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wetsuit glue

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
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cdavis

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First ever tear in my Elios. What advice from more experianced types on wetsuit glue?
 

7BDiver

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I really like the Stormsure Neoprene Queen adhesive and have used it to patch small tears in my smoothskin socks and smoothskin wetsuit. I have not used it on any long full tears yet. I find it works well for filing voids as well but needs to be worked in with a toothpick or something similar. The flexibility is really good and wont create a hard point and concentrate stress due to lack of stretch. Aquaseal + Neo in the tube is good for filling hard to reach areas because it is more fluid like but the cured cement doesn't resemble the original neoprene material as well.
 

xristos

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How should neoprene glue be used. Do you wait it to dry ? How long ? One coat two coats? I ve used in the past with poor results.
 

rubicon10

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The most common adhesive for wet suits is neoprene contact cement--Aqua seal is one brand name, Neoprene contact cement is thin and drys fast. You usually apply two coats, to both ends of wet suit. first coat, let dry for 5 minutes, then apply a second coat, let dry for 10 minutes. Then very carefully you attach to 2 glued ends together--you don't get a second chance. Always read label instructions and precautions before using any adhesive.
 
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A short description: The sooner you fix a tear the better. If you allow it to spread and also pick up oils from your skin or the environment, the less well a repair will be made.

Use wetsuit glue, not aquaseal.

Spread the tear apart, possibly place cardboard inside the suit.
Apply a thin layer of glue to both sides of the tear and make sure you get it on the edges of the nylon jersey.
Allow it to dry for an hour or more- it is critical that you figure a way to keep the two edges separated from each other.= possibly dive weight, boks, stretch over something.. etc.
Apply a second thin coat on both sides.
Allow to dry for 5 minutes, try not to touch the fresh glue with you fingers that can transmit contaminantes. The edges should be very tacky.
Very gently press the edges together, slowly and carefully, you may NOT be able to re-position.
If/when the edges are back together and aligned, pinch the material together with your fingers, for a few minutes.
Try to glue the torn fabric together.


Depending on the location of the tear, you may benefit from using an iron on repair material which is applied over the repair and on the nylon jersey - normally outside.

 
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