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How deep a breath hold?

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
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N

neshamah

CFD Group
Jun 2, 2003
535
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hi

Im not sure how breath holds/apnea could improve my bike racing though? Does anyone have any reasoning for this theory?
________

Hi Paul I think it will help anyone- runner- ciclistas ect in their last part of the race-because you are able to performe without the presense of oxigen- and when other got exausted you still have energy to finish the race - and and more "Resistencia
'" I think so
 
N

neshamah

CFD Group
Jun 2, 2003
535
37
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hi

Hmmm, why do i remembered article in newspaper about cyclists... That they're in need of oxygen, when going up-hill, or in the end of track?
_____________

Yes that was my point-- in my first post I talk about one question they made pipin in cuba about this - and Pipin say that this people will be the better freedivers -if they only use all their capacity they have already for freediving
 
P

pburgess

New Member
Oct 5, 2003
61
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cardio and freediving

Paul,

I'm not sure how your freediving will impact your cycling but there can be problems with intense cardio and freediving. Cardio is training your body to use oxygen. Apnea is the opposite.

You may need to do periods of intense conditioning [cycling etc.], have a period in which you maintain you strenth and fitness and slowly build up your apnea ability and finally a period of intense apnea.
 
tylerz

tylerz

Well-Known Member
Jun 19, 2002
733
114
133
Freediving should not impact your body in a negative way. Unless the addiction to freediving grows to the point that you forget to maintain your cycling training. ;)

As long as the cardio is being maintained as usual, any freediving will not hinder that level of cardio. Yes, freediving is based on apnea, which operates on a mix of aerobic and anaerobic metabolism, emphasis on anaerobic, throughout the dive. The training effect therefore will increase one's ability to perform under anaerobic conditions, yet this does not imply a change in one's aerobic abilities, or their cardiovascular system. Actually the opposite should occur, due to the things mentioned in my prior posts.

Cheers,

Tyler
 
N

neshamah

CFD Group
Jun 2, 2003
535
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aerobic and anaerobic

I found this in a book:

AEROBIC EXERCISE is any form of physical activity that can be performed without a break for at least 12 minutes. The muscles can keep working because they receive a constant supply of oxygen,while the energy they need is provided from the body's store of glucose (sugar),glycogen ( starch), and fat

The heart and the lungs have to work hardere to increase the amount of oxygen rich blood circulating around the body to the muscles. Because the muscles are not being pushed too hard,there is sufficient oxygen to meet their demands. As a result, the muscle cells tire slowly , and the exercise can be carried on for a long period.

Aerobic exercises are the best type of activity for increasing your general level of fitness, particularly the performance and efficiency of your heart,lungs ,and muscles, It is an essenctial part of any balanced physical fitness program



ANAEROBIC EXERCISE consist of short,sharp bursts of intense muslce activity,during withc the blood supply does not provide as much oxygen as the muscle need. The 110 yard ( 100 m ) sprint is one such activity.

Lacking oxygen,the muscles have to use other "anerocib" chemical processes to release the energy they require. These anaerobic reactions also produce lactic acid,which builds up rapidly in the muscles to cause fatigue , a heavy sensation, and even cramp. Anaerobic exercise cannot be continued for long ,and so will not improve the fitness of the heart and lungs..
______________


( anaerobic - it till not improve the fitness of the heart and lung??

is that truth?? now Im a litle confuse in this

( aerobic it is an essential part of any balanced physical fitness program ?)

it will not a balanced physical fitness to do both aerobic and anaerobic?? I find both important in my training

I do not know what the editor of this book is talking about it -


my other question - wich sport need more the anaerobic exercies than other ?
 
tylerz

tylerz

Well-Known Member
Jun 19, 2002
733
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( anaerobic - it till not improve the fitness of the heart and lung??

Exactly. It does not have anything to do with the heart or the lung. They are not used towards anaerobic metabolism, but of course continue to operate on whatever % of aerobic metabolism still exists.


( aerobic it is an essential part of any balanced physical fitness program ?)

Both are essential for a balanced phsyical fitness. Specific to anaerobic I found this quote:

It creates muscle tissue through which your heart can pump blood with minimum effort. It also creates more insulin receptor sites and changes the insulin/glucagon/eicosanoid hormone balance in a very positive way. A usual effect is to lower blood pressure, even if your blood pressure is only in the high normal range.

As well muscle strength increases generally as a product of anaerobic activities, which is essential for stabilizing joints and absorbing shock, being extremely important as we age.

my other question - wich sport need more the anaerobic exercies than other ?

Weight-lifting, sprinting, etc... sports that require bursts of energy or maximum muscle contracting.
 
paul oz

paul oz

New Member
Oct 10, 2004
5
0
0
Its not that cut and dried tho.
There isnt always a sudden switch or definition between aerobic and anerobic.
My aerobic threshhold is about 189bpm, yet i can race at over 193 bpm for 20 minutes, and 191bpm for an hour.
As the pace increases, more anerobic short twitch muscle fibres are brought into play in addition to the aerobic ones - which causes lactic acid to be produced (by product of anerobic muscle contraction).
In most cases the absolute limiting factor in sports such as bike racing, long distance running etc is the ability for the muscles to tolerate in this atmosphere, and of the athletes pain threashold in coping with it in training to increase this tolerance.
The pulse graphs for my best races rise at about 3 degrees through the event, leveling out from the start at 189bpm, and 195 ish at the finish.
My legs are significantly bigger at the finish due to swelling from lactate!

From what i understand, although i could well be wrong, its not the body as a whole that needs to tolerate lactic acid (ie not enough oxygen), but the specific muscles being used - in exactly the same movement???
But hey, i could try riding my indoor trainer holding my breath - now that would be an interesting experiment!The more i think about that - the more sense it makes? My muscles are going to go straight into producing lactate acid without me going very hard at all arent they???

By the way - i broke the 2 minute barrier today! Just got bored at work and started typing emails at the same time to distract myself!
Still finding it hard holding a full lung full because of the pressure from my lungs. I have to hold my nose, and my ears pop!!??
 
Last edited:
tylerz

tylerz

Well-Known Member
Jun 19, 2002
733
114
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its not the body as a whole that needs to tolerate lactic acid (ie not enough oxygen), but the specific muscles being used - in exactly the same movement???
Basically, but the removal of lactic acid is essential to alkalinize the blood and muscles, thereby allowing the muscles to continue the process of anaerobic metabolism.

My muscles are going to go straight into producing lactate acid without me going very hard at all arent they???
Exactly, if you can overcome the CO2 induced urge to breathe, which is doubtful until you practice a bit. Work on CO2 tolerance first or you will just stress yourself out.
 
C

cdavis

Well-Known Member
Jan 21, 2003
4,065
802
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Paul,

Here is a not very scientific observation that suggests freediving improves what you are looking for. Note, I'm no athelete.

I swim about 2 days a week for fitness and some apnea training. My diving is mostly confined to 2 or 3 trips of about 5 days in the summer. Intense freediving every day. I see two distinct effects of the diving trips, particularly the longer ones. First , I need more weight by the end of a trip, ie my lungs hold more air. The difference is about a liter if I haven't been training at all, a substantial increase. Second, when I get back from a trip, I have a much harder time working hard enough to get breathless during the pool workout, even if I push pretty hard. For whatever reason, my o2 exchange capacity (or maybe co2 tolerence?) has increased to the point that my muscular exertion can't exceed my "lung capacity". This remains true whether I train hard before a trip or not. The effect remains very noticable for about a month, again not affected by how hard I train.

Good luck experimenting.

Connor
 
Mr. X

Mr. X

Forum Mentor
Staff member
Forum Mentor
Jul 14, 2005
8,225
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Re: Hi oz

Freediver81 said:
when holding your breath for static apnea you should fill 70-80% of your lungs!

while freediving you should fill 100% of your lungs!

:hmm Interesting. Any suggestion for spearfishing (bearing in mind that blacking out at sea is considered bad form...deadly even)?
 
Mr. X

Mr. X

Forum Mentor
Staff member
Forum Mentor
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Almostafish said:
Try a course!
If you guarantee that I will catch my body weight in prime sea bass while on the course, I will be there in a flash! ;)
 
Almostafish

Almostafish

AKA Bryn
Apr 23, 2004
720
241
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Hmmm.... We can probably do it in scallops/oysters/flatfish/mullet/squid/lobster/pollock/bream combined... But I think you would be hard pressed to land that much Prime Bass in a month of UK hunting!!

Keeps us in mind if you want to know more. B
 
Mr. X

Mr. X

Forum Mentor
Staff member
Forum Mentor
Jul 14, 2005
8,225
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Almostafish said:
Hmmm.... We can probably do it in scallops/oysters/flatfish/mullet/squid/lobster/pollock/bream combined... But I think you would be hard pressed to land that much Prime Bass in a month of UK hunting!!

Keeps us in mind if you want to know more. B

240lb of fresh seafood Mmmmmmmmmmm :p I better get a BIG freezer box & stop loosing weight then :). Will be in touch.
[Same deal for my big brother? Better get the trawler out. :D ]
 
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