to 25m depth range and sink the rest of the way. I like the free ride so I stop kicking pretty early. I also keep my hand on my nose all the way down so my descent is relatively slow. Some people can descend in a more streamlined manner and kick down all the way.

Your own method is something you'll have to find for yourself as you work towards your goal depth. As you gain more experience doing depth dives and get progressively deeper, you'll eventually settle into a routine that is most comfortable and efficient for you. Always practice with at least one competent buddy and don't go more than a few metres deeper than your previous personal best.

Tom
 

Jesper Juul

New Member
Dec 26, 2001
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Draw your graphs online

Hello freediving friends

For the purpose of discussing diving profiles, I have made a web-based tool for creating a JPG image of the dive.

The tool is in danish language, but "tegn graf" means "draw graph" and "vis eksempel" means "show me an example".

Just save the blue image and it should work. Please do not link to the image, but make a copy and attach it to your messages.

The URL for the tool is:
http://hfk.dk/graph/

Even though I can only dive to 35 meter, I have attached an image from the tool to show how it looks.

Br
Jesper Juul Pedersen
Copenhagen, Denmark
 
Last edited:

Jesper Juul

New Member
Dec 26, 2001
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forgot the image

I forgot to attach the image.

Br. Jesper
 

Attachments

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jero

New Member
Jul 20, 2001
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I can speak for myself that my dive times to 45-50 meters are about 1:35: to 1:50. I did a lot of "slow" dives to 45 meters for about 1:50-2:00, but I hope that is the past.

I am aiming to shorten my dive times to 1:30 1:35 for 50 m dive, since I beleive the good "speed" of the dive is very important for performance.

But, anyone should have his own tempo and deal with his own numbres.

For instance, in Ibiza Herbert Nitsch did a -86m dive for about 3:10 or something. Greek guy, Manolis did-81m dive for about 2:20 something (fast, ha?). I was watching it live and later on video, and I must say that Herbert Nitsch is one slow diver. But, I guess that this is the tempo that he choose because of saving oxygen... don't know

For the shutting down engines and sinking, I do that at over 30 meters, sometimes over 35m. I am negative bellow 15 meters but I would loose a lot of time if I start to sink earlier.
My descends last a bit longer then ascends somewhere about 55-45%.
 

Tom Lightfoot

Well-Known Member
Aug 21, 2001
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Cool graphs!

Hi Jesper,

Your online graphing utility is VERY cool. I'm afraid though that my mosquito is full of recreational dives right now, otherwise I'd post my own profile. I'm pretty sure though that my pace for that depth is very similar to yours on both the ascent and decent.

I'm always a bit surprised when I see these graphs because they usually show a fairly constant descent rate despite the large variation in buoyancy and the transition to a sink phase.

Tom

Thanks for sharing your numbers, Jero!
 

Tom Lightfoot

Well-Known Member
Aug 21, 2001
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50m profile

Erik is in Vancouver this week training for the CAFA Western Regional Championships which are this weekend. Erik and I braved the wind and snow yesterday to get some training dives under our belts.

My own last dive was 50m exactly so I remembered this thread and decided to try out Jesper's graphing program and post my profile.

As I've said before, my ascent tends to be faster than my descent. On the descent you can see a slight kink in the graph at 20m where I stop kicking, slow down and gradually gain speed as my air spaces compress. The trip up was quite fast (probably too fast) and my legs were burning much of the way up. This was my deepest ever dive with a 5mm suit.

Tom
 

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