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Need help hacking a fill adaptor for pneumatic Technisub speargun.

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
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atlanticaction

Active Member
Oct 13, 2011
15
0
36
I have a Technisub Ranger without a pump. I would like to rig a Schrader valve stem (bicycle) to a threaded fitting to charge the gun from a bike pump or compressor. I once did this with a Mares. Does any one have information on the type of thread used on a Technisub charging port, or other ideas on how to fill this gun DIY?
 

popgun pete

Well-Known Member
Jul 30, 2008
4,286
1,197
353
This is the hand pump for the "Ranger" and a number of the Technisub pneumatic guns used it. The item at the far left is a protective cover for the nose of the pump and at the right is the rear bulkhead that screws onto the hand pump barrel and traps the pumping piston and pump rod inside the pump. Unlike most hand pumps the Technisub pump has a conical seal that pushes air in on the pumping stroke and collapses on the pull back stroke sucking air in around the hole that the pump rod slides through, hence these hand pumps don't have any breather holes in the pump body. However any replacement pump can just work in the usual way as this was Technisub just being different to set their hand pumps apart.

The simplest way to do it would be to have an adaptor machined that screws onto a Mares pump and then screws into the Technisub inlet port. This can be made of aluminium.

These "Ranger" guns were not that popular as they only have a small tank surrounded by a black molding that makes the gun look like it has a bigger tank which in most other guns is 40 mm in diameter, whereas the "Ranger" tank is only 34 mm in diameter. I have never seen one, but I have heard of a "Scout" version of the gun which is minus that black shroud and makes the gun more manoeuvrable with a slimmer barrel profile.
Technisub handpump for Ranger.jpg
 

popgun pete

Well-Known Member
Jul 30, 2008
4,286
1,197
353
This is a Technisub "Jaguar" hand pump, the near identical pump for the "Ranger" and "Grinta" models was black instead of the gold seen here. The 15 mm diameter shoulder is for sealing on the "O" ring in the rear of the gun's inlet valve body. As these guns have a big inlet valve stem the 7 mm diameter hole in the face of the hand pump is to allow this stem to poke through it. These Technisub guns had an unusual rear valve which can also be seen in the “Grinta”.
Technisub pump (Jaguar) R.jpg

Grinta 3.jpg

The inlet valve is circled in red, the seal is the "O" ring sitting on the alloy washer alongside the stem with a broad base and a fat rounded head top.
Technisub Ranger exploded parts diagram.jpg
 
Last edited:

atlanticaction

Active Member
Oct 13, 2011
15
0
36
Thanks, this is great info. I am thinking about all the old parts I have sold or given away in the past, could have had this done in a minute!
Anyone have an old Jaguar pump (maybe even one of mine??)
 
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