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Indie/Minor Speargun Companies

OP
OP
spaghetti

spaghetti

Campari Survivor
May 31, 2005
4,669
1,495
353
51
Italy
:blackeye And so to restore the pride of Spain, here's another very interesting spanish brand: it's named Soriasub.

They make rollerguns either in carbon fiber (model "Arrow") and glass fiber (model "Arrow FV", for fibra de vidro). The Aesthetics is very nice, refined and catchy.

Here's the Arrow in carbon:
 

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Mr. X

Forum Mentor
Staff member
Forum Mentor
Jul 14, 2005
7,137
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Sunny Britain
Looks cool. Is there a revival in roller-guns going on, or did they never go away?
Anybody use a roller-gun? What did you think? (I recall that Foxfish made at least one.)
 
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OP
OP
spaghetti

spaghetti

Campari Survivor
May 31, 2005
4,669
1,495
353
51
Italy
Looks cool. Is there a revival in roller-guns going on, or did they never go away?
Anybody use a roller-gun? What did you think? (I recall that Foxfish made at least one.)
There is a "roller-frenzy" going on. Seems like it is the way-to-go gun for every DYI, artisan or major industrial gun builder. Omer too is launchin it's own Cayman roller: Omersub CAYMAN E.T. Speargun

Time will tell if it's a temporary fashion.

As for me, altough I appreciate good craftmanship and am always curious about new toys on the shelf, the more I grow old, the more I prefer the simple, old school, no-nonsense type of weapon. But it's just me.
 

foxfish

Silver Smoker
Staff member
Team Leader
Dec 31, 2005
12,910
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Guernsey, Channel Islands
That is a nice looking roller gun, I like fiberglass too, much easier & cheaper to work with & very durable.
I think rollers are just a fad too but I do like the idea.
 
OP
OP
spaghetti

spaghetti

Campari Survivor
May 31, 2005
4,669
1,495
353
51
Italy
:hmm More rollerguns from one more Spanish manufacturer. Company goes under the fancy name Fiber Bambu: guns are indeed made of bamboo covered with carbon fiber (eventually).
They're kitted with italian Ermes Sub mechanism and reel.

Like them or not, here they are:
 

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OP
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spaghetti

spaghetti

Campari Survivor
May 31, 2005
4,669
1,495
353
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Italy
Back to the old homeland Italy. Emme Wood is the brand under these fine creations from wood artist Enzo Montaruli in Apulia.
I may say I like them a lot, and the author of these beauty is an inspirational character. Ermes mech. :king
 

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popgun pete

Well-Known Member
Jul 30, 2008
2,984
576
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Australia
1975 "Scope-Arrow" speargun from Suwa Tekko Sho Company Limited of Osaka, Japan. A surface interface shooter you watch fish below through the barrel telescope with the muzzle end dipped in the water and pull the trigger on whatever you have in the scope “crosshairs”. Twin band propulsion sends the metal tipped fiberglass harpoon into the depths and if you score a hit then you wind the reel to pull the victim up to the surface.
Scope-Arrow-Gun.jpg

Note: an incorrect reel is fitted here as this gun was originally supplied with a "threadline" or "egg-beater" reel.
Scope-Arrow gun patent.jpg

Scope-Arrow patent detail R.jpg


Scope Arrow gun from boat.jpg
 
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popgun pete

Well-Known Member
Jul 30, 2008
2,984
576
153
Australia
Well there is absolutely no doubt what the gun is for now with all the patent info available. I see that the gun you purchased ended up in a tackle shop display. I saw one hanging just out of reach in a tackle and sports store and was intrigued by it, but the store owner was not very interested in talking about it and had no intention of selling it. The gun was brand new and completely unused, probably being only recently unpacked that Christmas as that is when I saw it in 1976/77.
 
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