Guest viewing is limited
  • Welcome to the DeeperBlue.com Forums, the largest online community dedicated to Freediving, Scuba Diving and Spearfishing. To gain full access to the DeeperBlue.com Forums you must register for a free account. As a registered member you will be able to:

    • Join over 44,280+ fellow diving enthusiasts from around the world on this forum
    • Participate in and browse from over 516,210+ posts.
    • Communicate privately with other divers from around the world.
    • Post your own photos or view from 7,441+ user submitted images.
    • All this and much more...

    You can gain access to all this absolutely free when you register for an account, so sign up today!

  • Hi Guest - just to let you know that we performed some work on the forums recently. You may use this thread report any issues you encounter.

Swb

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
It can take a long time to get an up-to-date response or contact with relevant users.

primoz kosak

Well-Known Member
Jul 21, 2001
17
2
88
56
I wonder if any of you experienced a shallow water blackout? How do you feel after the SWB? What is yours pattern for hyperventilation for each immersion when you dive several hours?

Thank's for replies about my lungs collapse question. I think, when the depth and pressure are so great and lungs became so small the blood fill the lungs to prevent chest breaking.

Primoz
 

hydro

Well-Known Member
Aug 10, 2001
41
7
98
I had only one swb in over ten years of diving. It is not a surprise that it happened when I started experimenting with hyperventilation before the dives. I was coming up after a long and deep dive and I clearly remember making it to the surface. I lost consciousness without any notice or warning and regained consciousness after an interval I can only assume was around 1 minute(?). I was a few feet underwater cramped, disoriented and drinking water. I remember trying to figure out which way was up and how blurry my vision was. With tremendous effort I managed to kick to the surface and breathe for my life.
It took barely a minute to feel as if nothing had happened.
I was careless and did not observe rule #1 of freediving: NEVER dive alone.
My 2 cents of advice is if you want to keep diving for many hours try to prepare for each dive with as little hyperventilation as possible and pace yourself so that you allow for recovery between dives.

Hydro
 

Gattaca

New Member
Aug 21, 2001
17
0
0
50
Wow! I've never heard of a solo diver surviving a SWB! It sounds like a very serious situation, even with a buddy watching your every move. Has anyone been diving with a buddy who suffered a SWB? I wonder how difficult it is to rescue someone under these conditions.

Nate
 

hydro

Well-Known Member
Aug 10, 2001
41
7
98
Nate
I haven't heard of another solo freediver surviving SWB either. I consider it the closest I've been to a miracle. Diving has never been the same after that. I still dive alone sometimes but I'm a thousand times more conservative on bottom times and depth.
I have a friend who had to be rescued from SWB. His dive buddy released the weight belt and pulled him to surface. From what the buddy said, the victim came to almost on its own (no CPR).

Hydro
 

Cliff Etzel

Photographer & Visual Storyteller
Jul 7, 2000
549
34
118
58
Take a look at this question in the forum

I had to post a response to this question due to the nature of it here in the forum.

Does SWB really exist?

Let me know what yor thoughts are on my response.
 

Gattaca

New Member
Aug 21, 2001
17
0
0
50
Cliff - I thought your reply was a little hard on the original poster, but clearly well intended.

Hydro - That is very interesting that SWB recovery usually occurs w/o CPR and, in your case, even while still submerged. I'm not sure how you managed, but I agree that you are very fortunate, and I'm glad you are still here to pass on your experience.

Just yesterday, I was reading about Terry Mass's son Lauren's fatal diving accident (I was a business major at CU-Boulder also, so I felt somewhat connected). It seems the more I hear about SWB, the more content I am to settle for dry apnea training on my couch!

You mentioned that you take more precautions as a result of your experience. Has your training progress suffered as a result of these measures? Thanks for your guidance.

Nate
 

hydro

Well-Known Member
Aug 10, 2001
41
7
98
Cliff- The reply was a bit harsh but the question was expressed in a rather inappropriate manner. So, I guess the tone was justified.

Nate- I was a young diver who counted on talent and bravado for impressive performance. I now feel so sorry for my previous attitude towards this beautiful but dangerous sport. The SWB incident was an opportunity to learn more about diving physiology and becoming more conscious of my body functioning and limitations. My diving has become more disciplined and my training more systematic and safe. Both my depth and bottom times have improved. But most importantly, I feel I am safer than before at any depth. I find it impossible to go alone and start doing 30m dives like I used to. Training out of the water is as important and I will substitute dry for wet training when I can't find anyone to go with me in the water.
I know daring is what attracts many people in this sport but this is nowhere near the essence of diving. Growth as a diver means increasing respect for the sea and for life -including ones own.

Hydro
NY, NY
 

Cliff Etzel

Photographer & Visual Storyteller
Jul 7, 2000
549
34
118
58
Originally posted by hydro
Cliff- The reply was a bit harsh but the question was expressed in a rather inappropriate manner. So, I guess the tone was justified.

Nate- I was a young diver who counted on talent and bravado for impressive performance. I now feel so sorry for my previous attitude towards this beautiful but dangerous sport. The SWB incident was an opportunity to learn more about diving physiology and becoming more conscious of my body functioning and limitations. My diving has become more disciplined and my training more systematic and safe. Both my depth and bottom times have improved. But most importantly, I feel I am safer than before at any depth. I find it impossible to go alone and start doing 30m dives like I used to. Training out of the water is as important and I will substitute dry for wet training when I can't find anyone to go with me in the water.
I know daring is what attracts many people in this sport but this is nowhere near the essence of diving. Growth as a diver means increasing respect for the sea and for life -including ones own.

Hydro
NY, NY

I get a little defensive about the sport of freediving. It is near and dear to my heart - I don't worship it, mind you. But many questions that are asked are due to a lack of initiative to research more fully the sport and all aspects of it.

This tone in my responses will probably occur from time to time - it is the nature of who I am... I respect those who do their homework before asking questions and become quite annoyed by those who don't... especially on topics that have been well documented

Having worked in journalism as both a photographer and writer for as long as I have (10+ years), doing your homework is a skill that isn't taught much anymore. Instead we figure someone else will do the work for us... thus creating a lazy mind.

Opinionated... YUP! :head

BTW - I agree with you 110% - Growth as a diver means increasing respect for the sea and for life - including ones own.
 
DeeperBlue.com - The Worlds Largest Community Dedicated To Freediving, Scuba Diving and Spearfishing

ABOUT US

ISSN 1469-865X | Copyright © 1996 - 2021 deeperblue.net limited.

DeeperBlue.com is the World's Largest Community dedicated to Freediving, Scuba Diving, Spearfishing and Diving Travel.

We've been dedicated to bringing you the freshest news, features and discussions from around the underwater world since 1996.

ADVERT