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fishing line or dyneema to atach spear?

Boatwayupnorth

New Member
Jul 10, 2020
6
0
1
55
Hi, I'm building my first speargun. All went well so far - pics will follow :)
I'm completely new to this. If this is a stupid question, please bear with me. I have watched some videos on how to rig an open muzzle speargun and in most of them people use strong fishing line for the wraps, tie it to the spear and to the dyneema line on the reel by swagging.
Is there a particular reason for not tying the dyneema line directly to the spear with a bowline or something similar?
 
Mar 22, 2009
647
192
148
Hi, I'm building my first speargun. All went well so far - pics will follow :)
I'm completely new to this. If this is a stupid question, please bear with me. I have watched some videos on how to rig an open muzzle speargun and in most of them people use strong fishing line for the wraps, tie it to the spear and to the dyneema line on the reel by swagging.
Is there a particular reason for not tying the dyneema line directly to the spear with a bowline or something similar?

Sounds like a simple question, but there are a lot of issues. Generally people want to have a shooting line attached to the spear. At the junction with the line from the reel (or a muzzle bungi) it is beneficial to be able to detach the lines. This is often accomplished with a heavy duty snap swivel.

If a shaft fully penetrates a fish and then it ends up on the line and then spins, you end up with a tangled mess. If it is a very small fish, this is a minor annoyance, if it is a large fish and there are sharks around, this can be a big problem. So it is generally best to be able to unhook the line, fix the tangle, remove the fish off the end of the line and then reattach.

Dynema line is generally "soft". Which means it is more prone to tangling. For this reason (and also the reduced cost) most basic guns are rigged with monofilament (250 to 400-lb test). this line is stiffer so it is less likely to tangle and easier to untangle. It is also inexpensive to replace when it gets abraded on rock, coral, wreck. Dynema is more resistant to abrasion and is very strong and hard to cut, so some advanced divers may choose this option for certain situations.

In any regard, if you permanently attach the line to the shaft, you will end up having to cut it more frequently than you might like.

You can accomplish the connection with a knot, but it will be slower to re-tie in the water. Hope that answers your question.

And.. good luck with the new gun! I'm sure we would like to see pictures! (We offer wide selection of DIY gun- builder parts).

Thanks
dano
 

Boatwayupnorth

New Member
Jul 10, 2020
6
0
1
55
Sounds like a simple question, but there are a lot of issues. Generally people want to have a shooting line attached to the spear. At the junction with the line from the reel (or a muzzle bungi) it is beneficial to be able to detach the lines. This is often accomplished with a heavy duty snap swivel.

If a shaft fully penetrates a fish and then it ends up on the line and then spins, you end up with a tangled mess. If it is a very small fish, this is a minor annoyance, if it is a large fish and there are sharks around, this can be a big problem. So it is generally best to be able to unhook the line, fix the tangle, remove the fish off the end of the line and then reattach.

Dynema line is generally "soft". Which means it is more prone to tangling. For this reason (and also the reduced cost) most basic guns are rigged with monofilament (250 to 400-lb test). this line is stiffer so it is less likely to tangle and easier to untangle. It is also inexpensive to replace when it gets abraded on rock, coral, wreck. Dynema is more resistant to abrasion and is very strong and hard to cut, so some advanced divers may choose this option for certain situations.

In any regard, if you permanently attach the line to the shaft, you will end up having to cut it more frequently than you might like.

You can accomplish the connection with a knot, but it will be slower to re-tie in the water. Hope that answers your question.

And.. good luck with the new gun! I'm sure we would like to see pictures! (We offer wide selection of DIY gun- builder parts).

Thanks
dano
Hi Dano,
thank's a lot, that makes sense! Except for the sharks. The ones we have in Norway are either down far too deep or far to small to be a problem :)
It certainly makes sense to use a stiffer line and a quick disconnect, though.
Cheers
Walter
 
Mar 22, 2009
647
192
148
Hi Dano,
thank's a lot, that makes sense! Except for the sharks. The ones we have in Norway are either down far too deep or far to small to be a problem :)
It certainly makes sense to use a stiffer line and a quick disconnect, though.
Cheers
Walter
No sharks? You missing half the fun! LOL
 

burjegol

Well-Known Member
Nov 6, 2005
11
0
86
63
Having a quick disconnect is a very convenient way of attaching your spearshaft. I used to do this, and when I shot a fish which proved difficult to extract the spearshaft, I just disconnect it and pull the shaft through. I find it easier this way than having to pull out the spearshaft with sometimes the flopper gets snagged in the fish bones.
 

Andrew the fish

Well-Known Member
Oct 17, 2010
524
134
83
I remember something about dyneema slowing the shaft more than mono, it has been mentioned somewhere, backed by experimental data
 

vrokhlenko

Well-Known Member
Sep 22, 2002
244
56
118
55
Pure unjacketed dyneema does not hold the knot well. There is a specific and rather bulky knot that is required to avoid slipping. Some people REALLY went scientific and I even interacted with the inventor of such a knot. At the end I decided to use mono. People have a tendency also to use a line way thicker than they need. Unless you are about to suspend your huge catch on the shooting line in the air a cheap 200lb crimped mono is all you need. It will be stiff and a diameter of 1.3-1.4mm in size. The only problem i have (I shoot air gun with a slider on my shaft) is that the mono gets destructed in the attachment hole so I use timbles from Aliexpress for 1.5mm line. I modify them slightly to reduce the drag profile.
 

Boatwayupnorth

New Member
Jul 10, 2020
6
0
1
55
Having a quick disconnect is a very convenient way of attaching your spearshaft. I used to do this, and when I shot a fish which proved difficult to extract the spearshaft, I just disconnect it and pull the shaft through. I find it easier this way than having to pull out the spearshaft with sometimes the flopper gets snagged in the fish bones.
Sounds good, but doesn't it create lots of drag?
 

burjegol

Well-Known Member
Nov 6, 2005
11
0
86
63
Sounds good, but doesn't it create lots of drag?
Drag is not usually taken into equation as the usual range to shoot 2 to 3 M from speargun tip. My usual armament is a 90 mares cyrano or my modified 90 cm inverted rooler for long range shooting and a 70 mares jet for short range or inside rocks shooting. Hence, drag is not usually taken into consideration as the power is sufficient to overcome the drag caused by dynema and snap swivel.
 
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