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Transitioning From Open Heel Fins To Closed Heel Fins

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
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annc

annc

Member
Apr 11, 2022
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Hi, I've always used open heel fins as a snorkeler and scuba diver and have made the jump to a pair of Omer EagleRays fins as I'm interested in getting into a bit of freediving. It was a spur of the moment online purchase and they seem to have good reviews and are geared towards beginners.

However, I'm finding them a bit daunting as they take so much longer to get on. Once on, they fit like a glove but I haven't worked so hard to get into a piece of clothing so hard since my Jordache jeans circa 1980. I keep on putting off bringing them on the boat so they sit languishing away in my closet. I'm wondering if anyone here has tips for making the fin pockets a little softer and more malleable. I've ordered some lycra socks which will hopefully help but I still think I might struggle a bit on a small rocking boat loaded with a big mackerel esky . Any tips would be greatly appreciated!!

Thanks, Ann
 
DRW

DRW

Vintage snorkeller
Jan 5, 2007
294
117
133
The following image from the Australian Eyeline website shows how to fit snug-fitting full-foot fins more easily by turning the heels inside out:
EF4.jpg

If the foot pockets are already tight fitting, consider trying another pair one size larger. If these chance to be on the loose side, fin grips and/or insoles can be deployed:
jpg.191945

6041_articoli_foto_1.jpg
 
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annc

annc

Member
Apr 11, 2022
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Thank you, unfortunately the fin pocket is too stiff to turn inside out. Buggar, I got pretty excited, it sounded like a great solution.
I'm hoping that if I leave them on the deck, they'll warm up and be more pliable. In the meantime, while I wait for the weather to get better I'll take them to the pool to do laps and hopefully learn to love them.
 
marco15499

marco15499

Laguneros Spearfishing
Apr 4, 2011
351
142
83
Lycra socks would definitely help. You can also mold them to your feet using heat. Bring water to boil, put the footpockets in the boiling water for 5 minutes and wear them with the socks you normaly use until they cool down.
 
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bekzclz11

New Member
Apr 12, 2022
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The key difference between open-heel vs. full-foot fins is that open-heel fins are typically worn with a thick-soled dive boot (bootie), while full-foot fins can be worn barefoot. That makes open-heel fins better for SCUBA and cold-water activity.
 
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Brochman

Brochman

Well-Known Member
Jul 16, 2016
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Slosh some water in the foot pockets just as you are going to put the fins on and your feet will slide in much quicker and easier. Closed heel fins can also be used in cold waters you just buy the fins one size too big and wear 5-7mm socks weather depending. Spearos and freedivers use close heeled fins in cold waters off Greenland I use them near Norway.
 
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annc

annc

Member
Apr 11, 2022
22
8
8
60
Lycra socks would definitely help. You can also mold them to your feet using heat. Bring water to boil, put the footpockets in the boiling water for 5 minutes and wear them with the socks you normaly use until they cool down.
That's a great idea, I'll wait till my lycra socks arrive.
The key difference between open-heel vs. full-foot fins is that open-heel fins are typically worn with a thick-soled dive boot (bootie), while full-foot fins can be worn barefoot. That makes open-heel fins better for SCUBA and cold-water activity.
Thanks, I have a long history of open heeled for snorkeling in the tropics because they're easier to get on. It also makes it easier to cover guests who may come out with us keeping a couple of extra pairs on the boat.
Slosh some water in the foot pockets just as you are going to put the fins on and your feet will slide in much quicker and easier. Closed heel fins can also be used in cold waters you just buy the fins one size too big and wear 5-7mm socks weather depending. Spearos and freedivers use close heeled fins in cold waters off Greenland I use them near Norway.
Thank you, I'll give it a go that way.
 
annc

annc

Member
Apr 11, 2022
22
8
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60
Just a little update :) I've been swimming in the pool a few times with my fins to get used to them. It's funny how apprehensive I was, thinking my legs may not be strong enough for surface kicking for long periods but it's been all good. Finally had a break in the weather and got out on the reef with them. They were great for getting down but I'm still getting used to be longer in the leg and the awkward feeling I'm too close to coral. I'm snorkeling alone so it was also nice that when I put my fins up little creatures that were getting a little too close swam off.

The boiling water trick worked a treat, they are much easier to pop on and off now, Thank you!


Shark bait
 
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