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Beware the Buddy System

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
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C

cdavis

Well-Known Member
Jan 21, 2003
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Beware of the buddy system. You might get addicted and not be able to dive without your fix.

I come out of a "go for broke" spearo background. Of course we always (well, usually) dove with a buddy. You know, like my buddy is somewhere in the same ocean, I'm just not exactly sure where. Of Course we dove alone. We weren't going to black out, not us. That's some rare thing that happens to somebody else. Never really thought about it. The way we dove was just what you did. Amazing we are all still breathing.

Well, enter Deeper Blue, Performance Freediving, learning how to dive much deeper and longer and safer, getting to play rescue diver for a couple of blackouts during recreational dives that were supposed to be low key. Learned a lot. For the last 3 years or so I've always arranged it so I was diving in a fairly tight buddy system. No big deal, its just what we did. That brings me to last Friday.

I had the opportunity to dive an extremely nice spot, deep, very clear, super easy conditions, lots of the kind of wildlife that doesn't bite, unspoiled, a sweet place. The only drawback was I could not scare up a buddy. Well, not to worry, I won't push things. This will be fine.. . . . . . until I actually started to get in the water. Then, I suddenly realized I wasn't comfortable, I did not like something. No, I actively disliked the idea of diving alone. I'd come a long way, to a great spot, and I was actually a little afraid to dive. This from a guy who all his friends consider a one track, diving fanatic who never lets ANYTHING stop him. It was weird, bizarre. I figured it would pass, surely. So, I got in. Great conditions, very pretty. I expected to get comfortable quick and go from there. No chance. I stayed more or less distinctly uncomfortable. Cut my "no urge to breathe" time by almost 20 seconds. It slowly dawned on me that I was seriously addicted to buddy diving, had not had my fix and needed it. Broke it off after about an hour and got out.

Well, I think all this is a good thing, but I got to admit, there is a bit of uncertainty.

Connor
 
DivingDane

DivingDane

1BREATH Freediving
Jul 24, 2007
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Agreed mate, having a good buddy to turns an average dive into a great dive. I'm the same I can never comfortably dive deep with nobody else around. Not a bad thing just frustrating when you can't find a buddy you trust!
 
flying_spanner

flying_spanner

Gravity Is Optional
Sep 20, 2007
138
27
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Agreed mate, having a good buddy to turns an average dive into a great dive. I'm the same I can never comfortably dive deep with nobody else around. Not a bad thing just frustrating when you can't find a buddy you trust!

Trust is the operative word. I have never managed to pus out my Dynamic PB without a buddy who I know to be very experienced at saftey diving.

When I do have a good, reliable, and suitably skilled buddy in the pool with me I can simply relax and focus on the task at hand.
 
Tony Babowicz

Tony Babowicz

Well-Known Member
Aug 20, 2007
352
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Geez Connor,
I don't recall getting a phone call or email. If you went where I think you did, I would have loved to go. I can't wait until I'm invited again. (hint,hint)
 
C

cdavis

Well-Known Member
Jan 21, 2003
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Ah Tony, I sure would not have any problem scaring up a buddy for the Mud Puddle. That's coming soon, patience. This was Troy Springs, an hour west of Gainesville.

Oh yeah, how was Hawaii? Interesting video I saw a few days ago.

Connor
 
azapa

azapa

51% freediver 49% spearo
Jan 31, 2007
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mud puddle! can i go too?

seriously though, that "itch" to have good safety gets stronger by the day for me too. I often spear alone, or in the same piece of ocean as my "buddy" which is the same thing as solo diving. It's just not fun anymore.
 
acevedo joseph

acevedo joseph

New Member
Feb 25, 2006
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Thanks for sharing Connor , I feel the same way 100% , its all about the experience !!, And having a good buddy to share it just makes it that much better ,,,Joe
 
Jellythings

Jellythings

Active Member
Oct 5, 2017
44
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I don't think there is any such thing as "complete relaxation" on solo water fun unless one has alexithymia and simply cannot feel fear.
 
Sorandril

Sorandril

Member
Jun 13, 2020
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I don't think there is any such thing as "complete relaxation" on solo water fun unless one has alexithymia and simply cannot feel fear.
I really don’t think that’s alexithymia. More like aquaphilia maybe :p
 
Sorandril

Sorandril

Member
Jun 13, 2020
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I really don’t think that’s alexithymia. More like aquaphilia maybe :p
Anyhow for whatever reason I am totally relaxed in the water, but I also don’t generally fear death either. You can go ahead and call that a disorder as well I’m used to it.
 
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marco15499

marco15499

Laguneros Spearfishing
Apr 4, 2011
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Well, I don't consider myself as a freediver but a spearfisherman. Even if I beleive that the buddy system is the way to go, I have always said that you cannot rely your own life to another person. Especially when spearfishing, when there are many factors that could distract your buddy.
Each one of us must be responsible enough to take care of our own life.
 
Sorandril

Sorandril

Member
Jun 13, 2020
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Well, I don't consider myself as a freediver but a spearfisherman. Even if I beleive that the buddy system is the way to go, I have always said that you cannot rely your own life to another person. Especially when spearfishing, when there are many factors that could distract your buddy.
Each one of us must be responsible enough to take care of our own life.
And right below this was an ad for the Sens07Vest....
 
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C

cdavis

Well-Known Member
Jan 21, 2003
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Marco,

I totally agree you can't absolutely rely on your buddy for your life. But having witnessed a BO when the diver was apparently no where near his limits and had no warning, no urge to breathe, nothing, I'm a strong proponent of buddy diving. We spear in clear water where a buddy system puts more fish in the boat, if you know what you are doing. I've tried spearing and buddying in poor vis and it is extremely hard, makes me crazy. I don't have a good answer to that. If Im diving in conditions were a tight buddy system is hard or have inexperienced buddies, I wear an FRV. IMHO, all spearos in poor vis or diving alone should do the same.
 
C

cdavis

Well-Known Member
Jan 21, 2003
4,064
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The FRV has two co2 cylinders. It will bring you up from in excess of 30m. When it goes off, you are headed for the surface, no argument. Not good in overhead environments.
 
T

TimHouTX

Member
Aug 14, 2019
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The FRV has two co2 cylinders. It will bring you up from in excess of 30m. When it goes off, you are headed for the surface, no argument. Not good in overhead environments.
Well, sure. I meant before deployment. I wear a weight vest AND belt and was curious.
 
7BDiver

7BDiver

Active Member
Sep 5, 2019
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I truly don't understand and have a hard time believing the concept of someone blacking out during a "well within their limits" dive. Are we talking about people that simply don't have an urge to breath nor a strong signal/urge to breath, do they have heart complications or low blood pressure due to stress that makes them faint? How do we distinguish between someone fainting or truly out of oxygen having gone beyond their limits? Is there a medical assessment one can evaluate themselves or a buddy for fitness before a dive?
 
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7BDiver

7BDiver

Active Member
Sep 5, 2019
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How are the symptoms of a shallow water blackout that is considered "within limits" compared to someone that became hypoxic? Are they pale in the face, has there ever been a shallow water blackout reported with someone inverted, is returning blood flow from the legs hindered due to being too relaxed?
 
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C

cdavis

Well-Known Member
Jan 21, 2003
4,064
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The FRV is neutral before it inflates. It adds a little drag, but if you are wearing a wetsuit an carrying a big gun, you won't notice.
 
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