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Fish and mercury

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
It can take a long time to get an up-to-date response or contact with relevant users.

Adrian

Deeper Blue Beachcomber
Supporter
Nov 23, 2002
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For those who eat a lot of fish this might be interesting...or not! This is an excerpt from:

ORGANIC BYTES #30
Food and Consumer News Tidbits with an Edge!
3/29/2004 By Organic Consumers Association

SCARY FISH FACTS
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has released new safety guidelines for fish consumption, due to ever-increasing levels of mercury contamination. The fish containing the highest levels of mercury are: shark, swordfish, king mackerel and tilefish. The guidelines suggest eating up to two meals a week (totaling 12 ounces) of fish that are low in mercury such as shrimp, canned light tuna, salmon, pollock and catfish.

http://www.organicconsumers.org/foodsafety/fish032204.cfm


Adrian
 

sammydive

New Member
Sep 11, 2003
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Just a couple days ago I saw fresh yellow fin tuna for $4.99lb at my local grocery store. Last year it was from $12.99 to $8.99. Maybe this will be good for us spearos that want to spear a yellowfin, but I pity the fishermen who make a living on large offshore fish. The mercury scare along with fuel prices is going to put many out of business.
Sammy
 

DeepThought

Freediving Sloth
Sep 8, 2002
2,334
410
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Thank you public health officer Adrain. :)
I think I heard about those limitations regarding those fish (shark swordfish etc.) long time ago actually. The reasoning was that since they are top on the food chain, stuff like mercury that are found in most fish (including fish they it) will be found in greater concentrations.

Another disturbing thing I found out is that some makers don't really smoke their salmon, but add nitrates to make it taste like it. And that in most countries it is perfectly legal to sell it as smoked salmon.
The problem with nitrates is that it increases the chance for some sort of colon cancer (don't remember). I think this goes also for other types of meat products by the way.

hhhmmmm, smoked salmon. arrhhhhh.....:p
 

Adrian

Deeper Blue Beachcomber
Supporter
Nov 23, 2002
2,691
533
218
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the bane of freedivers

Ug...nitrates :(

All the water in our area is polluted with nitrates and I have to buy bottled water for drinking and cooking. I think I'm going to send the bill to the govenment! One of the problems of nitrates is that it can cause cyanosis in infants and elderly people. Cyanosis happens when there is a lack of oxygen in the hemoglobin. Just what we need as freedivers! So make a fuss where you buy your salmon and if it is not indicated in the label ask your store to buy authentic smoked salmon.

"Down with all artificial causes of cyanosis except breath holding!"
- new war cry of the ECO-FREEDIVERS


Adrian
 

DeepThought

Freediving Sloth
Sep 8, 2002
2,334
410
173
42
I didn't know n itrates cause cyanosis as well...:(
Does the nitrates in your water come from agriculture/fertilizers or what?
I don't think we have that problem here, but anyhow we have a water purifier for the last 15 years or so. Works by filtering the water through a micronic filter, then active coal filter (not sure if that's the right translation), and also has a UV light that kills whatever might live there. Filters are replaced once in 6 months, light in 12.
I think it is cheaper then buying bottled water in a factor of 10 if not 100.
I have no clue if works against nitrates though.:confused:

Though I think that the carbon monoxide I breath everytime I'm forced to walk our streets near rush hour is much worse than any potential nitrate injestion...

About smoked salmon, it costs about 25$/kg where I live (if price hasn't risen since last time I checked). So if I get any it's only when randomly seeing it in attractive price. :(
 
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