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help on holding breath

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
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chris14

New Member
Aug 25, 2004
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I am very new to freediving and I was wondering how I could hold my breath long. Right now i can hold my breath around 1:10 and I want to be able to hold my breath to at least 3:00. Also when I take I ventilate and lake a breath i fill dizy and my vission blurs but after a few seconds everything goes back to normal. I was wondering if that was bad or if its normal.
 

carcharias

New Member
Aug 24, 2004
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I have the exact same question. Sometimes when I hold my breath I get a little dizzy too, then it goes back to normal. I think this might be from hyperventilating? I never get that when I breathe very slow and relaxed.
 

naiad

Apnea Carp
Supporter
Oct 11, 2003
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The problem of feeling dizzy will probably go after a while. It could be caused by hyperventilation, or by the change in blood pressure caused by holding your breath, or a combination of both.

Lucia
 

AltSaint

Pipe and Flippers
Dec 29, 2002
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Chris

As Lucia says, you are probably hyperventilating, which leads to lowered C02 levels, vasoconstriction, and hence reduced blood flow to the brain.

Concentrate on slower, deep breaths.

Also, having ambitious targets is not necessarily good. If you don't reach them as soon as you want, then you get frustrated and stressed, and this reduces your potential. It becomes a vicious cycle.

If you do make gains too quickly, you may find that you will experience blackout or samba. ( Especially if you are hyperventilating as well! ). If you want to avoid that, then build up gradually.

You'll get to a respectable breathold time soon enough.

Mark
 

naiad

Apnea Carp
Supporter
Oct 11, 2003
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Originally posted by AltSaint
Also, having ambitious targets is not necessarily good. If you don't reach them as soon as you want, then you get frustrated and stressed, and this reduces your potential. It becomes a vicious cycle.
I agree - when I first started, my aim was not any particular time/distance/depth, but whatever improvements I could make at the time. It is much better to be happy with the progress you are making than to think "I still can't do that".

Good luck

Lucia
 

Aquagenic

New Member
Jul 19, 2004
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Yeah, the dizzy/black out thing only happens to me when I Hyperventilate to much. If I just take it slow there are never any problems. I like to do a five second inhale, with a ten second exhale for about a minute. This never causes any problems for me, but then again everyone is differen't.

Happy breath holding!


~Picksmith
 

bailfoy

New Member
Aug 7, 2005
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I am completely new at this, but the threads are very interesting. Any tips for increasing my dry static time without hyperventilating? I don't really like the dizzy feeling that i get when i do lots of deep breathing before a hold. What's the best way to mentally prepare myself? Thanks.
 

AB Diver

New Member
May 3, 2005
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Chris,
No worries about the time thing it will come with pracitce and before you know it you will be able to hold WAY longer than your friends. When I first started (about 4 months ago) I was only able to reach 2 min and that was really pushing it hard and having lots of very violent contractions. Now my personal best is 4 min 1 second. Now I can consistently reach over 3.5 min. Don't worry it will come with time. Although if I was you I would set my first goal at 2 min. Then go from there. Just cuz it feels good to reach your goals every now and then.
 

SanSan

New Member
Apr 22, 2005
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If u'r looking for improvement in times try this. Before the hold relax ur body and mind. Try to lay down on ur bed screening every part of ur body for muscular contractions and relax them. This will also relax ur mind and slow down ur heart rate. Remember to breath deeply and slow. The last breath should be as as it feels comfortible (for now) and than jut hold. Try not to think about time. U can go on and screen ur body... The hard part comes when it comes to contractions. Here comes the will power in question. If ur a beginner u probably could hold ur breath whey longer than the contractions alow u to. This will come with time and trainig. REMEMBER: NEVER HOLD UR BREATH ALONE in the water. Make sure there is allways somebody with u that will know what to do in case of a samba or black out. And dont forget to agree on the signs between the breathlold.
 
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ArcticFree

New Member
Aug 7, 2005
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So far I've learned alot by just reading posts here. Fabulous source for rookies! One thing I haven't come across though is how it FEELS when apnea lasts past the usual minute or two that rookies can manage. Myself, I can make 90 sec., but succumb to the discomfort of the ?Co2 buildup? Does this discomfort/pain go away when a Co2 tolerance is built up? Or does one simply learn to deal with it? I've never had contractions of the diaphragm before. Do these start after apnea beyond this uncomfortable period?

Cheers to all that put up with rookie questions! Thanks.
Clarke
 

immerlustig

BlueSkunk
Aug 17, 2002
597
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hi,

quote:
"Any tips for increasing my dry static time without hyperventilating?"

yes, actually: do statics regularly ;) your times will improve because you learn to relax more (o2 conservation) and co2 tolerance increases (delaying contractions).

i find the most difficult thing about statics is being motivated enough to train consistently. 2-3 times a week is already very good.

arctic free:

the vast majority of people have contractions (as far as i know) sooner or later. after a while of training (weeks) they'll be arriving later and later plus you will be able to hold a longer time of them. very slow deep breathing retains a lot of co2 in your body, you'll get contractions relatively early but they will be quite bearable. in the end your overall static time is longer compared to having hyperventilated beforehand (unless you are a beginner and your co2/o2 tolerance is very low).

anyway, have a trained buddy when you do breath-holds in water and practise rescue scenarios regularly.

now i'm off diving :)

roland
 
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Jaek

New Member
Feb 9, 2006
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Yeah, I am a beginner, also. I decided on monday I wanted to do this (I did not know it was a sport then) and started to look up hints on the internet. I stumbled upon this site and using its tips went from 47 seconds to 2:45. (I was almost asleep) I am finding lots of helpful hints here. Thanks for putting them out. Gotta go!
 

SanderP

Dive bum
Feb 10, 2006
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Can anyone give me a few tips for the beginning?

And a few rookie questions:
* What exercises should I do to hold my breath for longer?
* What is static?
* What should I do when I feel pressure/pain in my ears (I know I should clear my ears, but I dont know how)?

I just keep reading about the 'static' and 'ear clearing' things in the topics, but haven't found a topic that acctually says what they are and how to use 'em.
 
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DeepThought

Freediving Sloth
Sep 8, 2002
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Mr_Miyagi said:
* What exercises should I do to hold my breath for longer?
* What is static?
* What should I do when I feel pressure/pain in my ears (I know I should clear my ears, but I dont know how)?
By static we mean holding one's breath without moving (being static).
A good exercise for a start would be to do 'static tables' (do a search on that).
A word of caution: train dry for a start unless you have a partner who knows freediving safety.

Two common ways to equalize (clear) your ears are valsalva and frenzel.
To do valsalva you pinch your nose with your hand and try (gently) to blow air out of your nose, since your nose will be closed it will go to your ears (explained in the most lay way possible I think).
Frenzel is a little more technically demanding. You are supposed to pinch your nose as well but push the air with your tonque instead of your diaphragm. There is a document somewhere describing exercises on how to aquire this technique and some useful variations of it.

There are many threads about exercises for developing technique and trying to solve equalization problems.

Another note: try equalizing before you feel the pressure building, it will make equalization much easier.
 

SanderP

Dive bum
Feb 10, 2006
412
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Thanks a lot, DeepThought. I also found the txt file for the frenzel technique.

I'm currently searching for information about static tables. I seem to miss the point - I just don't understand how to use the tables (besides that, I don't know what 'apnea' means, neither does my english dictionary). Hope I find a FAQ or something.
Anyway, great information source this forum.
 
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naiad

Apnea Carp
Supporter
Oct 11, 2003
2,897
449
138
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Apnea means not breathing, in freediving it means holding your breath. :)

Lucia
 

lungfish

Go and do it
Sep 5, 2004
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Hi Miyagi and Jaek,
There are a few threads where your concerns have been discussed in general.... If you check out the Beginner Freediving forum/ New Freediver in Training thread you will find some answers to your questions about static tables, C02 tolerance, etc....

Both you guys are young and while you may want to become great freedivers, you have to be really careful about how you go about it. This sport is dangerous, just like skiing, sky diving, rock climbing, hang gliding, etc. At 100ft down you might as well be on the Moon. In fact, if you view training as serious as an astronaut does, you are probably in the right mindset.

If you have specific questions, keep asking them....

The best suggestion I have for you though is to take a class. www.performancefreediving.com since you are stateside. It is a four day intensive and many of us made it to 100ft by the end of it. Saves you lots of mistakes, wasted time, incorrect or dangerous techniques, bad advice, etc..... They give a thorough review of physiology, safety practices, technical information and training advice. Hard to beat it and you don't have to start at the very bottom.
 

SanderP

Dive bum
Feb 10, 2006
412
76
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Yesterday I made some excersises with CO2 tables (on bed). Later I tried to hold my breath as long as I can. At about 2:00 it got really bad and I began to sweat a little bit. And then about 5 seconds later it suddenly got better. I made it to 2:15, becouse I didn't quite know what happened - I think I could've hold it longer. After taking a deep breath, I felt a little dizzy, but else it was OK.
So, is this normal? Can anyone gess why did I felt better? What's the worst thing that can happen to you if you hold your breath for too long - can you still black out if you are not in the water?
 
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Morg

Georgian Bay Freediver
Jan 14, 2006
447
60
68
Mr_[LEFT said:
Miyagi[/left]]Yesterday I made some excersises with CO2 tables (on bed). Later I tried to hold my breath as long as I can. At about 2:00 it got really bad and I began to sweat a little bit. And then about 5 seconds later it suddenly got better. I made it to 2:15, becouse I didn't quite know what happened - I think I could've hold it longer. After taking a deep breath, I felt a little dizzy, but else it was OK.
So, is this normal? Can anyone gess why did I felt better? What's the worst thing that can happen to you if you hold your breath for too long - can you still black out if you are not in the water?
Good work,

Yes I also get very warm and sometimes begin to sweat, this really bothers me :(. I would much rather do statics in the water :).

The dizziness I am not familiar with so I'm sorry you will have to ask someone else about that :(.

For the black-out.. Yes you can still black out even out of the water but its a lot safer out of the water because once you come to you can start to breath.

There are 'humps' that you can overcome when holding your breath. I have noticed that around 1:50 I start to get contractions and then I begin to heat up very fast around 2:00 mark. These things sometimes pass, I did a 3:00 breath hold and I was pretty comfortable from 2:10 on.... I notice when I start to get contractions I swallow, I find this helps the intensity of the contractions. (I am pretty sure I read one of Eric Fattah's posts and got that information from there... not %100 the procedure does that but I will look into it.)
 
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Morg

Georgian Bay Freediver
Jan 14, 2006
447
60
68
I was searching for some information regarding the swallowing and I found this..

This helps if your going to be doing co2 tables... Eric Fattah has A LOT of usefull information so I suggest reading some of his posts. I do warn you however that he is very skilled at breath holding and may be talking about advanced techniques (example:'packing'; When you take your final breath you fill your cheeks up with air.). I am not at that stage yet to be doing them and I myself am thinking about doing co2 tables.

Here is a link to a thread that he talks about not getting a headache while doing C02 tables.
http://forums.deeperblue.net/forum15/thread34167.html?
 
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