• Welcome to the DeeperBlue.com Forums, the largest online community dedicated to Freediving, Scuba Diving and Spearfishing. To gain full access to the DeeperBlue.com Forums you must register for a free account. As a registered member you will be able to:

    • Join over 44,280+ fellow diving enthusiasts from around the world on this forum
    • Participate in and browse from over 516,210+ posts.
    • Communicate privately with other divers from around the world.
    • Post your own photos or view from 7,441+ user submitted images.
    • All this and much more...

    You can gain access to all this absolutely free when you register for an account, so sign up today!

Puttin On an Apnea suit

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
It can take a long time to get an up-to-date response or contact with relevant users.
ramstam

ramstam

New Member
May 9, 2003
227
12
0
After my wetsuit is dry, I spray silicone made for scuba gear
inside of it. That way when I get ready to dive it's already lubed
up and ready to go.
 
rcerdena

rcerdena

New Member
Oct 24, 2003
223
23
0
50
Jimbodiver:
by ''the bag'' I mean that when you have the jacket on, fold it up 1/3 or 1/2 all around your chest/back, this creates a ''pocket'' (like the cangooros). Fill this pocket with water (back and front). Spread whater on the shoulders and elbows. After this you are ready! The rest is just a trick to take it off. I use the same proccedure to take the vest off too.
This applies to all kind of jackets: smooth skin or lycra in the exterior. The more water you have in the bag, the easier it is to take the jacket off.

I hope the explanation is a bit more clear now ;)

Cheers,

Roberto
 
jimbodiver

jimbodiver

Deeper Blue Enthusiast
Oct 12, 2004
51
0
0
Roberto -- yes, it is. That's the same as the explanation on one of the wetsuit websites...just didn't recognize at first. I'll try that, as I really would prefer not tugging on the beaver tail, even for only that initial moment.
 
Fondueset

Fondueset

Carp Whisperer
Jul 27, 2004
4,604
734
203
17
Thanks to Veronika and more lube - victory at last. During the course some small scrape/tears developed around the neck and chin of the hood - I think I did not have enough lube early on and my chin sort of scraped it (esliossub says this is normal wear :)). It looks like the neoprene in this suit is very disinclined to tear - and stretching these quite forcefully does not make them expand - opinions advice welcome - i think with enough lube there will be no more problems.

I used Veronika's method and with gobs of conditioner it was quite easy!

Happy Xmas everyone - here I am - victorious in the snow!

http://webpages.charter.net/cmorey/pics/HappyWetsuitman.jpg
 
Last edited:
flyboy748

flyboy748

Well-Known Member
Sep 18, 2003
415
58
118
Cheers dude!

I use conditioner still very diluted with water. However I'm starting to develop the allergy that Roberto, Sam and others are having trouble with if I use the conditioner. I've tried the water thing, even with direct instruction from Roberto I failed to make it work... however maybe I just need more practice!

I was all gung ho for a New Year's day dive last year... and this year not so much :confused: But maybe I'll email the guys and see if anyone else is into it!

Safe dives! Enjoy that new suit :)
Aaron
 
Fondueset

Fondueset

Carp Whisperer
Jul 27, 2004
4,604
734
203
17
I'm using a pretty high end 'organic' conditioner (smells faintly of grapfruit) and am hoping this avoids any tox weirdness. If not I'll probably resort to fish guts or something....
 
donmoore

donmoore

New Member
Aug 19, 2002
958
154
0
62
I have been using silicone spray for several months now after the suit dries, like ramstam. My suit was about a year old before I started this and there were some small tears starting. The tears seemed to have completely stopped. I still use lube (shampoo, conditioner, etc), but with the silicone spay it now goes on much better and getting the lube in every little place isn’t as important.

I believe the silicone spray is helping to protect and preserve the delicate open cell. The spray I use is from Walmart and is less than $3 a can. One aerosol can lasts about 10 applications. I put it on pretty thick.
don
 
Erik

Erik

Well-Known Member
Jan 21, 2001
4,731
753
218
donmoore said:
I have been using silicone spray for several months now after the suit dries, like ramstam.

Ahh.... the Teflon Don! :)
Cheers,
Erik Y.
 
icarus pacific

icarus pacific

Human-in-training
Nov 7, 2001
2,880
212
0
63
When it comes to all things smooooth, ask no further. :king

Using that high-end conditioner mixed 50/50 with water and liberally applied via spray bottle to the inside of the suit and then then spread all over by balling the thing up and massaging it will do the trick. The question as to what to do when the spray bottle is on the sink where you're sure you wouldn't forget it and you're at the beach looking at flat seas, is this- Grab some kelp, seaweed or whatever organic-looking stuff you can find thats not covered up with sand and ball it up as a sponge and push it all over the interior and out the legs and arms. The slime from the dead kelp will do the trick and leave you zit and pimple free. Indeed no less a source than Bill will tell you that the dakine slippery stuff is to take a healthy handfull of kelp, jam it in a little mesh bag and let the stuff uh, ferment to the point of goo. The lube of champions and studly, oldschool divers, everywhere.

Push that handfull into a Duckett suit and go to work!



Any word on the missus' fam, Erik?
 
Fondueset

Fondueset

Carp Whisperer
Jul 27, 2004
4,604
734
203
17
What an exciting idea! Alas - here in the great lakes we have no kelp. :( Though I am familiar with the goo of which you speak. I'm sure it has a veritable host of anti-aging cosmetic properties not to mention being just dynamite of sensual massage...
I'm told current visibility is 70-80 feet with water temps about 4c. Should know more tomorrow :)
 
J

Jersey Jim

New Member
Mar 21, 2002
108
23
0
60
I put my Elios jacket on in the water when temps permit. I do most everything Rcerdena does to don/doff the jacket. However, this year I had an elbow injury that required me to go against Elios' recommendation. I first fold the torso inside out halfway. With NO lube at all I stand in water waist deep, or on boat ladder and insert arms. I have a couple of seconds to easily position the fabric before water runs out. I then dunk the remaining half in water and collect as much as possible, hold breath and insert head. It is VERY easy without lube if done with lots of water. The water gets trapped and forced the material one size larger for a moment, allowing it to slide on like a glove. And as Rcerdena stated, it stays in place like a second skin without lube. When I used to use lube, I would pull the bottom front part of the jacket open and submerge a couple of feet while remaining vertical. This would force water into the suit and flush out the lube. In hot weather it drives me absolutely insane to be hot, sweating and lathering under my suit. The suit would slide around and drive me nuts! Once you get the techinque down to perform in a couple of seconds, the water works very well. The only catch is you only have a couple of seconds to get it right. As far as the bottoms, I only lube the calf and ankle, fold pants inside out except for the calf down. I don't force anything in other than a foot or so of suit. I then "peel on" the suit from the shins up, the same way I peel it halfway down when using the bathroom before a dive and don't want to remove the suit more than necessary. I then flush out the lube from the waist out of the ankles with water (in water) before putting on the jacket. This seems to put a lot less stress on the pants than the way I used to put them on. There is no more "stretching" the pants over the long thighs/calves, but peeling it on, or "rolling" it on from shins up, as you would with a commonly used male apparatus :) I forgot to mention when taking off the jacket, pull the bottom front of the suit open and submerge a couple of feet to force a layer of water into the torso and arms. This "breaks the seal" against the skin, and when catching water in the exterior front of the suit to pull it over your head, it occurs in once fast smooth action. Be sure to pull each arm out (one at a time) in one quick motion while a film of water is still in the sleeves. This seems to be very gentle on the suit seams. I hope this helps, Jim
 
  • Like
Reactions: flyboy748
flyboy748

flyboy748

Well-Known Member
Sep 18, 2003
415
58
118
Excellent advice and explanation Jim Thanks, I'll give it a try, however not in these water temps!

Chris, did you make it out for a dive today?? A buddy and I did... 3C water and 1.5m vis :( Hope the vis was better for you. Still good to get out tho!

Aaron
 
Fondueset

Fondueset

Carp Whisperer
Jul 27, 2004
4,604
734
203
17
My suit is 'Black Shadow' neoprene - with their black slide coating. Frankly I cannot imagine getting into it without lube - perhaps if it was a 3mil. Is your lined with fabric? This is pretty dense neoprene, very flexible and strong, but not easy to stretch.

My suit had it first 'baptism under water' today - 24 F air temp with a steady 10mph wind. Whitecaps broke up any surface ice that formed last night.
I wasn't even thinking about getting cold - the water was 40f at the warmest, probably more like 38F. Moreover my condition was less than optimal :) As a person who drinks maybe one glass of wine per year I had two of champagne last night. This was enough to leave me with a formidable headache and a high quease factor. I took two aspirin - also nearly unheard of - resulting in thinner blood. Thus depleated I was only begining to feel a faint chill after walking half-a-mile in the suit to get to a good entry point. The 15dollar neoprene boots I bought on sale here kept my feet actually HOT! The very nice little cressi 2mil gloves were fine for my hands and my body was much warmer once I got in the water. Putting my face in, however, activated last-night's abuse rather radically - resulting in an instant urge to vomit - and preventing my experimenting to see if my face would adapt or simply shatter.. still, I let water in, floated around and swam for fifteen minutes or so despite the sudden hangover effect and there was just no hint whatsoever of cold. Pretty amazing.

I'd say for my needs this suit is definitely overkill. Next one will be 3 mil - probably with thermic-pile lining and a larger 3mil hooded vest for when it's cold. This 5 mil suit really appears to have no limits and, provided my face can take it, I'm sure I could be checking out icebergs this winter. Elios obviously does fab work - this thing is unbelieveably warm!

Visibility was lousy :( Will try again soon under more..er.. optimal conditions :)
Basic objective accomplished however: get in on new years day :cool:

Two questions: What do y'all like for weight belts (I have a standard nylon one which, of course, rides up.)
And - any face advice for cold water? I think I may not have pulled the front of my hood down - and clearly it was a mistake to try and defog my mask by pulling it partially off while submerged..
 
Last edited:
portinfer

portinfer

Aquatic shopper...
Jul 3, 2003
1,327
407
173
Hi Fondueset
Ok here is my personal experience :

Putting on suits
----------------
I have an Elios 5mm heiwa mid-density / opencell inner (no linings) / kanako outer.
I didn't like the idea of using shampoos etc (most if not all have some pretty nasty stuff in them - read the labels - but anyway, not a time to preach !) so what I do is take a couple of bottles of hot water to the beach and with the first one I douse myself with the hot water and then douse the inside of the suit.
It slips on without a hitch.
I first started using shampoo for a few dives but can honestly say that I find little difference - it is no a problem with hot water.

I save the second bottle for a nice rinse before getting dried off and going home !

Belts
------
I just bought a couple of cressi rubber belts. A mate uses the marseille type belt (buckle). So far I have been using horrible nylon but hopefully these rubber ones will solve the problem of slippage.
I bought two cos scubastore rarely seems to have them in stock and also I thought that I could load each one differently depending on type of diving. ie freediving or shallow spearfishing.

And if I get really skint then I can flog one ... like gold-dust !

Hope that was helpful
Ed
 
flyboy748

flyboy748

Well-Known Member
Sep 18, 2003
415
58
118
Chris,
Rubber belts are the way to go. I'm sure I'll never wear a nylon belt again! I like the Marseille style that Ed mentioned, however I just bought another with a regular scuba style cinch buckle. I like my old one so much tho that I haven't got around to trying the new one!

As far as the face is concerned... The good news is that you have options!! Three options to be exact. 1-wear nothing on your face, it goes numb in less than 3 minutes, but as you know the three min are pretty harsh :( 2-buy an ice mask. Look under this thread [ame="http://forums.deeperblue.net/showthread.php?t=39895"]Ice Cap[/ame] I think there's even a link there somewhere to buy them. Option 3-Don't dive when the water is colder than 50 :D But since for you and I that would severly limit the season, I'd recommend the ice mask! I dove all last winter without one, just waiting for my face to stop hurting for the first few minutes each time... After my dive yesterday however, I think I'm gonna break down and buy one this year.

Cheers,
Aaron
 
Fondueset

Fondueset

Carp Whisperer
Jul 27, 2004
4,604
734
203
17
Thanks!
I think it's possible my mistake was the normal submerged mask rinse maneuver - plus my eyebrows immediately froze when i surfaced due to a fairly intense windchill :) During spring/summer/fall I never encountered water THAT cold! Even thermalclines that hurt the tips of my ears didn't seem all that bad after a couple of minutes (no hood, too big 3/2 suit). My guess is it never got much below 45f. I gotta try it again before I resort to an ice mask. Wish I had some kelp - then I'd be completely macho :girlie
 
V

Veronika

Well-Known Member
Nov 13, 2003
215
25
118
Hi,

well, it finally happened - putting on the suit without lube was not such a good idea, at least for me it definitely didn't work... :ban
Any hints in what is the best glue to use for fixing tears ? I just know Aquasure and I was told that it will loose its flexibility with time.

Thanks,

Veronika
 
flyboy748

flyboy748

Well-Known Member
Sep 18, 2003
415
58
118
Hi Veronika,
Sorry to hear about your suit... :( The good news however that a repaired suit works as well as a new one! I've repaired my 7mm Picasso suit a couple times now ;)

I've used black "Aquaseal Seal Cement" and also Picasso wetsuit glue. I like the Picasso glue best. Easy to work with and cheap to buy in the DB store! Just apply the glue to the edges, allow to dry (probably 5-8 min.) then re-apply and allow to dry to the touch. When you put it together, get it lined up 'cause once it touches it's stuck! Press the seams together well with your fingers and leave it for a few minutes and you should be done.

You shouldn't need to stich the seams, and if you've got an unlined suit, then you really shouldn't stich at all. Probably if you talk to a scuba store they'll recommend stiching the tear together, but they're more familiar with double lined suits.

Happy repairs!
Aaron
 
  • Like
Reactions: Veronika
icarus pacific

icarus pacific

Human-in-training
Nov 7, 2001
2,880
212
0
63
Keep away from the Aquaseal unless you're building up the soles on your boots. It dries too hard and inflexible, especially if you add the accelerator to it, and then the tear becomes one big weak spot around the glue. The Picasso glue is the stuff to get.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Veronika
DeeperBlue.com - The Worlds Largest Community Dedicated To Freediving, Scuba Diving and Spearfishing

ABOUT US

ISSN 1469-865X | Copyright © 1996 - 2022 deeperblue.net limited.

DeeperBlue.com is the World's Largest Community dedicated to Freediving, Scuba Diving, Spearfishing and Diving Travel.

We've been dedicated to bringing you the freshest news, features and discussions from around the underwater world since 1996.

ADVERT