• Welcome to the DeeperBlue.com Forums, the largest online community dedicated to Freediving, Scuba Diving and Spearfishing. To gain full access to the DeeperBlue.com Forums you must register for a free account. As a registered member you will be able to:

    • Join over 44,280+ fellow diving enthusiasts from around the world on this forum
    • Participate in and browse from over 516,210+ posts.
    • Communicate privately with other divers from around the world.
    • Post your own photos or view from 7,441+ user submitted images.
    • All this and much more...

    You can gain access to all this absolutely free when you register for an account, so sign up today!

static apnea training tables

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
It can take a long time to get an up-to-date response or contact with relevant users.
which table does everyone think is most useful(or which do you use more). the table with constant hold time and decreasing rest, the one wiht increasing hold and constant rest, or the free form one? or are the first two or all three important for all round training?
 
drunkinbda said:
which table does everyone think is most useful(or which do you use more). the table with constant hold time and decreasing rest, the one wiht increasing hold and constant rest, or the free form one? or are the first two or all three important for all round training?
The key to my training is the dining room table. :ko
 
Last edited:
I have used the table with constant breath hold, and have improved my personal best from 1:05 to 2:30 in about three weeks. But i guess the other ones can be just as effective. I only used it because it was the easiest.
 
hi

i personally never used these tables but here are some recommendations anyway.

in my experience it is very important, especially when starting out freediving training, to practice relaxation. the sooner and more efficient you are able to relax muscles, the earlier you start conserving precious o2.
for a static the preperation can start already 12-24 hours earlier with when and what to eat and how much sleep you get (i fend that personally extremely important). before the session a preperation of 2 minutes to get relaxed and in focus i would say is way too short. find something like at least 15-30 minutes where you just sit and breathe and concentrate on muscle relaxation. avoid moving and talking in between statics as much as possible because you will lose a lot of adaptation you just gained from a warm-up static (you can check that with a hr-monitor).
i personally wouldn't spend much time doing many statics with low intensity (unless for practicing relaxation) but rather do fewer statics with higher to max intensity. it seems that this will not only train your o2 tolerance, relaxation and ability to handle contractions but will train co2 tolerance at the same time.
what i also find very important is to pay attention to vitamins and antioxidants and take at least one rest day after static training.

regards

roland
 
I agree that warmup is kind of pointless if it's comfortable all the way. Tables may be useful in the beginning (I also tried them maybe once and moved on), but in the end, you'll want to listen to your body. For example, if my absolute max. is these days say, 70 contractions, I'll do warmups up to 30 contractions. No point even timing them, since time is irrelevant. The ability to withstand contractions is relevant. Then on the last warmup I'll do close to 70 and on the max try simply as long as I can. I don't look at any table while I do this, but naturally it looks like one, in terms of the breath hold time increasing with every hold.

Anyway, tables are good, but don't obey them blindly. You must push your comfort limit slightly with each hold for them to do any good (IMHO).

Personally I don't need all day to prepare, but I do make sure I don't eat ANYTHING for at least 3 hours before the static and perhaps eat slighlty lighter than normal on lunch. On a basic apnea day it might be like this for example:
8:00 light breakfast
11:00 Lunch (lot's of veggies etc, nothing too heavy)
14:00 1 banana
17:00 Start statics

But the part of that which makes the real difference (and it is a huge difference) is not eating 3 hours before starting.

I don't do any extra relaxation, other than warmup statics. I find that once you've done them enough, you simply learn to relax, it becomes a sort of reflex. But to get there, you need to do lots and lots of them. I believe that if one was to train only with one max static per session (no warmup), one would eventually learn to relax immediately and kick in the apnea reflex faster...But that's another (and much discussed) topic.
 
Last edited:
jome said:
But the part of that which makes the real difference (and it is a huge difference) is not eating 3 hours before starting.
I also don't eat before statics and it makes a huge difference. It might be the single most important thing that I can do to make statics easier.
 
yo ricochet.. what did you use to write that prog anyway?


i def dig it..i was having probs with the web based ones because of security settings and such, this one gets rid of that problem. And it gives me a nice icon on my quick launch!!
 
@Drinkinbda

JerseyJim swears by single-breath tables for training. If you're wondering about results, maybe he can post some profiles from last season on the East Coast Freediver group page.

None of the dives in the profile will be world records, but a whole day of diving with maybe 25% of the dives in the 3:00+ range and the majority of dives well over 2:00 adds up to a lot of bottom time -- more than a typical scuba-diver.
 
yeah..im still workin up to to the multiple minute times..lol

so you in PA too eh? where do you normally go to dive?
 
We dive at Dutch Springs a lot (btw, I'm "Mike" on EastCoastFreediver). There are two places in Lancaster too -- Bainbridge Sportsmen's Club and Wabank. In fact, we used to go to Wabank a lot, but it was closed this past year. Sometimes some of the guys do ocean dives in NJ and one of the guys (Dave Abel) lives in Long Island and spears up there sometimes.

Lately, I've been doing most of my diving on the road (FL, CA, the Yucatan in April etc.).

Where do you go to school in Philly?
 
hah..ooh..so you were the one makin fun of hte face ill make when i get down there!! awesome! im in school over in Selinsgrove. Susquehanna Univ. Its like dead in the middle of the state!

good to meet ya again

scott
 
Hi everybody

My name is Mark from England. Im a newbie in this arena. I do want to say that It would be my wish with hard training to be near 6.00 . I m looking at the forums and am in awe of everyone. My question is what tips would you give me . I started training 4 times a week in the pool, and have a running machine at home. How do you slow your heart beat down
 
HI all communitie !!

I´m Juan Pablo from Barcelona i just start with my first training and was AMAZING !!!

I really love this Sport but i´m soo new and of course with no idea!! .- My first session in static is 4:01 and that makes me thing about seriusly training.
Does some one a good training to share with a new discipule?
Many thanks to all
JP
 
4 minute session sounds like a great start. Try this [ame=http://forums.deeperblue.net/showthread.php?t=52854]little helper[/ame] and you'lll improve for sure :D

Here is a small pack of session files that i use on a regular base (or which i should use on a regular base):
 

Attachments

  • sessions.zip
    1.7 KB · Views: 230
Thanks Richochet

Cant open it doesnt seem to have an exe file. Any suggestions

Your help is really appriciated

Kind regards

Mark
 
Ricochet said:
4 minute session sounds like a great start. Try this little helper and you'lll improve for sure :D

Here is a small pack of session files that i use on a regular base (or which i should use on a regular base):
Thanks for it now i´m in 5.17!!! an going up :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: naiad
HI Budy!!

Great news 5.17 and continuing!!!
Do you have other type of training??
Many Many Many thanks
JP
 
Hi frogs. ;-)

Regards from Czech republic.
So freediving has captured another soul - yes, me. :)
I have decided to start with breath holding training because of my plan to go surfing to Hawaii next summer - to avoid drowning after some wipe out (which I expect (the wipe out - not drowning)). :)
But it has cought me and now I attend regulary diving lessons - once a week only, but it's fine.
I'm in my 7th week now. I have started with 2:10 apnea and on my 6th week I have reached 4:15
All apneas done dry - mainly while sitting in the bus - I travel a lot for job so when I have nothing to read I try to relax and hold the breath. Hope no passengers stare at me in astonisment. :-D
During my wet trainings I concentrate on dynamic with fins - can't make more than 50m.
When I started with my training I didn't know about any tables, so I trained just intuitively. Just hold breath as long as I can, then rest for few minutes and again and again. About five or six times. But what surpriced me the most - the fact that I'm not aware of the time spent during apnea - my mind is so calm that when I have reached that 4:15 I didn't believed my eyes and watches. It didn't seem to me that long.
Today I have tried one of those tables - O2, but found it unpleasant for me - checking the time distracts me and I can't hold breath long enough to reach even 3 minutes. So I'll continue with those intuitive trainings I have done so far.

Will report about any other progress - if there is some - seems to me that 5 minutes are far as hell. :-D

Have a good time.

Pete

(Dare & Enjoy)
 
DeeperBlue.com - The Worlds Largest Community Dedicated To Freediving, Scuba Diving and Spearfishing

ABOUT US

ISSN 1469-865X | Copyright © 1996 - 2024 deeperblue.net limited.

DeeperBlue.com is the World's Largest Community dedicated to Freediving, Scuba Diving, Ocean Advocacy and Diving Travel.

We've been dedicated to bringing you the freshest news, features and discussions from around the underwater world since 1996.

ADVERT