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Hyperventilation effects in Static

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bluelq

New Member
Apr 9, 2002
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I have now begun training, or at least practicing my apneas more often. Since I have a heavy studying schedule I am limiting myself to static apnea and getting back in shape. Yesterday I decided to evaluate my current times. I was happy to see that after a year of absence I had been able in a few weeks to work up to a 3 minute static time. Which is my so far all time best. I also remember that I had never used hyperventilation and decided to give it a try. I am firmly against the use of hyperventilation in diving since we have so many risks already there is no need to up the odds. But I had never tried it in static, and to my surprise I managed to reach 4:15 (about 20 convulsions, first one would hit around 3:00). This was like reaching a dream of breaking the 4 minutes barriers, something only thought of in my imagination. I used to smoke as well so reaching such a time was something I thought I would never be able to do, especially only after a couple of years of quitting.

I was in for a surprise though.

I hyperventilated three to five times for each breath, measuring the effects and so on. However, a unexpected side effect occurred. About 5 seconds in each attempt I got terribly dizzy, not exactly dizzy but a feeling like a was being electrocuted, huge buzz in other words. To be specific on the 5 breath hyper.. the buzz spell was strong that if someone was in front of me I doubt I would be able to respond to them. Among other things I would forget the time I would begin the apnea, thus the reason for the three consecutive apneas. All had plenty of time in between, yet all resulted to some degree of this effect. The effects would only last about 20-30 seconds as far as I can tell. After which I would feel totally normal. The only other feeling would be a peculiar feel of temperature variance in my chest, as if in some parts the inhaled air were colder. Towards the end of the apnea the temperature variance would be felt in airway passage.

I tried to understand why this happened, so I traced one possibility to a breathing preparation technique in which you inhale fully but exhale somewhat slowly. It is supposed to increase your times about 10-15%, and among other things help you relax. So I thought that could be the reason, yet I tried it with and without the above preparation with mixed effects, once it occurred while another time it didn’t.

So I am left somewhat wondering why this would happen. The only other reason I could thiÐÞ
sessionèÞ
vK
ß
e5
, maybe I needed short ones. I am not sure and to be honest I wont be using the technique since as far as I know it doesn’t increase your tolerance, it just increases time. Which is really something I would rather do only if needed (competition, heavy training to see limits and so on). One thing I got afraid of is passing out and without a buddy, (bed apnea) I got scared it could be dangerous. If anyone has any helpful info, advice or answers I would love to hear them.

Thanks in Advance,
Dizzy Blue
 

amr

New Member
Jul 14, 2001
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I think this a pretty common observation -- If you hyperventilate too much and too quickly, you get dizzy for a while and can even black out. Too-low CO2 level (caused by the hyperventilation) may be the cause.

Best bet is to look at past posts on this board for optimal breath-up techniques for dry static apnea. Usually these involve slow deep abdominal breaths spread out over a fair while, but not always -- rapid shallow abdominal breaths have been advocated at least once (and they work, too).

Disclaimer: I am no great apnea guru and have never made it to 8 minutes (or even 7 minutes). Perhaps someone else can offer more specific advice.
 
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Bill

Baron of Breathold
Oct 17, 2001
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dry static

> buzz spell was strong that if someone was in front of me I doubt I would be able to respond to them.<

I did something similar at the start of a class and made a complete fool of myself. I remembered nothing of it except; the teacher talking to me and classmates looking at me. The last time I hyper-ventilated, I fell off the chair at about 30 seconds. Someone said it has to do with blood pressure. Now my ventilation is 3 seconds in to 75%, pause, 3 seconds exhale against pursed lips, 2 seconds relaxed exhale and pause. A few years of dry static, with one pool and one ocean workout per week lets me do a session of;

2 minute vent, 2 minute static, 3/3, 4/4, 5/5, 6/6
no purge, no pack, no hyper, relax is most important

Contractions are interesting too. On the 6, my first comes at about 2 1/2, by 4 minutes they are continuous.

Aloha
Bill
 
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DSV

New Member
Jan 11, 2002
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That Ole Buzz Feelings

I can vouch for Bill, I witness it. He actually started mumbling nonsence. It was quite entertaining.:D

Now about the buzz. Hyperventilation is very bad for static. You are NOT increasing your O2 level and you are also lowering your CO2 levels. You have a very good chance of rolling over in the water or on land and having a BO without any warning. You need to elevate you O2 levels first then do what is called purges. (deep but fast ventilation, NOT fast shallow ventilations) Kirk Krack has stollen my technique ;) but has extended his prep time. On my final attempt I breathe for 7 min, the last 1 min of that is purging. I normally get that buzz feeling for the first 20 to 30 sec into the static, but my O2 levels are high from the 6 mins of breathing prior. This is a technique that you need to work up to, 1 min of purging is a lot. So be careful if you try it. I too am no guru, but this technique has gotten me past the 6:30 mark.


DSV
 

bluelq

New Member
Apr 9, 2002
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A Minute !!!!!!!

I did 5 purges and felt like I was fading from life.. You also said that you do 6 minutes of breathing preparation, what does that entail, slow deep breaths, very slow exhales?

I am only asking out of curiosity as I feel that if I am to continue this type of training (at least including hyperventilation) a seminar or class will benefit me much.

Thanks for the info..
 

Walrus

Oz freediver
Oct 3, 2001
693
77
0
Tingly sensation

Hi all,

The last couple of times I've practised statics I've got that tingly feeling in my arms & legs, but was using slow deep breathing ?
Isn't that a sympton of Hyperventilation ?

Was in my wetsuit foating on my back breathing through my mouth, neck tilted back, and deep breathed for about 4 minutes or so. After that felt the tingles in my hands & arms, took a couple of quick breaths and did a static. Now I didn't get dizzy at any stage, but I felt really good, maybe a bit too good. Didn't notice contractions until maybe the 5 minute mark, came up just after 6 because I'd never done it before, still felt good though.


Maybe I have to slow my breathing down even more, or perhaps not breath up so long ?

Anyone had a similar experience ?

Not too keen on trying the purge breaths, anything that takes effort before a static (including packing) really throws me off and reduces my times. I have to really stay relaxed the whole time.....


Thanks,
Walter
 

Erik

Well-Known Member
Jan 21, 2001
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Walter, that sensation is what you want before big breath hold. It means you are as saturated with O2 as you can be, and you are "ready". If you ventilate a little more, and feel that you are over the edge, you can tense a muscle a few times ( like a fist ffor example) to burn a litle O2 and take the edge off. However, this is the state you should be experimenting with if you want to improve breath holds.
And congrats on the awesome PB!
Cheers,
Erik Y.
 

Bill

Baron of Breathold
Oct 17, 2001
1,805
332
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2nd post??

please excuse me if this comes out double.

Walter

Nice static. The thinking is good and it is paying off. If there is no reason to wait, the first 'tingles' is a good time to start for me. If you have to delay or do a longer work-up, shallower breathing works because it allows me to relax more.

Aloha
Bill
 

DSV

New Member
Jan 11, 2002
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The Tingles

Bluelq,


The first 6 mins of my breathe up are slow in and slow out. Then comes the min of purging. Be careful trying this as you said you may feel strange and there is the possibilty of BO. Yes you should get some formal training.

Walrus,

Hyperventilation as defined by Terry Maas is any type of ventilation other than normal breathing. Kirk and Brett define it as a minimum breathing rate of 25 breaths per minute. Pipin defines it as when you exceed the appropriate ventilation level creating a dramatic reduction of CO2 in the blood.

So what you felt was what Erik said, you were saturated with O2 and ready to go, but you had higher levels of CO2 because you were not moving. That's were the pumping of the fist comes into play. Just by that pumping you create a balance of CO2 and O2 and the tingle will go away. But you should start you static then.

Way to go on your PB!rofl

DSV
 

Walrus

Oz freediver
Oct 3, 2001
693
77
0
Thanks a lot for the advice.

I was a bit woried because I hadn't felt the tingles before, and thought the contractions came very late, and very mild. So Erik you said this is because my O2 levels were as high as they get, this is a good thing, much better then trying to lower CO2.
Do you try and do the same for a Constant Ballast Dive ?

Bill I might try what you said and start my static when I first start feeling the tingles. I'll expirement with slower or shallower breathing. From what I've read 4 or 5 minutes is a reasonable breath up time for a final static.
I'll try the fist thing (sound a bit rude ?)

Erik I think I still have a long way to go before I can get to a 7 minute static like you !
I'll have to try and learn to do dry statics, I've never had much luck because I've always done statics underwater, and can't get the same relaxed feeling on land. (Think my best was 3 minutes ?)

Thanks again, good to know I'm on the right track.
Walter
 
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