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Powerlung Training

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
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C

cjborgert

Well-Known Member
Jul 29, 2001
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Re: Re: I doubt it

Another note is that the powerlung actually REDUCED breath-hold ability after a certain amount of training. Erik Y.

I wonder why this occurs? Understanding why airway resistance training can decrease breathhold ability could be a clue as to the best ways to increase it.

It would be also be interesting, at least to me, to know whether the phenomenon of reduced apnea ability after airway resistance training occurs in all athletes or only in some? In other words, is there some other component of training, such as pack strecthing, that counters an effect of airway resistance training that can otherwise reduce apnea ability?

I'm thinking here (for lack of better analogy) of weightlifting for skeletal muscles, where flexibility can be lost unless proper stretching is done to complement the weightlifting; with stretching, however, both strength and flexibility can be increased.
 
donmoore

donmoore

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Aug 19, 2002
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I’m no expert, but I do have some experience with the Expand-a-lung, which is basically a cheap power lung with the same resistance setting for both inhale and exhale. The manual said to really concentrate on exhaling fully even to the point of trying to force more. I also do this on the inhale and sometimes pack a little with it.

I believe it has strengthened my lungs in both exhaling and inhaling more fully. As I said, I’m no expert, I just started freediving in July, but my statics were staying around 3 minutes and after using the Expand-a-lung for a month it increased to 4:30.

If you don’t believe the theory that it decreases statics, which from my own experience and not seeing any evidence yet from those stating this, I don’t; I believe many are missing point. Sure you can bring up all kinds of its not any better than doing xxxx exercises, but you can do this exercise at the same time as doing many life chores. Try that with weight on your gut! Cliff Etzel brought out in his article that he does his at work in front of his computer. I do mine on my drive to work. Speaking of Cliff he believe it worked for him and recently stated that he planned on using it in his training for an attempt on the American dynamic record.

As for training routines, I keep it simple. I hang a towel from my neck to catch the Silva, get into my vehicle, put it in my mouth, and practice deep inhales and exhales until I park at work 15 minutes later. I wash it a home that night, and I’m ready to go again the next day. All total it adds about 3 minutes to my day, which gives me more time for doing all the other things we all have to do.
Don
 
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C

cjborgert

Well-Known Member
Jul 29, 2001
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GOOD POINTS!

Please excuse any typos . . . . I'm having a tough time typing this message with these 45 lb plates on my abdomen . . . :eek:

I'm not sure about using these in the car though . . . how do you manage to talk on your cell phone and exercise at the same time . . . I guess you can steer with your knees (???):D

I do recall Cliff mentioning the benefit that you can use these devices while doing other things, and thought his were excellent points. I lost track of where he came out on the effectiveness - last I read he was still evaluating, but that was some time ago - but it sounds as if at least two of you believe there are benefits. I also recall that Cliff was doing pack stretching, etc., so that might account for why he gets positive results while some others did not.

It makes sense to me that a resistance device and in conjunction with regular pack stretching could accomplish some real benefits. If however, one did the resistance training alone, that could strengthen the diaphram and intercostals but reduce flexibility, thereby actually decreasing the volume of maximal inhalation and increasing the amount of effort needed to pack. So maybe the benefit is in the combination. -Not uncommon in athletic training at all! -Again, I have no data - just trying to reason by analogy.
 
donmoore

donmoore

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Aug 19, 2002
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Those dam phones!

Yea the cell phone has interrupted my resistance training a few times in the car. What’s worse is my dry statics at work. I can’t tell you how many times I had a good one going only to hear, “Don line 3”!
Don
 
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tanteh

New Member
Nov 28, 2002
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dynamics

...what about some dynamics on the way to your chief..:t

... or dry equalization during the morning toilet (valsalva!)...

Carsten
 
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Tadpol

New Member
Dec 18, 2002
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When you freedive deeper, you will notice that it is more difficult to equalize do to the greater pressures. Therefore you need stronger muscles to overcome this pressure. (obviously) With the resistance breathing, it is much like doing curls for your biceps. Increased resistance over continious repitition builds a higher tolerance. Therefore, it is just like any other workout. However, I don't see how this will increase lung volume. But with stronger lungs, it makes equalizing more effortless. This results in less use of oxygen - producing less carbon dioxide. As us freedivers are all aware, it is not so much the lack of oxygen that limits our breath-holds, but the increase in carbon dioxide. So your result is longer bottom time.
If you are interested in increasing your lung volume, you can run sprints. Keep running sprints until you puke. Then run some more sprints!!As you are running, your body will require more oxygen to accomodate the over exertion of energy being used.(fat burning) This is when your lungs will try to gather more oxygen. The way they do that is to increase the surface area where the oxygen is being utilized. Doing this over and over will in-time make a noticable effect on your lung volume. If you would like proof. You can go get a spirometry test done at a local clinic. Then have it redone a few months later. (appx.$75 US) I have done this and increased from 4.8liters to 5.0liters in just a few weeks. (This advice was given to me by a US Navy Seal) So I took it as good advice! ;) I have just purchased the Expand-A-Lung to carry in my car for my driving PLEASURE! LOL!
 
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cjborgert

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Jul 29, 2001
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Equalize from lungs?

I'm not sure I follow your logic tadpole, unless you are referring to equalizing by the valsalva technique rather than frenzel (?).

But I agree that resistance training will not increase the volume of the alveoli, the bronchioles, or any part of the airway. I think most of us were referring to the possibility of strengthening the muscles that are used to make a maximal inhalation, and there is, of course, a big difference between those two processes.

Repeated maximal inhalations through a snorkel, wearing a tight wetsuit, weight belt and fins is a bit awkward, and seems (to me, anyway) to require more exertion than making a maximal inhalation while lying comfortably on the floor. Thus, I can understand how strengthening the diaphram could benefit a freediver. However, there does seem to be a number of views on how best to do that . . . sprints, resistance devices, weights on the abdomin, etc.

It seems to me that flexibility of the rib cage and tissues surrounding the airways is at least as important as the strength of the diaphram (or much more important, as I believe Erik Y. contends - and who am I to argue with him!) in making a maximal inhalation. The more flexible and supple the rib cage, the easier it is to fill the lungs completely, and thus, the less energy the freediver expends doing it. Likewise, the stronger the diaphram, the less relative effort is required to make a maximal inhalation. This is why it seems reasonable that strength and flexibility could be complementary.

In the end, I am sure Erik is correct (if I understand him correctly) . . . i.e., time spent increasing flexibility and control is more productive than time spent increasing strength.
 
Erik

Erik

Well-Known Member
Jan 21, 2001
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Thanks Ivan and CJ for the nice comments :)
Please remember that my opinion is only that!
Hope to dive with you guys sometime.
Ivan, are you near perth? I'm coming in March :)
You could teach me a few things about hunting I'm sure.
Cheers,
Erik Y.
 
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