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How many dives safelly ?

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
It can take a long time to get an up-to-date response or contact with relevant users.

noa

Well-Known Member
Oct 17, 2003
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How many shallow (15-20 meters depth) dives can a medium level freediver, perform in a 6 to 8 hour time span while remainig safe. Is there a rough number it's advisable not to exceed in a certain time span. Also how important is water temperature in the whole equasion, does being slightly cold reduce the number of dives to remain safe ?
Delphicly,
Noa
 

Alison

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Mar 6, 2004
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Now this is where a computer comes into its own!! Well not got any tables here with me at the mo but as I remember one could spend one hour at 20 metres without decompression and many hours at 10M so at a guess over 6 - 8 hours you could probably still do your one hour bottom time so number of dives would depend on how long you stay at the bottom :D
 

noa

Well-Known Member
Oct 17, 2003
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Is this scuba or freediving you're talking about ? I'm refering to freediving as i'm sure you've understood.
Delphicly,
Noa
 

Adrian

Deeper Blue Beachcomber
Supporter
Nov 23, 2002
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Noa,
Alison was refering to the accumulated bottom time after 6-8 hours of freediving. There was a thread or a section of a thread on this sometime back, but I don't remember what it was called.

Recovery time should always be at least double bottom time, that plays an important role in safety especially during long series of dives.

Do a search on decompression.

Adrian
 

Alison

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Mar 6, 2004
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Yes freediving, its reasonably easy to do 10 dives per hour to 20M with a botom time of 2 minutes each, that means in 3 hours yours into decomp and in 6 - 8 your pushing being bent, OK so your recovery time counts as decomp time but how sure are we??
From your second question I think your asking how many dives can we do without exhausting ourselves? Well only you can answer that if thats what your asking.
The Alison view is: its better to give up early and come back tomorrow. A fool and his life are soon parted.

Dont take that last comment personaly anyone please, its just an Alisonism but a view I belive in deeply and I would rather you came back tomorrow and flamed me, than read your obituary.
 

noa

Well-Known Member
Oct 17, 2003
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I totaly agree with what you say Alison, it's all too true. Thanks a lot for that info. When you reffer to tables and a computer, are there established norms for freediving ?
Delphicly,
Noa
 

Alison

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Mar 6, 2004
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Cant answer that with any truth Noa, I guess we have to be on the safe side sometimes, at a guess a computer would be close to the mark but as I said if you only dive to 20M then our surface time should be sufficient decomp time but for me its best to be safe.
Im supprised there hasnt been more input into this thread, its fundemental to the sport of freediving and spearfishing and Im sure theres more to add to my drunken guesses :eek:
Anyway I dont proffess to be 100% right, just making my best guess but its not to far from the truth.
Enjoy your dives no matter what mate :)
 

Adrian

Deeper Blue Beachcomber
Supporter
Nov 23, 2002
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I found the thread I referred to earlier:
http://forums.deeperblue.net/showth...rpage=15&highlight=decompression&pagenumber=1

This is all about freediving and decompression so go through all the posts, especially the question Guss asks and the replies he gets. Eric Fattah also posts a rough guideline for what he uses to avoid decompression.

There are some freediving decompression tables I could scan, but they are not so good image quality. I'll let you know when I have scanned them and can email tham to you or I'll post them here if the file size is managable.

Adrian
 
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DeepThought

Freediving Sloth
Sep 8, 2002
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Apnea decompression tables.

Adrian, I'de be very thankful if you could post them on DB, or include me in your mail.
I've googled for them before and brought nothing...
 

noa

Well-Known Member
Oct 17, 2003
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Thanks for that boys, keep me posted...
Delphicly,
Noa
 

Adrian

Deeper Blue Beachcomber
Supporter
Nov 23, 2002
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I've written to the author hoping he has a digitalized copy of the whole article that I can post here.

Adrian
 

Alison

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Mar 6, 2004
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The thing to remember is: just because we freedive doesnt mean that the partial pressure in our lungs is any less, the volume at depthwill be but not the partial presure. Its the absorbtion of N2 at higher partial pressure/given time that will cause DCS not the volume we absorb at atmospheric pressure! Standard air scuba tables will apply! How you apply them is a matter of some debate, but freedivers are not exempt!

We are vunerable!!!
 
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