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Dynamic vs constant weight

Discussion in 'Beginner Freediving Q&A' started by Agostino, Apr 17, 2018.

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Is there a constant weight equivalent of dynamic?

  1. Yes

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. No

    1 vote(s)
    100.0%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. Agostino

    Agostino New Member

    Local Time:
    11:50 PM
    Hi all,
    Just wondering if there is a constant weight equivalent for dynamic .
    Say I did 25m dynamic is there an equivalent depth for constant weight?
    Cheers!
     
  2. HLanger1955

    HLanger1955 Member

    Local Time:
    5:50 PM
    Don't think there is a strict one2one relation. However, freediver levels, such as AIDA or Apnea Academy request - for a level 1, 2, 3 both a minimum depth in constant, DYN, DNF and static breathhold. For instance, an Apnea Academy level 3 (at my times) requested depth 30 m, DYN 75 m, DNF 50 m, and static 4 min. Those numbers may provide some guide line, but things certainly change looking at the indivdual...
     
  3. Agostino

    Agostino New Member

    Local Time:
    11:50 PM
    Thank you for your reply.
    I was just looking for a way to correlate them as the maximum depth where I live is only 20m and I don't have another way to monitor my progress other than pool.
    Thanks again
     
  4. Nathan Vinski

    Nathan Vinski Active Member

    Local Time:
    11:50 AM
    from a breathhold perspective you can kinda simulate depth in the pool by adjusting dive profiles.

    For example in a 20m pool you can do (20m dyn/25sec STA/ 40m DYN) and simulate the effort profile of a 40m CWT dive. This is probably the closest you can come to making "ability estimates" as it will match dive time and Finning/free-falling.

    Again it's not perfect and you will have to remember that in depth dive response will be much better and your dive time potential could be longer, but your muscles will suffer more.

    Personally my maximum (close to hypoxic limit) for this in the pool is "50m" (25 dyn, 30sec, 50 dyn) but in depth 60 is far from my hypoxic limit. On the other hand "50m" in the pool is easy on the legs with bi fins, but 60m CWT bi fin is very close to my muscular limit. So let's say with the pool exercise estimate +10-15m in depth, but much much harder on the muscles.
     
  5. Agostino

    Agostino New Member

    Local Time:
    11:50 PM
    Thank you, that helps a lot.
    Reading your answer another question pops in my mind: how do you know when you are close to your hypoxic limit?
    In the course they thought me that when you feel "the urge to breath" it's not yiur body asking for oxygen but the co2 building up. So, how do you differentiate the 2 and how do you know when you actually need oxygen?
    Thank you so much!
     
  6. Mark Jeffery

    Mark Jeffery Well-Known Member

    Local Time:
    11:50 AM
    "how do you know when you actually need oxygen" - careful, you are getting into dangerous territory here. There is no safe way to know when you are running out of oxygen - you can pass out in seconds when you get your warning - too late. You MUST have a buddy if you expect to be pushing yourself to the point of blackout - and best only do that in pool where you can be seen by your "extremely competent" buddy. Many will get tunnel vision, ringing in ears, or loss of vision before they pass out. Best to experiment with your personal responses on dry land and then not go near them in the water.
     
    SubSub likes this.
  7. Agostino

    Agostino New Member

    Local Time:
    11:50 PM
    I always dive with a buddy who has had proper training and when i do more than 25m apnea he follows me from the surface, just in case.
    But my question is, how do I know how much to push? In a matter of weeks I went fron 25m to 75m and felt like I could easily get to 100m but was scared to black out. How do I know if I have enough oxygen to make It?
    Thanks
     
  8. Mark Jeffery

    Mark Jeffery Well-Known Member

    Local Time:
    11:50 AM
    Great that you have a buddy. Make sure he can recognize when/if you are losing consciousness - there are videos on youtube of dynamic blackouts - usually the diver starts to falter, the stroke becomes erratic or "weak" looking, loses air. Often the diver knows he is about to lose it and stops - to late - and he stands up and then slides back in the water unconscious. When I've been hypoxic I hear ringing in my ears and see spots or light burst in my vision. I had a samba once, I reached the wall and as I surfaced my vision went completely black. I was holding the wall and luckily I came back - just barely avoided a complete blackout.
     
  9. Agostino

    Agostino New Member

    Local Time:
    11:50 PM
    Thank you Mark
     
  10. Nathan Vinski

    Nathan Vinski Active Member

    Local Time:
    11:50 AM
    Very carefully.

    Like mark said, blackouts and LMCs can come without warning. All performances and progressions should be step by step. So, if you do 75m DYN and the recovery is easy, next time you can try 80m.. and so on. If a dive is "harder", hard recovery, blue lips, a bit weaker you are getting really close to your limit. Then you need to step back and train before making more progress.

    I think it's safer to use buddy feedback and monitor recoveries to see how close you are to your limit and making step by step progressions. Judging your limit during a dive is very hard and you are in high risk of LMC, or BO.
     
  11. Mark Jeffery

    Mark Jeffery Well-Known Member

    Local Time:
    11:50 AM
    And more. In case you are thinking about experimenting and doing statics to the point of blackout (fun times!) - note that static blackout will probably feel different than a dynamic blackout - and you should NOT use one to gauge the other. In my case (done only twice) when I hold my breath to the point of blackout - for the last 30 or 45 seconds I get plenty of warning - echo in ears, loss of vision, gurgling bowels. But it is NOT safe to assume this will translate to a dynamic blackout. Doing statics you slowly consume oxygen and there is a gentler transition to hypoxia. But when doing dynamics you are actively and rapidly depleting oxygen - by the time you notice hypoxic symptoms it may already be too late. Add to that - when you stand up and raise your head above water there is an instant flow of blood out of your head due to gravity - makes things even worse. And doing in-water statics can kill you too - you need to use the buddy finger tap system.
     
  12. Agostino

    Agostino New Member

    Local Time:
    11:50 PM
    Yes, I've been thought that too. I'm so glad I took a proper course; it's definitely a safe sport if you take all the precautions otherwise it can be dangerous.
    You seem very experienced. How long have you been doing It? Do you compete?
    Pbs?
     
  13. Mark Jeffery

    Mark Jeffery Well-Known Member

    Local Time:
    11:50 AM
    I have been freediving for a long time - but never for competition. My breath holds to blackout were when I was learning - I was just trying to see how long I could go. I don't do that any more. But when I have a competent buddy I like to push myself in dynamics.
     
  14. Agostino

    Agostino New Member

    Local Time:
    11:50 PM
    That makes sense
    Thanks a lot for your help