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PADI-type Freediving Education

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
It can take a long time to get an up-to-date response or contact with relevant users.

Is there a need to POSITION freediving as recreational diving open to the masses

  • Yes

    Votes: 34 51.5%
  • No

    Votes: 32 48.5%

  • Total voters
    66
penguinator

penguinator

Well-Known Member
Sep 28, 2006
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35
68
My god I hope this wonderfull pasttime does not end up like PADI...

I really disagree with PADI, they act like they are the authority on all SCUBA diving, yet they are still just a commercial organisation.

Often they teach the scientifically proven WRONG thing to do, and try and press teaching that incorrect skill because they say so.

Just a couple of small examples;

They teach in their RESCUE DIVER course that vinegar is what you put on blue-bottle stings..... when any surfer/diver/anyone with half a brain can tell you that all vinegar does is trigger un-fired stinging barbs in the tentacles.

They also teach that when rescusitating a diver while swimming to a boat, if the boat is more than 10 minutes away, you cease all rescue-breaths and swim to the boat as fast as you can...... now I dont know if its just obvious to people who have done CPR courses, but what happens after 10 minutes of starving the brain of oxygen? Thats correct..... death.



Whew.... glad I got that out of my system :t
 
island_sands

island_sands

Erection Supervisor ;)
Supporter
Jan 19, 2001
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penguinator said:
My god I hope this wonderfull pasttime does not end up like PADI...

I really disagree with PADI, they act like they are the authority on all SCUBA diving, yet they are still just a commercial organisation.

Often they teach the scientifically proven WRONG thing to do, and try and press teaching that incorrect skill because they say so.

Just a couple of small examples;

They teach in their RESCUE DIVER course that vinegar is what you put on blue-bottle stings..... when any surfer/diver/anyone with half a brain can tell you that all vinegar does is trigger un-fired stinging barbs in the tentacles.

They also teach that when rescusitating a diver while swimming to a boat, if the boat is more than 10 minutes away, you cease all rescue-breaths and swim to the boat as fast as you can...... now I dont know if its just obvious to people who have done CPR courses, but what happens after 10 minutes of starving the brain of oxygen? Thats correct..... death.



Whew.... glad I got that out of my system :t

That's interesting penguinator. I am a PADI instructor and what they teach is no different to other training agencies, the basics are all the same.

btw, putting vinegar on jellyfish tentacles was always the done thing where i i went to school on the South African coast. We used to get bluebottles all the time and kids were always getting stung. Lifeguards always treated stings with white vinegar. Its actually FRESH WATER that triggers unfired barbs.
http://www.emedicinehealth.com/wilderness_jellyfish_sting/page3_em.htm
http://www.swordfishingcentral.com/jellyfish-sting.html
http://www.diversalertnetwork.org/medical/articles/article.asp?articleid=10

Regarding the rescue, where did you get that from? We teach to continue rescue breaths, on the surface, while swimming with the injured diver, until you reach the shore or boat.

Remember, the goal is always to stay safe yourself first.

(Read the following from the PADI instructor manual, just to clarify) :)
Establish responsiveness.
• Shake the diver. Turn a face down diver who does not respond
face up.
3. Call for help as soon as possible if the diver does not respond, or if
it’s clear help’s needed.
4. Establish an airway if the diver is unresponsive. In
the water this calls for special techniques that you’ll
learn and practice later.
5. Check for breathing. If the diver is not breathing,
start rescue breaths. In the water this calls for special
techniques that you’ll learn and practice later.
6. Check for circulation (heartbeat). If the diver has no
heartbeat, begin CPR. However, it’s difficult to determine
heartbeat in the water, so this step differs from primary care
when you’re out of the water.
• You must get the diver out of the water onto a hard surface to
perform CPR.
• Because it’s difficult to determine heartbeat in the water, the protocol
is that you don’t try until out of the water. If the victim isn’t
breathing, you will begin rescue breaths and tow the victim to
boat or shore as quickly as possible to further the assessment,
including checking for circulation, and begin CPR if necessary.
(More about these procedures later in the course.)
7. Check for bleeding – if the diver is breathing and has a heartbeat,
determine if there is any serious bleeding that must be controlled.
• In dive contexts, a responsive victim will usually
know if and where there’s a substantial injury
(bite, cut, etc.); check these for serious bleeding.
• Direct pressure will work in the water. It may be
difficult or impossible to use pressure points
through an exposure suit. Elevation of an arm
may be effective for short periods.
• For bleeding from the leg, it may be most effective
for the victim (if responsive) to apply pressure (if possible) while
you tow.
• The body’s clotting mechanism may be slowed by water, so getting
the victim out of the water is a priority.
8. Manage shock – the previous steps are part of shock management.
Out of the water, shock management continues as you learned in
the EFR course.
c. Out of the water, continue rescue breathing, CPR and/or first aid and
monitor the patient’s ABCD’S until a medical professional
takes over.

also
1. Managing an Unresponsive Diver at the Surface
What are the procedures to follow when rescuing an unresponsive
diver at the surface?
a. Approach an apparently unresponsive diver by calling
out, splashing, etc. to get attention. Make contact and
confirm that the diver is unresponsive.
b. Turn a face down diver face up. One way to do this is
from above the unresponsive diver’s head. Cross your
arms with your stronger arm on top, grasp his wrists
and then uncross your arms. This will spin the diver
over.
c. Establish buoyancy for you and the victim, and call for
help.
d. Remove the victim’s mask and regulator, open the airway
and check for breathing.
1. You may need to remove your mask, too, depending
on the mask and the method you use for rescue
breathing.
2. Look, listen and feel for breathing for 10 seconds.
3. In case of a suspected back or neck injury, check
breathing before extending the unresponsive diver’s
neck. This would be relatively rare in diving, but could be possible if the diver fell, struck something during an entry
or were thrown by a wave. If suspecting back injury and there is
no breathing, open the diver’s airway with the chin lift only
(sometimes called “jaw thrust”) technique. Tip the head to extend
the neck only if nothing else works to restore the airway.
e. If the victim is breathing, hold the airway open and
protect it from splashes/water while towing to safety.
1. Be cautious to avoid turning the diver or pushing the diver’s face
underwater.
2. Continue to monitor for breathing.
f. If you establish that the diver isn’t breathing, give two slow full rescue
breaths.
1. In the water it can be difficult to determine if a diver with very
weak breathing is actually breathing.
2. Giving rescue breaths to a diver breathing that weakly is unlikely
to cause further harm.
3. Giving rescue breaths to a diver in respiratory arrest, on the other
hand, may revive the victim shortly, such as in near drowning
cases.
g. Give rescue breaths and evaluate how long it will take
to get to safety (boat or shore) .
1. If it appears you are less than five minutes from safety,
tow the diver to safety while continuing to provide
rescue breaths. Get the diver out of the water, continue
rescue breaths and perform a heart check. Begin
CPR if necessary according to your CPR/first aid
training.
2. If it appears you are more than five minutes from safety, ventilate
for one more minute while checking for movement or other reaction
to the ventilations. If present, continue providing rescue
breaths while towing to safety.
3. If there is no movement or reaction to the rescue
breaths, the diver is probably in cardiac arrest.
Discontinue rescue breaths and tow the victim to
safety as quickly as possible, exit the water, perform
a heart check and begin CPR/resume rescue breathing
as you learned in your CPR/first aid training.
h. You need to evaluate the environmental conditions, the
victim’s condition, your condition and other factors. If
attempting to give rescue breaths in the water would present additional
hazard to you or the victim, you may need to rapidly tow the
diver to a safe area (in the water, or on a boat or shore) to begin.

make sense?
 
Last edited:
penguinator

penguinator

Well-Known Member
Sep 28, 2006
234
35
68
Thats really weird...... what book are you reading from?

I was just reading my Rescue Diver book and it goes on about the 10 minute thing. I might be missreading.

Also, you would treat some jellyfish stings with vinegar but not blue bottles. The IDEAL method of treating bluebottle stings is washing the tentacles of with salt water, and then apply hot, fresh water on the afflicted area. But normally its hard to get hot water on it immediately rofl
 
island_sands

island_sands

Erection Supervisor ;)
Supporter
Jan 19, 2001
7,998
1,281
418
penguinator said:
Thats really weird...... what book are you reading from?

I was just reading my Rescue Diver book and it goes on about the 10 minute thing. I might be missreading.

Also, you would treat some jellyfish stings with vinegar but not blue bottles. The IDEAL method of treating bluebottle stings is washing the tentacles of with salt water, and then apply hot, fresh water on the afflicted area. But normally its hard to get hot water on it immediately rofl

which rescue diver book is it, and can you copy me the text here? the above is from my 2006 instructor manual.

bluebottle is still a jellyfish, and i agree about the hot water but if not, vinegar, meat tenderiser, or baking soda (??) hehehehe is good.

Ask the Aussies as well... use antipodean coastlings suffered many a bluebottle wrap around the legs in our youth
(and that was a loooooooooooong time ago) :D
 
island_sands

island_sands

Erection Supervisor ;)
Supporter
Jan 19, 2001
7,998
1,281
418
land shark said:
do my eyes decieve me!!(blink blink)

rofl rofl

Watch out there young man!!! :naughty
 
penguinator

penguinator

Well-Known Member
Sep 28, 2006
234
35
68
I will have to get back to you on that one! Ill try find it in the text.

I remember it clearly because I when I was sitting the test I got the questions wrong, and explained why, and the examiner agreed that it was total *******s and gave me the marks (49/50 :D)


EDIT: wow I cant believe that word is sensored! Oh well I guess its primarily a UK website rofl
 
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