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freediving is good for you

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
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cdavis

Well-Known Member
Jan 21, 2003
4,006
779
218
71
Well, I did something stupid and ended up in the hospital for two days with 3 broken ribs, punctured lung, a pneumothorax and cracked scapula. The bad news is no diving for 8 weeks. The good news is, it will all heal and I learned a lot of interesting stuff.

The docs wanted me to do frequent deep breathing to ward off pneumonia and gave me a spirometer(a gadget which measures lung capacity that I had wanted) to help me keep track. I tried it and the first attempt was horrifying to me, only 2000ml. The tech said most pneumorthorax suffers can't do 1000. Intrigued, I started working on the spirometer. About the 4th try, I maxed it out, 4250 ml., well short of my normal capacity, but considering the situation, reasonable. Mentioned this to the two thoracic docs who came to examine me and it was clear that one flat did not believe me. So, I picked it up and maxed it out. Her eyes got big with surprise and both said they had never seen anyone who could do that, to my considerable surprise. Few free divers would have any trouble. Further discussion and I discovered that most people my age(71) could barely manage 1500-2000. Talked to a nurse of long experience and she had only seen one person who could max out a spirometer, also a freediver. On another front, the X-ray techs that took my lung x-rays had to take two pics to get all the lungs and all commented on how long my lungs were. Asked the docs if this was genetic or training. They said, both(I’m tall, 6’1” ), but probably it was mostly training. I’ve been diving for 55 years and training for the last 14, which brings me to how all this affects you young divers.

Keeping your lung capacity up as you age is crazy good for you in all kinds of ways. Keep diving, guys and girls, its good for you.
 

otrebor

Active Member
Oct 13, 2011
29
3
43
Really interesting. Get well soon and freedive more than you can. Thanks for sharing
 

Sorandril

Member
Jun 13, 2020
111
16
23
40
Well, I did something stupid and ended up in the hospital for two days with 3 broken ribs, punctured lung, a pneumothorax and cracked scapula. The bad news is no diving for 8 weeks. The good news is, it will all heal and I learned a lot of interesting stuff.

The docs wanted me to do frequent deep breathing to ward off pneumonia and gave me a spirometer(a gadget which measures lung capacity that I had wanted) to help me keep track. I tried it and the first attempt was horrifying to me, only 2000ml. The tech said most pneumorthorax suffers can't do 1000. Intrigued, I started working on the spirometer. About the 4th try, I maxed it out, 4250 ml., well short of my normal capacity, but considering the situation, reasonable. Mentioned this to the two thoracic docs who came to examine me and it was clear that one flat did not believe me. So, I picked it up and maxed it out. Her eyes got big with surprise and both said they had never seen anyone who could do that, to my considerable surprise. Few free divers would have any trouble. Further discussion and I discovered that most people my age(71) could barely manage 1500-2000. Talked to a nurse of long experience and she had only seen one person who could max out a spirometer, also a freediver. On another front, the X-ray techs that took my lung x-rays had to take two pics to get all the lungs and all commented on how long my lungs were. Asked the docs if this was genetic or training. They said, both(I’m tall, 6’1” ), but probably it was mostly training. I’ve been diving for 55 years and training for the last 14, which brings me to how all this affects you young divers.

Keeping your lung capacity up as you age is crazy good for you in all kinds of ways. Keep diving, guys and girls, its good for you.
They say we can’t stop loss of vital capacity as we age.

I think they’re wrong
 
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GreatLaker

Member
Mar 9, 2019
7
6
18
Well, I did something stupid and ended up in the hospital for two days with 3 broken ribs, punctured lung, a pneumothorax and cracked scapula. The bad news is no diving for 8 weeks. The good news is, it will all heal and I learned a lot of interesting stuff.

The docs wanted me to do frequent deep breathing to ward off pneumonia and gave me a spirometer(a gadget which measures lung capacity that I had wanted) to help me keep track. I tried it and the first attempt was horrifying to me, only 2000ml. The tech said most pneumorthorax suffers can't do 1000. Intrigued, I started working on the spirometer. About the 4th try, I maxed it out, 4250 ml., well short of my normal capacity, but considering the situation, reasonable. Mentioned this to the two thoracic docs who came to examine me and it was clear that one flat did not believe me. So, I picked it up and maxed it out. Her eyes got big with surprise and both said they had never seen anyone who could do that, to my considerable surprise. Few free divers would have any trouble. Further discussion and I discovered that most people my age(71) could barely manage 1500-2000. Talked to a nurse of long experience and she had only seen one person who could max out a spirometer, also a freediver. On another front, the X-ray techs that took my lung x-rays had to take two pics to get all the lungs and all commented on how long my lungs were. Asked the docs if this was genetic or training. They said, both(I’m tall, 6’1” ), but probably it was mostly training. I’ve been diving for 55 years and training for the last 14, which brings me to how all this affects you young divers.

Keeping your lung capacity up as you age is crazy good for you in all kinds of ways. Keep diving, guys and girls, its good for you.
Interesting coincidence here... I'm turning 71 in a few weeks and have been scuba diving and swimming for years, also certified for freediving three years ago. Recently I had cataract surgery and during preparation the nurse anesthetist listened to my lungs and I obliged her with a few deep breaths. When done, she looked at me and said, you have a very large lung capacity; to which I replied, perhaps from yoga and freediving. She agreed.
 
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Sorandril

Member
Jun 13, 2020
111
16
23
40
Well i think weve explained all the senior citizens on this board....

well, that and our children are being taught its too dangerous to go underwater at all by religious zealots. I really dont expect much of a sense of adventure from people who were raised on a leash.
 

Hydro-Mike

Well-Known Member
Dec 11, 2010
38
4
48
Well, I did something stupid and ended up in the hospital for two days with 3 broken ribs, punctured lung, a pneumothorax and cracked scapula. The bad news is no diving for 8 weeks. The good news is, it will all heal and I learned a lot of interesting stuff.

The docs wanted me to do frequent deep breathing to ward off pneumonia and gave me a spirometer(a gadget which measures lung capacity that I had wanted) to help me keep track. I tried it and the first attempt was horrifying to me, only 2000ml. The tech said most pneumorthorax suffers can't do 1000. Intrigued, I started working on the spirometer. About the 4th try, I maxed it out, 4250 ml., well short of my normal capacity, but considering the situation, reasonable. Mentioned this to the two thoracic docs who came to examine me and it was clear that one flat did not believe me. So, I picked it up and maxed it out. Her eyes got big with surprise and both said they had never seen anyone who could do that, to my considerable surprise. Few free divers would have any trouble. Further discussion and I discovered that most people my age(71) could barely manage 1500-2000. Talked to a nurse of long experience and she had only seen one person who could max out a spirometer, also a freediver. On another front, the X-ray techs that took my lung x-rays had to take two pics to get all the lungs and all commented on how long my lungs were. Asked the docs if this was genetic or training. They said, both(I’m tall, 6’1” ), but probably it was mostly training. I’ve been diving for 55 years and training for the last 14, which brings me to how all this affects you young divers.

Keeping your lung capacity up as you age is crazy good for you in all kinds of ways. Keep diving, guys and girls, its good for you.
Good to see your still kicking. Your injury sounds like a good one (If it doesnt Kill you it makes you stronger). So you should be stronger , lol. I expect a PR this summer. All jokes aside glad to see your doing well. I have not been on the site in a few years and just swinging through to access.
 

J Campbell

Well-Known Member
Sep 17, 2001
595
179
148
66
Well, I did something stupid and ended up in the hospital for two days with 3 broken ribs, punctured lung, a pneumothorax and cracked scapula. The bad news is no diving for 8 weeks. The good news is, it will all heal and I learned a lot of interesting stuff.

The docs wanted me to do frequent deep breathing to ward off pneumonia and gave me a spirometer(a gadget which measures lung capacity that I had wanted) to help me keep track. I tried it and the first attempt was horrifying to me, only 2000ml. The tech said most pneumorthorax suffers can't do 1000. Intrigued, I started working on the spirometer. About the 4th try, I maxed it out, 4250 ml., well short of my normal capacity, but considering the situation, reasonable. Mentioned this to the two thoracic docs who came to examine me and it was clear that one flat did not believe me. So, I picked it up and maxed it out. Her eyes got big with surprise and both said they had never seen anyone who could do that, to my considerable surprise. Few free divers would have any trouble. Further discussion and I discovered that most people my age(71) could barely manage 1500-2000. Talked to a nurse of long experience and she had only seen one person who could max out a spirometer, also a freediver. On another front, the X-ray techs that took my lung x-rays had to take two pics to get all the lungs and all commented on how long my lungs were. Asked the docs if this was genetic or training. They said, both(I’m tall, 6’1” ), but probably it was mostly training. I’ve been diving for 55 years and training for the last 14, which brings me to how all this affects you young divers.

Keeping your lung capacity up as you age is crazy good for you in all kinds of ways. Keep diving, guys and girls, its good for you.
I had a similar experience. After surgery 3 years ago they gave me a spirometer and told me to try to move the needle to some value ( I forget what value). But I was able to nail the thing all the way to the top - and I was still groggy from the anesthesia. The nurse was impressed! And also, on another doctor visit for a chest xray the technician commented "my, you have really big lungs". So, yes freediving is very beneficial to lung health!
 
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cdavis

Well-Known Member
Jan 21, 2003
4,006
779
218
71
Feeling fine. Still a little bit stiff in the shoulder, but otherwise near 100 per cent.

I've been several times. Just short shallow dives to get a quick dinner. Planning a spring diving trip in the next couple of weeks, 90 ft dives, 200 ft vis, if we are lucky. We call the place the Magic Mud Puddle and I do love it.

Interesting aside, my lungs have shrunk a bit as I have been stretching very little.
 
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