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What's the deepest dive you've done???

MozSpearer

Active Member
Nov 19, 2013
184
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43
Mozambique
Hi there!

I have been wondering for some time what diving talents lurk on DB. I am sure others too.

So I'd like to hear from as many spearos and freedivers what is the deepest they've dived. Under what conditions? It can also be a dive you did under difficult conditions...

Let me start with mine:

I was freediving at the reef at Inhaca. There is this one deep spot(where the reef meets the sand) where its about 22m deep(I've read reports of scuba divers who dive there because I don't have a dive computer). The tide was busy turning so the current was zero. I did a 2 minute breathe up and dove into the abyss... I get to the bottom with a awesome feeling. I look at my stopwatch, 30 seconds to get down there. I look around a bit taking in the beauty of the seastars(there were so many there but funnily enough nowhere shallower on the reef). Then start heading up. Total dive time 1:10min.

This was done with a shortie wetsuit, no weights and scuba fins. My PB dive.

Hope many of you reply. I'd love to hear your stories.

Regards. ;)
 
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MozSpearer

Active Member
Nov 19, 2013
184
30
43
Mozambique
Come on guys! the depth doesn't have to be exact just a educated guess! Or just any awesome dive you've experienced(swimming with a turtle or dolphin or a SHARK). Cheers;)
 
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MozSpearer

Active Member
Nov 19, 2013
184
30
43
Mozambique
Hi manalive. Thanx for your reply. thats a good depth! <its funny how the shallower dives are sometimes the best! Thank you.
 

charlie.

Active Member
Aug 12, 2013
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oxfordshire/yorkshire
i hit 25m this year down in newquay. 5mm wetsuit, weighted with 5kg and with freedive fins. i have no idea how long my breathe up was i went as soon as it felt right. i really dont remember the first 5 or so meters then the dark and cold hit after (about) half way, then hitting the plate and then the immense feeling breaking the surface of well im not sure on a long one, everything in the last 2 years coming together.....pure confidence........very sereal.
 
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MozSpearer

Active Member
Nov 19, 2013
184
30
43
Mozambique
That's a good dive man. I also dive when I feel ready, I just time it for interest's sake not to control the length. I'm hoping to do a PB next time I get to a spot deep enough as my practice dives last up to 2minutes now. Thanks for your contribution
 

Kars

Well-Known Member
Oct 24, 2003
3,443
566
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The Netherlands
www.freeapnea.nl
Interesting question, can be answered in more then 1 way.
In absolute meters, 65m.
In terms of spiritual experience, the 6:50 static in Belgium. That dive went far beyond my imagination.
As my preparation, I did my slow straw outside, enjoying a quiet place next to the pool, smelling and absorbing the fresh air down into my toes. About 30min before official top I put on my suit, and slowly went into the water. As my final preparation I laid on my back and breathed shallow and little true my nose, concentrating on the vibrations the slow airflow created. 5 minutes before OT, my coach Rik, gently let me float into the competition zone. My legs, arms and body felt like glowing beams of light. I exhaled, inhaled, packed and rolled over. Butterflies stirred my belly, a mix of nerves and high expectations, who ran out of the door when this terrible itch in my throat appeared. At first I tried to ignore it, then swallow it away, but none of it helped. Then I remembered a tip from a diver at my last competition in Berlin, to take in a sip of water and use that to flush away this increasing annoyance. It worked counter-productive and now the itch induced involuntary swallowing at just under 2' of the breath-hold. It was to be a long one, but not in a good way. What could I do, give up? no, let's see how far we can go none-the-less. I could not help the swallowing reflex so I retreated to focussing on a place just behind my sinuses, and wait it out.
It was like no time had passed when Rik gave me a tap on the shoulder at 5'. The contractions that usually start at 2'30"were strangely absent, my mind was awake and clear, and it was all way too easy. The 6' flew by with equal ease, and it felt like I could do this for much longer. At 6'45" Rik told me to come up, as I instructed him before the dive, so I could secure another National Record, and I carefully came up at 6'50", did the surface protocol, looked around saw the safetydiver with his hands out and thanked him for his voluntary work shaking his hand... before the Jury's card.
 
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MozSpearer

Active Member
Nov 19, 2013
184
30
43
Mozambique
Nicely done!! I couldn't dream of going that long or deep!! So you got a national record?' For which country? Well done mate! Thanks for the reply.

More people who want to tell their amazing story??
 

Kars

Well-Known Member
Oct 24, 2003
3,443
566
203
42
The Netherlands
www.freeapnea.nl
The only Dutch national record I still have is the 65m CWT, which was also a special dive done in a Swedish Fjord. I'll post that story later, let's see what others come up with.

What makes a dive special for you?
 
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MozSpearer

Active Member
Nov 19, 2013
184
30
43
Mozambique
That is some record!!

For me a special dive is one that you feel relaxed to your fingertips from the moment you start breathing up for the dive. And as you descend you get an increasing feeling of relaxation and calm. Sometimes when you are at the bottom or if you've just increased your PB you get this awesome feeling. Or even just when you don't dive very deep but stay down forever and surface feeling like king of the world!! Or just watch an interesting sea creature.

I can remember 3 dives like this... Two of them was this year(one of which i've mentioned earlier in this thread), the other was 2010 a very relaxed and euphoric dive.

Looking forward to your other story...

Anybody else?
 

HydroApprentice

Active Member
Mar 17, 2014
171
50
43
Traveling
OK this was not deep as in terms of depth. I was diving in Egypt, and probably not much deeper than 15 m or so. But it was one if those magical dives when you glide along a beautiful coral reef, without effort and with total peace of mind. You enter this meditative state and you enjoy the beauty of the surroundings while you slowly sink and glide along the reef. And then, at some point, the following thought occurs to you, slow and viscous as honey: "Dude, don't you need to breath at some point?" :D
 

sharkey

Well-Known Member
Nov 22, 2013
316
177
58
I have known too many young keen spearo's that are no longer with us because they were too concerned about depth & times instead of their fishing skills. This is the spearo's section, not the apnea forum if I'm correct? (I stay out of there) Trust me, all the depth that you will need to get fish will come as you practice your fishing skills, not the other way around. Sorry to cast a shadow over this subject for all you good keen spearo's, but fishing skills are more important than how deep you can dive. Depth will come naturally & will also vary from day to day depending on your health & attitude. In my own circle its considered bad form or etiquette to openly discuss depth or times, particularly to inexperienced or impressionable divers. Spearo's chase fish, not depth or the stopwatch, IMO some of the greatest fish ever landed have been taken in very shallow water.

Safe Fishing!

Cheers Sharkey
 

PJB

Active Member
Jun 2, 2014
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I have known too many young keen spearo's that are no longer with us because they were too concerned about depth & times instead of their fishing skills. This is the spearo's section, not the apnea forum if I'm correct? (I stay out of there) Trust me, all the depth that you will need to get fish will come as you practice your fishing skills, not the other way around. Sorry to cast a shadow over this subject for all you good keen spearo's, but fishing skills are more important than how deep you can dive. Depth will come naturally & will also vary from day to day depending on your health & attitude. In my own circle its considered bad form or etiquette to openly discuss depth or times, particularly to inexperienced or impressionable divers. Spearo's chase fish, not depth or the stopwatch, IMO some of the greatest fish ever landed have been taken in very shallow water.

Safe Fishing!

Cheers Sharkey
Morning Sharkey. Have to say I agree - in principle - with your advice insofar as its important not to chase depth and time. Focusing on process rather than end results is good advice for life in general, and even more so in apnea. But at the same time its rather unfortunate that you believe there is somehow a difference between 'spearing' and 'apnea'. Spearing IS apnea - but merely a task-based offshoot. So the same principles that apply to a deep (or long) dive (specific training, preparation, efficiency, technique & safety) all make for a good dive, which makes for a good hunt. From what I've seen this seemingly widely held approach by the spearing community that their discipline is somehow disconnected from the physiological and mental rules that apply to depth disciplines detracts from, rather than adds, to the skills base many new spearos could develop. Example: on course in the Red Sea once I met a 28-year old Greek guy who told me he'd been spearing since he was 8, and had learnt more in 1 week with Umberto Pelizzari than in all the years he'd been hunting; too his max depth from 28m to 46m in 4 days, and boosted his static by 30% - all just because he finally got the opportunity to understand the nuances in technique and (his personal) physiology better. Surely that's a good thing - for both spearing and depth apnea?
 

sharkey

Well-Known Member
Nov 22, 2013
316
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58
Focusing on process rather than end results is good advice for life in general, and even more so in apnea.

Example: on course in the Red Sea once I met a 28-year old Greek guy who told me he'd been spearing since he was 8, and had learnt more in 1 week with Umberto Pelizzari than in all the years he'd been hunting; too his max depth from 28m to 46m in 4 days, and boosted his static by 30% - all just because he finally got the opportunity to understand the nuances in technique and (his personal) physiology better. Surely that's a good thing - for both spearing and depth apnea?
G'day PJB
You almost had me with the first bit, but then? It's all just about time & numbers in the end isn't it.

I guess I was lucky to start my spearfishing in the 70's down here. Apnea had been a "fad" in the 60's here, but the consequential loss of life saw it become shunned as a pursuit. Throughout the 70's, 80's & early 90's no one had any interest in "apnea" & if anyone did our elders quickly discouraged it. With the advent of "extreme" sports apnea gained some interest in the mid to late 90's & as a consequence we started loosing some very fine young men while spearfishing. I believe apnea, like other "extreme" sports by definition encourages folks to "go beyond what is considered reasonable" & it, in my own experience contributes to needless tragedy. I'm all in favour of better education , understanding of physiology & increased safety, but when the question is presented by a keen young spearo "what is your deepest dive?" I get a cold shiver. I would always discourage any spearfishing org from becoming involved with, participating in, or encouraging apnea events.

I stay out of the apnea forum here, I respect & defend your right to pursue this discipline, but respect that the breath hold itself is only a small part of becoming a successful spearo & spearfishing is usually practiced with less supervision or in controlled situations than apnea events are. I firmly believe that had "apnea" not been publicised & encouraged down here by some, we would still enjoy the company of some very fine folk. Sorry, but this is my thoughts on "apnea & spearfishing". Education for sure, bring it on ,but diving for just a number? No thank you!

All The Best
Sharkey
 

PJB

Active Member
Jun 2, 2014
56
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G'day PJB
You almost had me with the first bit, but then? It's all just about time & numbers in the end isn't it.

I guess I was lucky to start my spearfishing in the 70's down here. Apnea had been a "fad" in the 60's here, but the consequential loss of life saw it become shunned as a pursuit. Throughout the 70's, 80's & early 90's no one had any interest in "apnea" & if anyone did our elders quickly discouraged it. With the advent of "extreme" sports apnea gained some interest in the mid to late 90's & as a consequence we started loosing some very fine young men while spearfishing. I believe apnea, like other "extreme" sports by definition encourages folks to "go beyond what is considered reasonable" & it, in my own experience contributes to needless tragedy. I'm all in favour of better education , understanding of physiology & increased safety, but when the question is presented by a keen young spearo "what is your deepest dive?" I get a cold shiver. I would always discourage any spearfishing org from becoming involved with, participating in, or encouraging apnea events.

I stay out of the apnea forum here, I respect & defend your right to pursue this discipline, but respect that the breath hold itself is only a small part of becoming a successful spearo & spearfishing is usually practiced with less supervision or in controlled situations than apnea events are. I firmly believe that had "apnea" not been publicised & encouraged down here by some, we would still enjoy the company of some very fine folk. Sorry, but this is my thoughts on "apnea & spearfishing". Education for sure, bring it on ,but diving for just a number? No thank you!

All The Best
Sharkey
Hey Sharkey,

Ironically I suspect we're coming to the same broad point but just from different angles. No, my point is not about 'numbers' but the same 'process-approach' you promoted in your first post. I'm based in South Africa where ocean conditions are..well..relatively challenging. We lose our fair share of spearos - mostly unnecessarily - and lack of technique and education plays a significant part. Spearing has developed a 'hard man' ethos that peers down its nose at 'apnea' and there's little one can do but shrug when you see even the most experienced spearos failing to apply the most basic elements of preparation, technique or safety. And when you engage with them you find, more often than not, that its because they'll only take diving advice of any from other spearos or spearo publications, so the loop continues. My Sharm example wasn't about the numbers - but it could only be illustrated with numbers; it was really about how, once fundamental principles were applied to an experienced spearo, the numbers followed automatically. Which is identical to what you were saying. /and contrary to what most spearos think, most deeper apneists aren't actually chasing 'numbers' but rather the physical and mental sensations that are experienced at depth. My belief is that a better, safer diver with a holistic approach to the sport should make for a better hunter - but not necessarily the other way around. That said, I;ll well aware of the apprenticeship and incredible skill it takes to become an effective hunter. There's more room for crossover and so this is what I'm trying to promote on this post. Keep well and happy hunting!
 
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PJB

Active Member
Jun 2, 2014
56
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[QUOTE="PJB, post: 931501,

Sorry Sharkey, one last thought: I note you're also a 'greybeard spearo' so 1) much respect and 2) your references about the 60's and 70's are telling insofar as they validate a lot of what your concerns are. Those were the 'adolescent' days of the sport and you're right, the toll was high. Medical understanding of physiology and training as improved exponentially since then, and ultimately forms part of my point: the cultural barrier between hunting and depth needs to be looked at so that we can all take the sport forward - in all its forms. Cheers!