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Dummies Guide to Rigging a Speargun

What great information,, so yo leave your gun rigged with the mono test line and after the binge and clip you attach your spearing line from the reel, correct. I have not seen a close up of this or do you simply remove the bungee and run the line from your reel to the swivel that attaches to the mono line on your spear?
yes the typical way is to remove the bungi. The bungi primarily serves to keep the shooting line taunt before the shot. With a reel, the drag is generally set just tight enough to keep the shooting line from falling off the gun prior to the shot.
 
Likes: Mr. X

Derekn

Rubber Bandit
May 26, 2010
653
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98
Wexford, Ireland
What great information,, so yo leave your gun rigged with the mono test line and after the binge and clip you attach your spearing line from the reel, correct. I have not seen a close up of this or do you simply remove the bungee and run the line from your reel to the swivel that attaches to the mono line on your spear?
I would use a swivel and clip when attaching the nylon from the reel to the mono, there may be times you will need to detach/re-attach it quickly when in the water. If your spear gets trapped in a rock or it may be easier to pull the line through a speared fish or if your line becomes tangled for instance.
 

Mr. X

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The bungee can also act as a shock absorber, protecting your spear-line & the fish against sudden impulsive tensions (a fairly common escape tactic for some fishes - the spear can tear through the body of a speared fish in some circumstances).

A heavy duty swivel is a good idea; mullet for example, will often twist around a lot once speared (even with a head shot).

An inexpensive, lightweight alternative to a clip is to tie a cord from the muzzle/muzzle bungee to the spearline using a sheet-bend or double-sheet bend knot. A sheet-bend is easier to undo that a double sheet-bend but I have more confidence in the latter - it's up to you though to satisfy yourself as to the safety & reliability of your chosen approach. I sometimes use a tiny rubber O-ring to keep the end of the cord pulled back & neat. [Omer include some black braided cord, around 2 or 3mm, which is ideal for this task. You can also buy, e.g. from Apnea.co.uk].

In practice, undoing a clip can be tricky in the water (esp. when gloved)*, although I have done this in order to pull a spear through a fish on several occasions, but am more reluctant to do so these days. Undoing a double sheet-bend is even more unappealing, such that careful re-positioning of the flopper/barb on the spear followed by brute strength are usually the preferred option for me.

* Especially the heavy duty RA ones, less so (the slightly too) lightweight swivel clip on the Beuchat bungee - although the shape of clip itself can require rather too much dexterity for cold, gloved hands IMHO.
 
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glockerjax

Well-Known Member
Nov 2, 2011
56
3
48
philippines
Hi Bros. recently got my very 1st speargun.. its an omer camu 95.. (im a certified newbie :) ) need help with rigging the gun. my 95 has a reel installed already. can anyone who owns with the same gun email me pictures as to how it looks like and how.. been reading this thread and its starting to be super complicated.. haha

tnx in advance! :)
 
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Moesab

New Member
May 19, 2014
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Just an update on the bungee set up... I switched back to the full bungee minus the dyneema leader, seems to flow better and it holds up well enough that when it gets too fugly (frayed) to be replaced it has pretty much paid for itself...
Hello,

Would it be possible for somebody to post a picture of the bungee setup? Am interested as I am trying to decide whether to buy a reel or go for the bungee option.

Don't intend to do a lot of dives deeper then 5 meters at this moment.

Rgds
 
Sep 29, 2015
9
0
11
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Fort Lauderdale
hey guys

i have a riffe padauk and was wondering if it would be safe to tie a thin piece of rope from the hole in the butt of the gun to the tuna clip of my float line rather than buying all the crimping materials. would it be okay to do that or should i stop being a cheap ass and buy the crimping supplies?
 

Mr. X

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Tying (with an appropriate knot, carefully tied & tightened) should be ok. I don't think crimping is really normal for float lines or for attaching spearguns to float lines. I have a loop of knotted climbing accessory cord on the butt of my speargun with a tuna/Orcas clip (I probably used a fisherman's knot - smaller & simpler than the double-fisherman's used on climbing protection - although a flat overhand knot would be simpler alternative that I might use). With rope, you usually either knot it, splice it or fold & whip it with cord.

Crimps are usually used for monofilament spear-lines, for the attachment to the spear and for the attachment to the muzzle of the speargun (or to provide a loop that can be attached to a muzzle bungee or cord). Crimps are not that expensive, if you shop around, and they are soft so you don't really need those big, expensive, fancy crimpers; I use a cheap pair of bi-cusped electrical crimpers which cost less than £5 and they work fine, more than tough enough (I think Foxfish uses long nose pliers). If you don't have crimps, I have used whipping cord & superglue (as recommended by Magpie) and it works just fine too.
 

Mr. X

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HI Milton, perhaps you came across, either:

(a) something called a "break-away rig", which is sometimes used by those spearing very large pelagic fish, such a tuna or bill fish. In that case, often a monofilament spearline is connected to the float-line instead of to the speargun's muzzle, usually via some sort of simple friction holding mechanism (often a piece of bungee rubber through a ring or tube). When a large fish is speared, the fish, spear, spear-line and float-line connect it to the float(s)*, leaving the free spearfisher free with the speargun in hand.

(b) A "ghost leader" (as sold by Rob Allen) - essentially a length of hard-to-see monofilament used as an extension at the end of the float-line which connects to butt of the speargun. The idea is to make the spearo/speara less visible/detectable by making floatline less visible and more hydrodynamic (i.e. streamline) when the spearer is hiding in ambush on the sea bed/rocks/in the weed. It's also not a bad way to extend your float-line if you find it too short. Strimmer (AmE. weedwacker) cord or very heavy fishing line (e.g. 300lb) would normally be used for this.

*For large fish, this usually requires a very large float (e.g. Tommy Botha float - which looks like half a sheet of thick wall insulation foam with yacht cleats) and/or 2 floats - often a solid first float (to resist compression during submersion) and, perhaps, a larger inflatable second float (e.g. 35l). RA also have float-line break-away pouch, which I believe is sometimes used between 2 floats(?).
 
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Sep 29, 2015
9
0
11
27
Fort Lauderdale
HI Milton, perhaps you came across, either:

(a) something called a "break-away rig", which is sometimes used by those spearing very large pelagic fish, such a tuna or bill fish. In that case, often a monofilament spearline is connected to the float-line instead of to the speargun's muzzle, usually via some some of simple friction holding mechanism. When a large fish is speared, the fish, spear, spear-line and float-line connect it to the float(s)*, leaving the free spearfisher free with the speargun in hand.

(b) A "ghost leader" (as sold by Rob Allen) - essentially a length of hard-to-see monofilament used as an extension at the end of the float-line which connects to butt of the speargun. The idea is to make the spearo/speara less visible/detectable by making floatline less visible and more hydrodynamic (i.e. streamline) when the spearer is hiding in ambush on the sea bed/rocks/in the weed. It's also not a bad way to extend your float-line if you find it too short. Strimmer (AmE. weedwacker) cord or very heavy fishing line (e.g. 300lb) would normally be used for this.
Yea I think it was something along the lines of (b). Never knew what it was, that sounds useful though. Thanks!