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Filling your lungs to max while in wetsuit - how to do it better?

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
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Mlaen

Making progress...
Jun 22, 2003
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I know that while in wetsuit you can't fill your lungs like on dry land but I still think that I don't fill my lungs enough, and that with little excericse I could improve that.I just don't know what king of excercises that would be...
I suppose that I should excercise my muscles around the chest but I don't know how so, once again, I need you help... How did you solve this problem (If you ever had it)?

PS.
excuse if english is not good, it's not my native language
 

Kars

Well-Known Member
Oct 24, 2003
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Hehe, nobody get shot on DB for their 'bad' English :)

First check your suit, is it a apneasuit?
There is a lof of difference between a normal diving suit and a apneasuit, the latter is MUCH more flexible.
In case you have a normal diving suit, start saving for a apnea suit, its worth every penny! (I recomment a tailormade suit from Elios)

In case you do have a apnea suit, use more soap when putting it on. It should glide on :)
Use a rubber weightbelt, and put is on your hips instead of on the middle, leaving you much more room for air.

Have you last meal 4 hours before you dive.

On the shore while you have only your pants on, do a little stretching, the sungreet is a very nice one. It wil make your muscles loose, and relaxed, and allow for more air to be stored.

Now on to the breathing technique.
Breath in filling up from below, deep belly, middle, chest, throught, than you may want to 'pack' some extra air.
Perform a search on packing and technique on DB for the detailed info on this technique.

There is an advantage to your problem as you learn the equalisation techniques better, with less air.

Good luck!

Kars.
 

Mlaen

Making progress...
Jun 22, 2003
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First check your suit, is it a apneasuit?
I have OMER - Ocean mimetic - use is for freediving and spearfishing

Use a rubber weightbelt, and put is on your hips instead of on the middle, leaving you much more room for air.
I have rubber one... I'll try with hips...

Have you last meal 4 hours before you dive.
I dive at least 2 hours after meal sometimes more...

On the shore while you have only your pants on, do a little stretching, the sungreet is a very nice one.
Can you explain that sungreet, never heard of it before, how do you do it?

Now on to the breathing technique.
Breath in filling up from below, deep belly, middle, chest, throught, than you may want to 'pack' some extra air.

I know the breathing technique, and can really fill my lungs on the shore but in the water it's totaly different story :(

Good luck!
Thanx!
 
Last edited:

Erik

Well-Known Member
Jan 21, 2001
4,731
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Originally posted by Mlaen

I know the breathing technique, and can really fill my lungs on the shore but in the water it's totaly different story :(



I would ask what position you are in while taking that last breath?
If you lay on your back you will be less submerged and will not have to fight the pressure to fill your lungs. In a face down position, with your belly more submerged, chances are that that water pressure will work against you.
Also, don't try too hard to fill your lungs on one breath: it takes too much energy....take a 'good' breath then add a few packs to top off your lungs. It will take less energy and you will stay more relaxed.
Cheers,
Erik Y.
 

naiad

Apnea Carp
Supporter
Oct 11, 2003
2,897
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Is the suit too small around the chest? This could be a problem.

The weightbelt thing is interesting - I make it tight when I first put it on, so it doesn't fall off, but my breathing actually forces it until it is loose! :D

A few days ago I was doing dynamics when my weightbelt fell off, I caught it in my hand, and my swimming cap, under pressure from my long hair crammed into it, started to come off. I surfaced and got onto the side of the pool to sort out these technical problems, hoping that nobody had seen the whole performance.

Lucia
 

immerlustig

BlueSkunk
Aug 17, 2002
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inhaling while on your belly is more strenuous due to waterpressure against which you have to inhale. when doing a duck-dive exhale and then do a little forward kick with arms extended. as you glide forward start inahling and at the same time raise your upper body out of the water a bit using your arms (which are pointing forward). then drop your arms down vertical but continue inhaling (you get less air when your arms are outstretched over your head). if you time it properly you finish inhaling to the max when your arms are almost pointing down vertically and in one fluid motion you continue the duck-dive.

if you need even more air try this: make sure your body is high up on the surface (legs not hanging down, butt sticking out of the water), let your arms hang down by your side and inhale as much as possible. after this do the forward kick to initiate the duckdive. as you glide forward put your arms over your head and snorkelpack. continue packing as your arms are dropping down. you should finish snorkelpacking before you come to a complete stop, then finish the duck-dive. try being fluid during the whole maneuver.

if all that is not your style, try breathing up on your back. your chest is higher out of the water which makes for a bigger inhale compared to inhaling on your belly. make sure your legs are up on the surface and not hanging down. kick forward gently as you inhale, roll on your belly and dive. what i find very useful is to stay on your belly for a split second to orient yourself and to have actually finished the rolling motion. otherwise you might start ducking down while your legs are still twisted which usually makes for a dodgy duck-dive.

these days i prefer the breath-up on my belly, including the snorkelpacking even though i pack quicker on my back. but it saves me some extra movement and i am lazy.

cheers

roland

:cool:
 
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