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Carbon Fiber Speargun Build step by step

I think my next build will be a multi stage loaded roller.

I guess the only draw back that this design may potentially have is
1. a very short band unless rear rollers for top deck of the gun is used, because a roller is 1 to 1 pull on the top and bottom if the top deck is not used you would need a rather large butt for the rubber to anchor onto.
2. because of the 1 to 1 pull on top and bottom the starting point for the rubbers on the bottom deck of the gun has to be inline or less than the connection point of top line to shaft, guess you could call it the ready to shoot position.

I think the two reasons above is the biggest problem with these guns as if you wanted to use this system you need to place the rear roller ideally behind the notches on the shaft because if you don't the rubber will not be on the rear roller when the gun is not cocked making it a pain to load, but because you want lots of force transmitted into the shaft over a period of time you cant just just pull the cords onto the rest tab and shoot.

@Black_Reef_Co looks like your guns solve these problems with a larger butt and larger loading handles? also i can see you designed the guns specifically for this system especially the origami range where the bands are hidden and will not interfere with holding the gun and maybe potential rubbing of rubber on the hand when shot. potential ouchie if your not wearing gloves?
Correct. A band inversion is somewhat needed at a specified barrel length. But then again you lose performance and somewhat defeat the purpose of the design when you invert bands around another wheel in the back. Given, there are other benefits to the rear wheel set such as reduced recoil. But above all, my design is an alternative for snapping wishbones on a wishbone riser. A good challenge I recommend would be to pursue/create a new method for protecting the longevity of a roller wishbone. Alemanni does this by having a crescent riser with smooth edges. Couple other companies have done similar, but few have innovated.

It's been about 3 years of R&D into my optimized designs with an array of different manufacturing techniques. Of which a design patent is definitely in the works for. But I truly despise band guns to begin with and plan to pursue a new route soon. Simultaneously Ive been trying to steer a few others[manufacturers] in the same direction to bring some sort of standardization when the time and newer alternative is proper.
 
Correct. A band inversion is somewhat needed at a specified barrel length. But then again you lose performance and somewhat defeat the purpose of the design when you invert bands around another wheel in the back. Given, there are other benefits to the rear wheel set such as reduced recoil. But above all, my design is an alternative for snapping wishbones on a wishbone riser. A good challenge I recommend would be to pursue/create a new method for protecting the longevity of a roller wishbone. Alemanni does this by having a crescent riser with smooth edges. Couple other companies have done similar, but few have innovated.

It's been about 3 years of R&D into my optimized designs with an array of different manufacturing techniques. Of which a design patent is definitely in the works for. But I truly despise band guns to begin with and plan to pursue a new route soon. Simultaneously Ive been trying to steer a few others[manufacturers] in the same direction to bring some sort of standardization when the time and newer alternative is proper.
does Alemanni have a roller that uses only a line on the top deck to my memory he doesn't. i guess the wish bones can be a problem especially if the rubber goes all the way through front rollers as well but with it only being the line on the setup were talking about its slightly less of a problem. much less tail flick when the shaft leaves the muzzle.
Do you think there is a problem with bands being to short lets say we make a 90 band stretch roller at 360% so rubber cut to 25? any experience with faster degradation due to shorter bands? maybe they stretch out faster?
 
Correcto. Minus the easier to load part as my "black reef style" true fusion band design has excessive stretch profile to take full advantage of the smaller platform. I build stout guns not meant for most people. But there's a reason for it: Latex has a terminal velocity that is dictated by many factors but most importantly by acceleration which is confined by distance in our speargun application. And Latex has a parabolic curve in regards to stretch %. Pete is prob shaking his head to the band stretch I use but people love it and newer rubbers seem to last plenty long even with the aggressive stretch

All of my guns have interchangeable wheels to run a multi stage loading single roller, coined a "mono roller" by Alemanni. So anyone can load them if they're simply strung up differently. I recommend trying out this band design. Inverted is stupid to me because it runs a pulley system on the "hot side" instead of the loading side which is outright silly for the added complexity

My hot take: If you're able to load higher tensioned bands, then roller is the way to go. Rollers are superior in that they can run very high band tension for higher performance, combined with heavier shaft profile capabilities with minimal recoil in a smaller package. Whereas a traditional gun under equivalent band tension would encounter shaft whip and unmanageable recoil... So all comes down to: Can you load 350%+ tension? Go roller.

Hope this helps with something! -- Quade
Thanks I think it definitely makes sense, not sure what you call the hot side though.
That's what UK spearfishing looks like:
So its not really a power game, but because you need to adjust fast recoil is a fierce enemy (its often that you have to take a shoot in a less than perfect position).
Btw your guns look great!
 
So its not really a power game, but because you need to adjust fast recoil is a fierce enemy (its often that you have to take a shoot in a less than perfect position).
Btw your guns look great!
I think this is where a invert may actually be useful you could easily rig up a 80 or 90cm barrel go with two bands one thick 18mm and another 16mm or if you want three bands go 2x 14mms, solid 7mm shaft, with the two band setup its the same as loading a gun with two bands super easy, if you want lower power take a band off. The good thing with the invert and the roller is the recoil is much less, the invert i use for most of my hunting has some but very little almost to the point i could in theory shoot at any angle without bracing the gun.
 
The rear rollers on an inverted roller allow you to put more rubber on the gun which has a degree of pre-stretch. When bands are pre-stretched you shoot off the top section of the cocked to shoot energy graph and leave the rest remaining in the gun. By doing this you can harvest a lot of energy from the long bands without overstretching a shorter length of rubber. Because there is only limited real estate on a speargun body use is made of top and bottom decks to run the bands over and that requires a second roller set. Recoil that speargun shooters complain about is actually the jerk or rate of change in acceleration. By spreading the force application during shooting over the full length of the gun body rather than just the rear section to just past mid length that lowers the jerk. That is all there is to it. Like any gun or cannon the conservation of momentum law still applies. What spearfishers don't notice is recoil pushes them and their gun back in the water as the gun shoots. That is the mass of you plus your gun versus that of the spear. The better you and the gun are coupled the less recoil you feel. Some guns in the past used arm braces to improve gun coupling, but those guns were usually spring guns which held at mid length tended to tip upwards in the hand.
 
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