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Freediving weights

Discussion in 'Beginner Freediving Q&A' started by DeepAbyss, Mar 21, 2018.

  1. DeepAbyss

    DeepAbyss New Member

    Local Time:
    6:52 PM
    Hello
    I would like to know if there is a calculator that can estimate the weight I need.
    I am aware that this is not accurate in the calculator and must be checked in water but nevertheless want to know an estimate.
    I have a 5.5 millimeter open-cell diving suit from Polosub.
    I weigh 67 pounds (147 pounds).
    Thanks
     
  2. SubSub

    SubSub Well-Known Member

    Local Time:
    5:52 PM
    The only calculator is the one you find in the sea, with all the gear on. All bodies have different buoyancy and the only way to really know is to try. It also has to to with at what depth you want to be neutral. You just have to try
     
  3. DeepAbyss

    DeepAbyss New Member

    Local Time:
    6:52 PM
    thx
    i know but i want a estimate (10 ,12 pounds) because i want to buy weight.
     
  4. vinnie

    vinnie Member

    Local Time:
    5:52 PM
    unless you do spearfishing or train in a swimming pool, imo it's better not to wear weight (safer). The less gear the better. If you still want to buy weight, probably 4 kg is more than enough. (I'm a beginner, but the best freedivers instructors I have do not wear weight but instead train their legs and are in shape)
     
  5. DeepAbyss

    DeepAbyss New Member

    Local Time:
    6:52 PM
    if i dive without suit i dont need weight but in the winter you must suit so i would like to buy weight.
     
  6. Mark Jeffery

    Mark Jeffery Well-Known Member

    Local Time:
    11:52 AM
    Buy 4 kg, if that's not enough go buy more.
     
  7. DeepAbyss

    DeepAbyss New Member

    Local Time:
    6:52 PM
    Thanks,
    Sure 4 kilos is enough for a 5.5 millimeter suit, and my weight?
    Of course I mean the estimate.
    Buy four weights of a kilo??
     
  8. vinnie

    vinnie Member

    Local Time:
    5:52 PM
    I'd buy 2 * 2kg, in lead with plastic coating. So if you need more you still have room on your belt.
     
  9. hteas

    hteas Well-Known Member

    Local Time:
    7:52 AM
    It really depends on body type. I'm using 24 lb with a new 7mm top and 5mm bottom and am pretty lightly built ('5' 11", 152 lb), but am diving shallow most of the time (>30 ft/10M)
     
  10. MAKO Spearguns

    MAKO Spearguns MAKO1 Supporter

    Local Time:
    11:52 AM
    The depth you will be diving is a critical factor. If you are hunting in 7 meters depth and you want to lay on the bottom, then you will want considerably more lead than if you are diving deep.

    It is important to get your weight dialed in correctly. 1 kg adjustments are somewhat large. It is nice to be able to add or subtract about a lb from your belt for fine tuning.

    I would think it makes sense to buy about 6 kgs which should be MORE than enough. Remember also that you can add or subtract a lb of lead by ,, for example, removing a 2 lb weight and adding a 3 lb weight. For this reason, if you can't get 1 lb weights, it may make sense to NOT buy all the same size weights.
     
    landshark sa likes this.
  11. DeepAbyss

    DeepAbyss New Member

    Local Time:
    6:52 PM
  12. Nathan Vinski

    Nathan Vinski Active Member

    Local Time:
    11:52 AM
    How did you come up that information. The safest way to dive is with proper weighting in order to conserve the most oxygen. 10m minimum neutral buoyancy or 1/3 of the target depth, regardless of if you are deep diving or spearing. Yes, slightly underweighted is safer than slightly overweighted.
    That being said, most instructors will be (slightly) over weighted to teach courses. It would be almost impossible to teach an intro course following students to 10m without weights and a shallow neutral males waching/ following a lot easier.
     
  13. stealth.

    stealth. New Member

    Local Time:
    11:52 PM
    As a rule of thumb, you need 1kg per mm of your wetsuit and an additional 2-3kg.

    I wear a 5mm open cell neoprene suit and dive with 7-8kg.

    Everyone’s body composition and body fat percentage is different. Keep in mind the amount of salt in the water and/or diving in freshwater will vary the amount you need completely.

    I lay on my back in the water and when I exhale completely like my face to submerge in water at the same rate as it would if I was in my “birthday” suit.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  14. stealth.

    stealth. New Member

    Local Time:
    11:52 PM
    I agree 100% I dropped my mask yesterday in water with about 3m depth and literally couldn’t dive down without my weight belt to get it no matter how hard I tried


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  15. vinnie

    vinnie Member

    Local Time:
    5:52 PM
    Oh sorry if I'm wrong or did not express my thoughts clearly. What I wanted to say is that imo it's better to hit the gym so you don't need to wear weight when you dive deeper than 10m. At least that's what I'm aiming for. I haven't freedived with a >3mm wetsuit though so maybe it's going to be hard if a 5mm is needed.
     
    stealth. likes this.