lactic acid/¿low o2 warning? | DeeperBlue.com Forums
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lactic acid/¿low o2 warning?

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
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sebastian

New Member
Oct 9, 2001
29
1
0
46
Hi every body,
I´ve been practicing bh walking, and from 1:20 minutes onwards I start feeling my legs tired, and by the time I reach 2:00 (my limit) I feel like I´m ending a marathon.
Acording to what I have read this is because of lactic acid in my legs due to anaerobic metabolism.

Now, if this is true, couldnt you use that as an indication that you are low on o2, and inmediatly end your dive?

regards,
Sebastian
 

cjborgert

Well-Known Member
Jul 29, 2001
401
30
118
Biomarkers

Sebastian,

I think it would be very useful to have a "biomarker" to tell you when to end your dive. Leg squeeze (my term for that feeling when you contract muscles low on O2 / high on lactate) would certainly be an indication you would notice. However, in my experience - which is not nearly as extensive as some others on this forum - by the time I feel leg squeeze, I may be too close to my limit to surface safely.

I've never blacked out after feeling leg squeeze (or any other time), but I've felt pretty funny on the surface after feeling leg squeeze at about 10 meters - saw stars, felt some trembling in my arm and tingling in my face - so I hesitate to rely on it as an indicator of when to head for the surface.

This could be very individual, and perhaps I don't feel the squeeze as early as others, but for me, I think of leg squeeze as an indication to give the 'spread fingers' ("I'm in trouble") signal to my buddy.
 

sebastian

New Member
Oct 9, 2001
29
1
0
46
Hi CJB,

Thanks for the reply.

I was thinking more of not waiting to feel "leg squeeze" to end the dive, but should you feel it, droping your belt right away and going to the surface eforthless so as to save your short o2 supply for your brain. Kind of safety procedure.
I´ve never felt it in the water, only walking.

I read the EFatah profile, and his record, many months ago, and didnt understood his hipothermic-anaerobic method. Now I think of it, and it seems that with cold/vasoconstriction and maybe some pneumatical/mecanical device, he purposely leave his legs (maybe arms too) without o2, runing on anaerobic metabolism. So his 02 supply is reserved for the core/head of his body.
That will really hurt!!!


Regards,
Sebastian
 

cjborgert

Well-Known Member
Jul 29, 2001
401
30
118
———————————————————————————————————————
I was thinking more of not waiting to feel "leg squeeze" to end the dive, but should you feel it, droping your belt right away and going to the surface eforthless so as to save your short o2 supply for your brain. Kind of safety procedure.
————————————————————————————————————————

Makes sense to me. Based on my experience, that is what I'll do next time, just to be on the safe side.
 
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