Spit out the snorkel? | DeeperBlue.com Forums
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Spit out the snorkel?

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earthbm

New Member
Oct 19, 2020
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Was told today that YouTube freedivers remove the snorkels while underwater not just for the looks but also because the body won’t inhale the water (even is passed out) this way. True/false?
 

Jon305

Member
Jan 21, 2020
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From what ive heard and seen this is true, so if someone blacks out itll keep the mouth closed, i always do it too and i feel it makes things better overall anyway with equalizing and relaxing my jaw
 
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Michael-AT

New Member
Sep 28, 2020
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There has been an interesting discussion a few weeks back about this, where the conclusion was that it's actually safer to keep the snorkel in while diving.

Link to the thread (click)
It's definitely good to read the discussion and then form your own opinion. While I personally dive snorkel-in, I would not claim it is universally safer way to do. There are certainly pros and cons of each method. If you are pushing your limits and dive with a buddy (which you should always do), having the snorkel out just makes really sense.
 
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Leander

Well-Known Member
Oct 17, 2017
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It's definitely good to read the discussion and then form your own opinion. While I personally dive snorkel-in, I would not claim it is universally safer way to do.
Agreed.

I understand the reasoning behind snorkel-in, but to me it just feels horribly unnatural and makes me unable to relax. And in a way, being able to relax can be considered a safety too. Another issue for me with snorkel-in is that here there are always waves, and when clearing the snorkel just before surfacing the risk of getting a full breath of water is too big (it actually happened as I was experimenting with snorkel-in). Instead I made it my muscle memory to put in the snorkel right after the first surface breath, so it's a bit of a hybrid technique.

As with most things in freediving or any other dangerous activity, there isn't just one right way, there are many, and many more still to be discovered. Developing your own version, based on knowledge, experience and understanding is always better than just blindly copying what others say.

and dive with a buddy (which you should always do)
Even this has both pros and cons.
 
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camposartu

Member
Apr 19, 2018
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Hello all,
well if you are passed out underwater, whenever your body decides to take a breath you will swallow water with or without the snorkel. Of course we are all safe divers and have a good dive buddy to keep an eye on our safety ;););).

Now what really makes sense to me in favor of removing it is: if you pass out underwater, one of the tell tell signs is a full out exhalation. From what I understand, with the snorkel out, all those bubbles from the exhalation will be more visible as opposed to having the snorkel in the mouth. It makes sense to me but I have not tested this.

Stay safe!
 

dcvf

Member
Aug 15, 2015
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Hi everyone,

In 2004 in Red Sea, I repeated the 11 exercises for my ’S3’ level at the Lifras (the name of the Belgium federation…in Wallonia)
At this time nothing was told about the snorkel in mouth under the water !
One of the 11 exercice is 10 m DYN at 20 m. For sure I decided to dive at 21 m to log the depth in my ‘Apneist’…depth gauge
At 21m I stopped my descent to start the 10 m DYN, when I felt a very strange reaction in my throat (with my snorkel in my mouth!)
When I came on the surface I read the depth…24 m…my buoyancy was negative.
Concerning the ‘very strange reaction in my throat’ I decided never again to hold my snorkel in mouth…and few years later by ‘Apnea Academy, SSI-freediver and AIDA I got the confirmation ’don’t hold snorkel in mouth under the water’.
I read the following explanation concerning my ‘very strange reaction in my throat ‘.
Holding something between the jaws can cause a swallowing reflex.
Fortunately I didn't swallow any quantity of water…At 24 m !!!:eek:

I took the good decision before knowing the explanation :)
 

rakefirelikable

New Member
Sep 30, 2020
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Agreed.
I understand the reason behind it. It makes me unable to relax. And in a way,
being able to relax can be considered a safety too. I was experimenting with snorkel-in). Instead, I made it my muscle memory to put in the snorkel right after the first surface breath, so it's a bit of a hybrid technique fishing uae. Now what really makes sense to me in favor of removing it is: if you pass out underwater, one of the tell-tell signs is a full out exhalation.
 

rakefirelikable

New Member
Sep 30, 2020
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I Found always some good discussion in this form There has been an interesting discussion a few weeks back about this, where the conclusion was that it's actually safer to keep the snorkel in while diving. I have interested in fishing UAE and Alaska fishing spots.
 
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