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The pain of hypoxia...

Thread Status: Hello , There was no answer in this thread for more than 60 days.
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BatRay

BatRay

Well-Known Member
Nov 1, 2002
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Only what I heard, not from personal experience, thank goodness...:D
 
E

efattah

Well-Known Member
Mar 2, 2001
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2nd hand

One of Laminar's relatives 'drowned' and survived, and his first hand testimonial (if I remember) was that it wasn't painful...

Eric Fattah
BC, Canada
 
BatRay

BatRay

Well-Known Member
Nov 1, 2002
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The airways do admit some water, but they close down shortly afterward. Drowning victims usually do not have a lot of water in their lungs for that reason. People can actually asphyxiate/drown on a very small amount of fluid.
 
Ben Gowland

Ben Gowland

Aplysia gowlandicus
Apr 4, 2002
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It takes around 2.5ml or more of water per kg of bodyweight to drown properly.

Read that in a diving medicine book, I did.

I cough like a demon if I get more than a microlitre of fluid down my trachea.
 
BatRay

BatRay

Well-Known Member
Nov 1, 2002
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2.5ml

darn metric measurements :head

That would be about half a teaspoon. That's not very much.
 
wilfdarr

wilfdarr

New Member
Aug 10, 2002
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My two cents

#1: My mom has a friend who "drowned". she says that it did not hurt untill she became concious again. Then it felt like her lung was literly being torn from her chest cavity. she says that at some points she wished she was left in the drink.

#2: I have had LMC's twice now:naughty , both during dynimacs, ALWAYS WITH A BUDY:head!!! This is mostly because I have fewer contractions (10-20, compared to 40-55 in my static). I have learned to count on other signals, like a light burning in my legs and arms to tell me when my swim is done. So, for you folks who have early or no contractions, maby try waiting for other signals, even passing out. Find out what happens in the 10 seconds before you LMC, so you can breath then, as it will take 3-5 sec for your brain to get the air you breath. I also suggest doing this dry, so you can have 100% confidence that you will regain conciousness. I have found this reasurence that I will not die to be the biggest factor in my progression (march this year: 2 min stat, 30 m dyn => December this year: 4:30 stat, 70 m dyn).
 
A

Alun

Well-Known Member
Oct 5, 2001
763
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per kg, don't forget!

2.5ml/kg x 75kg = 187.5ml = half a coke can

Long live metric I say! Boo, down with imperial!! :)

(I often try to convince with my 65 year old dad about how the imperial system probably held back man's progress by decades! Pounds, shillings and pence was an equally feather-brained idea. :duh)


alun
 
BatRay

BatRay

Well-Known Member
Nov 1, 2002
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It's the substandard American educational system!:duh

I also blame movies, TV, politics, Bill Clinton....:duh :duh :duh
The U.S. was supposed to convert to metric decades ago. Hasn't exactly happened yet.
 
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