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Very new in free-diving

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
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Missmoski

Missmoski

New Member
Jun 23, 2022
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Hi everyone, my name is Moski, I am from Taiwan originally. I am very new to free-diving, haven’t pass the certificate test yet, but with some questions in mind. Would be great to meet diving bodies here!
 
M

musubi

Active Member
Feb 9, 2017
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Hi everyone, my name is Moski, I am from Taiwan originally. I am very new to free-diving, haven’t pass the certificate test yet, but with some questions in mind. Would be great to meet diving bodies here!
Welcome! It's great you're taking the freediving course. Let us know what questions you have.
 
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Missmoski

Missmoski

New Member
Jun 23, 2022
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First one, is free diving an aerobic or anaerobic exercise?
 
M

musubi

Active Member
Feb 9, 2017
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First one, is free diving an aerobic or anaerobic exercise?
My thoughts are that both are important in training for freediving to help improve conditioning and efficiency. For me, in performing the actual freedive itself, I'm trying to conserve energy rather than expend it, which is a little opposite when I think of exercising. However, if it had to be one or the other, then freediving is more aerobic.
 
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Missmoski

Missmoski

New Member
Jun 23, 2022
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Is it a serious question? Lookup the definitions of aerobic and anaerobic and you will know your answer!
For exercise scientifically, yes, it is a serious question for me.
 
Missmoski

Missmoski

New Member
Jun 23, 2022
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O
My thoughts are that both are important in training for freediving to help improve conditioning and efficiency. For me, in performing the actual freedive itself, I'm trying to conserve energy rather than expend it, which is a little opposite when I think of exercising. However, if it had to be one or the other, then freediving is more I think it’s both too :)
 
vrokhlenko

vrokhlenko

Well-Known Member
Sep 22, 2002
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For exercise scientifically, yes, it is a serious question for

Yes, you must minimize burning your oxygen and thus any muscle activity. But freediving is as anaerobic as it gets. Per definition of what 'anaerobic' is. Indeed, freediving is an art of relaxation and equalization - you must learn how to freedive without blowing into your nose if you want to go below 35 meters. However there are a lot of misinformation in freedivng about the proper kicking technique (I am a professional swimmer and I know garbage technique advices when I see it) and it is a very dangerous activity that should never be practiced alone. There are plenty of instructors that will gladly take your money. As somebody who has decades of swimming expereince on a pretty high level I view most of this instructors as charlatans :) Good luck!
 
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dannyboy001

dannyboy001

Member
Jul 1, 2022
16
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Hi Moski

Welcome, I am new too.
Freediving is a lot more aerobic than people think.
A common misconception is that because you are underwater - and not in an environment containing air (oxygen), is that the activity is therefore anaerobic.

Even when underwater - oxygen is present in both your blood as well as throughout your airways in sufficient quantity for your muscles to create energy for your freedive.
This is shown by a steady increase in carbon dioxide (CO2) which is produced throughout your ENTIRE freedive.

Swimming technique (to be as oxygen efficient as you can be) combined with breath holding are therefore of importance.

Anaerobic cellular respiration does not require oxygen, and will produce unwanted lactic acid.
High intensity powerful muscle movements such as jumping a high as you can, or lifting a heavy weight - will increase anaerobic activity.
Struggling to pull back a strong rubber band on a speargun would be an example of this - regardless of whether the person is underwater on a breathhold or doing it on their sofa.

Whilst doing an exercise both aerobic and anerobic cellular can take place at the same time - however the level of muscle intensity will determine the ratio of the two.

Although anaerobic training can be beneficial, muscle mass is developed more easily compared to aerobic training.
If there is excess muscle mass that is not needed for your freedive, even if you don't use them they will still require oxygen.
 
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dannyboy001

dannyboy001

Member
Jul 1, 2022
16
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Hi Moski (apologies for the repost - I am dyslexic and was cooking dinner - hopefully below makes more sense)

Welcome, I am new too.
Freediving is a lot more aerobic than people think.
A common misconception is that because you are underwater - and not in an environment containing air (oxygen) that the activity is therefore anaerobic (this is not necessarily the case).

Even when underwater - oxygen is present in both your blood as well as throughout your airways in sufficient quantity for your muscles to create energy by AEROBIC cellular respiration.
Carbon dioxide is the waste product of this .This is shown by a steady increase in carbon dioxide (CO2) which is produced throughout your ENTIRE freedive.

Swimming technique (to be as oxygen efficient as you can be) combined with breath holding are therefore of importance.

Anaerobic cellular respiration does not require oxygen, however it will produce unwanted lactic acid (instead of carbon dioxide).
High intensity powerful muscle movements such as jumping a high as you can, or lifting a heavy weight - will increase anaerobic activity.
Struggling to pull back a strong rubber band on a speargun would be an example of this - regardless of whether the person is underwater on a breathhold or doing it on their sofa.

Whilst doing an exercise both aerobic and anaerobic cellular respiration can take place at the same time - however the level of muscle intensity will determine the ratio between the two.

Although regular anaerobic training can be beneficial, muscle mass is developed more easily compared to aerobic training.
If there is excess muscle mass that is not needed for your freedive, even if you don't use them they will still require oxygen.

The situations where freediving could become more anaerobic would be swimming at your maximum intensity and speed over a short distance.
Although there is oxygen in the blood the cardiovascular system would not be able to circulate and deliver it in time to the muscles. As such the muscle cells would have no choice but to produce the energy required by anaerobic activity instead.
However the ability for muscles to continue high amounts of anaerobic activity would only be for seconds before fatigue and lactic acid sets in.

Therefore the majority of freedivers will work at a much lower intensity where aerobic cellular respiration is able to take place - this way several minutes can be achieved under water and a greater further distance covered.
 
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Missmoski

Missmoski

New Member
Jun 23, 2022
7
0
1


Yes, you must minimize burning your oxygen and thus any muscle activity. But freediving is as anaerobic as it gets. Per definition of what 'anaerobic' is. Indeed, freediving is an art of relaxation and equalization - you must learn how to freedive without blowing into your nose if you want to go below 35 meters. However there are a lot of misinformation in freedivng about the proper kicking technique (I am a professional swimmer and I know garbage technique advices when I see it) and it is a very dangerous activity that should never be practiced alone. There are plenty of instructors that will gladly take your money. As somebody who has decades of swimming expereince on a pretty high level I view most of this instructors as charlatans :) Good luck!
Cheers, I think I need a lot more time to practice, as well as getting used to the deep water. Never freedive alone is surething, it is a self challenge more then a competition for my self. I can swim very slowly, but the dark depth of the ocean is the reason of my fear. I literally closed my eyes the first training in the sea with an instructor, and other practitioners.

Good to hear from you! Thanks!
 
Missmoski

Missmoski

New Member
Jun 23, 2022
7
0
1
Hi Moski (apologies for the repost - I am dyslexic and was cooking dinner - hopefully below makes more sense)

Welcome, I am new too.
Freediving is a lot more aerobic than people think.
A common misconception is that because you are underwater - and not in an environment containing air (oxygen) that the activity is therefore anaerobic (this is not necessarily the case).

Even when underwater - oxygen is present in both your blood as well as throughout your airways in sufficient quantity for your muscles to create energy by AEROBIC cellular respiration.
Carbon dioxide is the waste product of this .This is shown by a steady increase in carbon dioxide (CO2) which is produced throughout your ENTIRE freedive.

Swimming technique (to be as oxygen efficient as you can be) combined with breath holding are therefore of importance.

Anaerobic cellular respiration does not require oxygen, however it will produce unwanted lactic acid (instead of carbon dioxide).
High intensity powerful muscle movements such as jumping a high as you can, or lifting a heavy weight - will increase anaerobic activity.
Struggling to pull back a strong rubber band on a speargun would be an example of this - regardless of whether the person is underwater on a breathhold or doing it on their sofa.

Whilst doing an exercise both aerobic and anaerobic cellular respiration can take place at the same time - however the level of muscle intensity will determine the ratio between the two.

Although regular anaerobic training can be beneficial, muscle mass is developed more easily compared to aerobic training.
If there is excess muscle mass that is not needed for your freedive, even if you don't use them they will still require oxygen.

The situations where freediving could become more anaerobic would be swimming at your maximum intensity and speed over a short distance.
Although there is oxygen in the blood the cardiovascular system would not be able to circulate and deliver it in time to the muscles. As such the muscle cells would have no choice but to produce the energy required by anaerobic activity instead.
However the ability for muscles to continue high amounts of anaerobic activity would only be for seconds before fatigue and lactic acid sets in.

Therefore the majority of freedivers will work at a much lower intensity where aerobic cellular respiration is able to take place - this way several minutes can be achieved under water and a greater further distance covered.
Thank you so much, Danny :) It helps me to understand further, I forget movements while feeling nervous, not mention the seasick is the point that I should overcome as well, gradually practice step by step will be my next step.

Cheers! And bon appetite
 
dannyboy001

dannyboy001

Member
Jul 1, 2022
16
8
8
35
It takes courage to do things that make you nervous so well done for the commitment.
With time I'm sure both the nerves and seasickness will improve.
I'm glad you are being safe and doing it with someone.
Being able to relax in the sea is a huge element to performance and enjoyment - it probably sounds ironic and unrealistic me saying to relax when the situation seems scary. It would be nice if we could easily flip a switch to reduce these feelings, hopefully in the near future you will achieve this.
 
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Missmoski

Missmoski

New Member
Jun 23, 2022
7
0
1
It takes courage to do things that make you nervous so well done for the commitment.
With time I'm sure both the nerves and seasickness will improve.
I'm glad you are being safe and doing it with someone.
Being able to relax in the sea is a huge element to performance and enjoyment - it probably sounds ironic and unrealistic me saying to relax when the situation seems scary. It would be nice if we could easily flip a switch to reduce these feelings, hopefully in the near future you will achieve this.

Thank you, it does take some time for me to get used to be in the water, very different way of controlling breath comparing with on the land.

To understand more the scientific side of diving environment, body interaction with sea water, and living creatures in the ocean helps reducing fears :)
 
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