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CO2 Table Dry Static training questions

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
It can take a long time to get an up-to-date response or contact with relevant users.
Mavis Pacaldo

Mavis Pacaldo

New Member
Sep 5, 2017
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0
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I am a complete newbie in freediving and havent really gone deep past 10m so I'm starting on training dry STA as of now and need some solid advice from experienced freedivers if I am currently doing it right or i need some adjustments or whatnot.

Currently im doing a CO2 table with 8 breath ups and 8 constant 50s holds. I am doing a 2 second hold between breaths (relaxation breath) and breath holds in 4 air compartments (Diaphraghm, ribs, lungs and throat)

My current table is like this:

Relaxation Breath up
2:30
2:15
2:00
1:45
1:30
1:15
1:00
1:00

Hold
00:50 x 8

This is based on my Maximum Breath Hold of 1:40 (first attempt).

Questions:
What is the suggested frequency of doing CO2 tables per day or per week?

And when do remeasure my max breath hold again? I've only read how to do the CO2 tables but I haven't seen how many times it must be done (as recommended) and how often to measure Max breath hold to adjust the tables.

And am I in the right track?

Thank you and any feedback will be very much appreciated.
 
SolidHit

SolidHit

Member
Jul 9, 2017
8
2
13
32
Hello mate,
I am newbie too but maybe have some more expierience...I think doing tables 3-4 times per week is okay. You can add a thing called apnea walking - you hold breath and start walking but dont hold you breath too much long because there is a risk of blackout and you can wound you head or something so with this be careful. Also try search in this forums because there are tons about this theme from very expirienced people for example look this :
https://forums.deeperblue.com/threads/question-regarding-tables.109281/#post-968573
I recommend you read both articles what Zym mentioned in his last post.
About your question you can shorten your breath up time as much as last 2 rounds will be only 15 second breath up. When its starts seems to be easy you can try your maximum static apnea again and move on. You are on right track the results will come soon :)
 
Mavis Pacaldo

Mavis Pacaldo

New Member
Sep 5, 2017
5
0
1
35
Hello mate,
I am newbie too but maybe have some more expierience...I think doing tables 3-4 times per week is okay. You can add a thing called apnea walking - you hold breath and start walking but dont hold you breath too much long because there is a risk of blackout and you can wound you head or something so with this be careful. Also try search in this forums because there are tons about this theme from very expirienced people for example look this :
https://forums.deeperblue.com/threads/question-regarding-tables.109281/#post-968573
I recommend you read both articles what Zym mentioned in his last post.
About your question you can shorten your breath up time as much as last 2 rounds will be only 15 second breath up. When its starts seems to be easy you can try your maximum static apnea again and move on. You are on right track the results will come soon :)

Thanks man, your input is much appreciated and your suggestions. Indeed there are days that I can't seem to hold 50s easily and there are days that it passes fly with no prob. I think ill hold in for the current setup for now.
 
SolidHit

SolidHit

Member
Jul 9, 2017
8
2
13
32
It could be sometimes better sometimes worse... If you want fast improve maybe you should try this tables:
https://wefreedive.com/resources/training/2-the-evolution-of-co2-training-tables
In short its about breath hold one exhale one inhale and breath hold again. Point is that you learn your body accept co2 much faster than in tabs what you do. This is because you dont have time to ventilate your air gas so co2 volume is raising rapidly. Then you should hold some contractions for start maybe 5-10 later more even 60. This metod is much simplier shorter and more effective.
 
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N

Nootkax

New Member
Dec 14, 2021
7
0
1
34
It could be sometimes better sometimes worse... If you want fast improve maybe you should try this tables:
https://wefreedive.com/resources/training/2-the-evolution-of-co2-training-tables
In short its about breath hold one exhale one inhale and breath hold again. Point is that you learn your body accept co2 much faster than in tabs what you do. This is because you dont have time to ventilate your air gas so co2 volume is raising rapidly. Then you should hold some contractions for start maybe 5-10 later more even 60. This metod is much simplier shorter and more effective.
That's interesting I don't 100% understand how to use this table yet.
Can someone explain again for me ?
I breathup then hold breath as long as I can and when first contraction comes i keep holding for 45 sec and then do this 8 times ?
 
erixsparhawk

erixsparhawk

Member
Apr 17, 2021
44
14
23
37
The website starts by describing regular CO2 tables. Fixed breath hold each round and a reduced breath-up time between rounds. The link that is posted describes a different type of CO2 table that I will call the "struggle table". You choose a difficulty by selecting how much struggle time you will add to each breath hold. Like 45 seconds. Then you hold your breath until you feel your 1st contraction and then continue to hold your breath for 45 seconds longer. After that you get to take 1 recovery breath and you begin again holding your breath until your first contraction and then adding 45 more seconds. One recovery breath, repeat 8 times.
This type of CO2 table has recently fallen out of favor and people are doing what I call "No-Struggle" CO2 tables now. In no-struggle tables you do your breath work only with the first few contractions or gentle contractions. Why?
Some people found that struggle CO2 tables would make contractions happen earlier. Also struggle CO2 tables were mentally fatiguing for people and they were unable to keep to a training schedule or started to hate training, or would start giving up. Also, it is hard to become a relaxed diver when you are practicing struggling.

Personally, I get best results from doing easy (40-50% of max breath hold) regular CO2 tables on an almost daily bases. They are fun for be partially because they are easy, and I don't notice each week when I make them 5 sec more difficult from the previous week.
 
N

Nootkax

New Member
Dec 14, 2021
7
0
1
34
The website starts by describing regular CO2 tables. Fixed breath hold each round and a reduced breath-up time between rounds. The link that is posted describes a different type of CO2 table that I will call the "struggle table". You choose a difficulty by selecting how much struggle time you will add to each breath hold. Like 45 seconds. Then you hold your breath until you feel your 1st contraction and then continue to hold your breath for 45 seconds longer. After that you get to take 1 recovery breath and you begin again holding your breath until your first contraction and then adding 45 more seconds. One recovery breath, repeat 8 times.
This type of CO2 table has recently fallen out of favor and people are doing what I call "No-Struggle" CO2 tables now. In no-struggle tables you do your breath work only with the first few contractions or gentle contractions. Why?
Some people found that struggle CO2 tables would make contractions happen earlier. Also struggle CO2 tables were mentally fatiguing for people and they were unable to keep to a training schedule or started to hate training, or would start giving up. Also, it is hard to become a relaxed diver when you are practicing struggling.

Personally, I get best results from doing easy (40-50% of max breath hold) regular CO2 tables on an almost daily bases. They are fun for be partially because they are easy, and I don't notice each week when I make them 5 sec more difficult from the previous week.
Thanks so much for explaining.
So if I do a normal CO2 table like this:
My max breath hold is 1:30

Should I go for 2 min breath up then hold 45 sec. Then reduce breath up by 15 sec and hold again 45 sec.
Keep reducing breathup by 15 sec until I end up at 15 sec and 45 sec breath hold?

Sorry if that explanation is confusing
 
erixsparhawk

erixsparhawk

Member
Apr 17, 2021
44
14
23
37
Thanks so much for explaining.
So if I do a normal CO2 table like this:
My max breath hold is 1:30

Should I go for 2 min breath up then hold 45 sec. Then reduce breath up by 15 sec and hold again 45 sec.
Keep reducing breathup by 15 sec until I end up at 15 sec and 45 sec breath hold?

Sorry if that explanation is confusing
Exactly
 
K

kfox

New Member
Jan 3, 2022
3
0
1
45
I have been doing a quite simple table recently that I really like. I can also tell that in a standard CO2 table I have improved when my contractions start by this practice. Maybe this shows up on other places in the forum but here it is:

3-4 minutes of relaxed focused breathing.
Hold until first contraction - Take 8 breaths
Hold until first contraction - Take 7 breaths
Hold until first contraction - Take 7 breaths
Hold until first contraction - Take 7 breaths
Hold until first contraction - Take 7 breaths
Hold until first contraction - Take 7 breaths
Hold until first contraction - Take 7 breaths
Hold until first contraction - Take 7 breaths
 
K

kfox

New Member
Jan 3, 2022
3
0
1
45
I have been doing a quite simple table recently that I really like. I can also tell that in a standard CO2 table I have improved when my contractions start by this practice. Maybe this shows up on other places in the forum but here it is:

3-4 minutes of relaxed focused breathing.
Hold until first contraction - Take 8 breaths
Hold until first contraction - Take 7 breaths
Hold until first contraction - Take 7 breaths
Hold until first contraction - Take 7 breaths
Hold until first contraction - Take 7 breaths
Hold until first contraction - Take 7 breaths
Hold until first contraction - Take 7 breaths
Hold until first contraction - Take 7 breaths
Oops!! Must have hit post before I was done
Hold until first contraction - Take 8 breaths
Hold until first contraction - Take 7 breaths
Hold until first contraction - Take 6 breaths
Hold until first contraction - Take 5 breaths
Hold until first contraction - Take 4 breaths
Hold until first contraction - Take 3 breaths
Hold until first contraction - Take 2 breaths
Hold until first contraction - Done!

No struggle and the focus is really just on staying relaxed
 
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